Andrew Sedmihradsky and son Max planning a Big Ride to defeat Duchenne muscular dystrophy

News Mar 20, 2015 by Debra Downey Ancaster News

When life lobs a challenge into your path, there are  two options.

You can roll over and play dead, or you can roll up your sleeves and get busy.

This summer Andrew Sedmihradsky and his four-year-old son Max are getting busy — really busy.

The pair will climb aboard a cargo bike on Sunday, June 21 to embark on a 600-kilometre journey from Ottawa to Hamilton on the Trans Canada Trail. They’ll travel roughly 50 kilometres a day, visit some playgrounds along the way, perhaps enjoy a picnic and kick back in the evening for some well-deserved rest and relaxation.

“Max loves riding and is thrilled to have the best seat in the house (on the cargo bike),” said dad. “I’ve told him it will be a long trip with lots of stops for ice cream, so he’s super excited about the terrific adventure that awaits.”

A bright and funny youngster, Max has zipped along on the back of his dad’s bike ever since he was a baby. In fact, dad and mom, Kerri, joke that their bubbly, beloved boy was probably born to ride. Shortly after his birth on Sept. 24, 2010, in Geelong, Australia, the newborn and his folks took a stroll and  unexpectedly met up with four-time world champion cyclist Fabian Cancellara.

“He (Fabian) was the very first person Max met after leaving the hospital in which he was born,” said Sedmihradsky. “It was pretty cool.”

Max also loves riding his trike to school and spent the better part of last summer travelling up and down the driveway at his grandparents’ Ancaster home. The rambunctious toddler rarely stops talking and one of his favorite topics is all the things he’s going to do when he’s older — learning to skateboard, ski, ride with friends, play hockey and soccer.

The medical odds, however, are against Max being able to do any of those things.

Max has Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a fatal and progressive genetic disorder that gradually weakens the body’s muscles.  Most children who suffer from DMD are in a wheelchair by the time they are 12 years old and have a life expectancy of just over 20 years.

“It’s a terrible disease which doesn’t allow Max’s muscles to develop like other kids,” said Sedmihradsky.  “So unless we find a cure, he will never get a chance to do the things he dreams about doing.”

Max’s Big Ride this summer aims to altar the course of Max’s life and all those who love him. Funds raised will go to Jesse’s Journey, which provides funding for research into Duchenne. The organization was founded by another father, John Davidson, who set out 20 years ago on a mission to push his 15-year-old son, Jesse, across Ontario in his wheelchair.

Sedmihradsky has met with the London, Ont., native, discussed Max’s Big Ride and finds inspiration in Davidson’s observation that when life gets rough, “You can roll over and play dead, or you can roll up your sleeves and get busy.”

“Each day I try to ‘get busy’ in some way towards our goal of defeating Duchenne,” said Sedmihradsky, who works in student services at the University of Toronto Mississauga.

Since  he decided to undertake Max’s Big Ride in October of last year, Sedmihradsky has mapped out a route, acquired the loan of a cargo bike from Kendra Davidson-Bowen and Andrew Bowen, owners of Urkai in Burlington, is fine-turning all the minor details the ride will entail and training rigorously to ensure he’s in tip-top shape to take on the trek.

Very little, however, will stand in the way of dad’s determination to raise funds to find a cure for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

“This (the ride) is nothing compared to what Max is going to go through,” said Sedmihradsky. “No matter what, I will fight this. Fight Duchenne...fight for Max.”

To learn more about Max’s Big Ride or to make a donation, visit www.maxsbigride.com.

 

 

 

 

Andrew Sedmihradsky and son Max planning a Big Ride to defeat Duchenne muscular dystrophy

News Mar 20, 2015 by Debra Downey Ancaster News

When life lobs a challenge into your path, there are  two options.

You can roll over and play dead, or you can roll up your sleeves and get busy.

This summer Andrew Sedmihradsky and his four-year-old son Max are getting busy — really busy.

The pair will climb aboard a cargo bike on Sunday, June 21 to embark on a 600-kilometre journey from Ottawa to Hamilton on the Trans Canada Trail. They’ll travel roughly 50 kilometres a day, visit some playgrounds along the way, perhaps enjoy a picnic and kick back in the evening for some well-deserved rest and relaxation.

Related Content

“Max loves riding and is thrilled to have the best seat in the house (on the cargo bike),” said dad. “I’ve told him it will be a long trip with lots of stops for ice cream, so he’s super excited about the terrific adventure that awaits.”

A bright and funny youngster, Max has zipped along on the back of his dad’s bike ever since he was a baby. In fact, dad and mom, Kerri, joke that their bubbly, beloved boy was probably born to ride. Shortly after his birth on Sept. 24, 2010, in Geelong, Australia, the newborn and his folks took a stroll and  unexpectedly met up with four-time world champion cyclist Fabian Cancellara.

“He (Fabian) was the very first person Max met after leaving the hospital in which he was born,” said Sedmihradsky. “It was pretty cool.”

Max also loves riding his trike to school and spent the better part of last summer travelling up and down the driveway at his grandparents’ Ancaster home. The rambunctious toddler rarely stops talking and one of his favorite topics is all the things he’s going to do when he’s older — learning to skateboard, ski, ride with friends, play hockey and soccer.

The medical odds, however, are against Max being able to do any of those things.

Max has Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a fatal and progressive genetic disorder that gradually weakens the body’s muscles.  Most children who suffer from DMD are in a wheelchair by the time they are 12 years old and have a life expectancy of just over 20 years.

“It’s a terrible disease which doesn’t allow Max’s muscles to develop like other kids,” said Sedmihradsky.  “So unless we find a cure, he will never get a chance to do the things he dreams about doing.”

Max’s Big Ride this summer aims to altar the course of Max’s life and all those who love him. Funds raised will go to Jesse’s Journey, which provides funding for research into Duchenne. The organization was founded by another father, John Davidson, who set out 20 years ago on a mission to push his 15-year-old son, Jesse, across Ontario in his wheelchair.

Sedmihradsky has met with the London, Ont., native, discussed Max’s Big Ride and finds inspiration in Davidson’s observation that when life gets rough, “You can roll over and play dead, or you can roll up your sleeves and get busy.”

“Each day I try to ‘get busy’ in some way towards our goal of defeating Duchenne,” said Sedmihradsky, who works in student services at the University of Toronto Mississauga.

Since  he decided to undertake Max’s Big Ride in October of last year, Sedmihradsky has mapped out a route, acquired the loan of a cargo bike from Kendra Davidson-Bowen and Andrew Bowen, owners of Urkai in Burlington, is fine-turning all the minor details the ride will entail and training rigorously to ensure he’s in tip-top shape to take on the trek.

Very little, however, will stand in the way of dad’s determination to raise funds to find a cure for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

“This (the ride) is nothing compared to what Max is going to go through,” said Sedmihradsky. “No matter what, I will fight this. Fight Duchenne...fight for Max.”

To learn more about Max’s Big Ride or to make a donation, visit www.maxsbigride.com.

 

 

 

 

Andrew Sedmihradsky and son Max planning a Big Ride to defeat Duchenne muscular dystrophy

News Mar 20, 2015 by Debra Downey Ancaster News

When life lobs a challenge into your path, there are  two options.

You can roll over and play dead, or you can roll up your sleeves and get busy.

This summer Andrew Sedmihradsky and his four-year-old son Max are getting busy — really busy.

The pair will climb aboard a cargo bike on Sunday, June 21 to embark on a 600-kilometre journey from Ottawa to Hamilton on the Trans Canada Trail. They’ll travel roughly 50 kilometres a day, visit some playgrounds along the way, perhaps enjoy a picnic and kick back in the evening for some well-deserved rest and relaxation.

Related Content

“Max loves riding and is thrilled to have the best seat in the house (on the cargo bike),” said dad. “I’ve told him it will be a long trip with lots of stops for ice cream, so he’s super excited about the terrific adventure that awaits.”

A bright and funny youngster, Max has zipped along on the back of his dad’s bike ever since he was a baby. In fact, dad and mom, Kerri, joke that their bubbly, beloved boy was probably born to ride. Shortly after his birth on Sept. 24, 2010, in Geelong, Australia, the newborn and his folks took a stroll and  unexpectedly met up with four-time world champion cyclist Fabian Cancellara.

“He (Fabian) was the very first person Max met after leaving the hospital in which he was born,” said Sedmihradsky. “It was pretty cool.”

Max also loves riding his trike to school and spent the better part of last summer travelling up and down the driveway at his grandparents’ Ancaster home. The rambunctious toddler rarely stops talking and one of his favorite topics is all the things he’s going to do when he’s older — learning to skateboard, ski, ride with friends, play hockey and soccer.

The medical odds, however, are against Max being able to do any of those things.

Max has Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a fatal and progressive genetic disorder that gradually weakens the body’s muscles.  Most children who suffer from DMD are in a wheelchair by the time they are 12 years old and have a life expectancy of just over 20 years.

“It’s a terrible disease which doesn’t allow Max’s muscles to develop like other kids,” said Sedmihradsky.  “So unless we find a cure, he will never get a chance to do the things he dreams about doing.”

Max’s Big Ride this summer aims to altar the course of Max’s life and all those who love him. Funds raised will go to Jesse’s Journey, which provides funding for research into Duchenne. The organization was founded by another father, John Davidson, who set out 20 years ago on a mission to push his 15-year-old son, Jesse, across Ontario in his wheelchair.

Sedmihradsky has met with the London, Ont., native, discussed Max’s Big Ride and finds inspiration in Davidson’s observation that when life gets rough, “You can roll over and play dead, or you can roll up your sleeves and get busy.”

“Each day I try to ‘get busy’ in some way towards our goal of defeating Duchenne,” said Sedmihradsky, who works in student services at the University of Toronto Mississauga.

Since  he decided to undertake Max’s Big Ride in October of last year, Sedmihradsky has mapped out a route, acquired the loan of a cargo bike from Kendra Davidson-Bowen and Andrew Bowen, owners of Urkai in Burlington, is fine-turning all the minor details the ride will entail and training rigorously to ensure he’s in tip-top shape to take on the trek.

Very little, however, will stand in the way of dad’s determination to raise funds to find a cure for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

“This (the ride) is nothing compared to what Max is going to go through,” said Sedmihradsky. “No matter what, I will fight this. Fight Duchenne...fight for Max.”

To learn more about Max’s Big Ride or to make a donation, visit www.maxsbigride.com.