Hamilton creating “blue ribbon panel” to examine skills shortage in city

News Mar 16, 2015 Hamilton Mountain News

 By Kevin Werner, News Staff

 Hamilton Mayor Fred Eisenberger says the city’s economic development department is creating a “blue ribbon panel” that will examine the skills training shortage that is making it difficult for industries to hire people.

“There is a real interest in addressing the skills shortage that all advanced manufacturers is facing,” said Eisenberger.

He revealed during a March 12 government relations sub-committee meeting that economic development staff are crafting the terms of references and goals of the committee. City staff will also reach out to Mohawk College and McMaster Universityto contribute to the panel.

“How will (education institutions) fill that bill keeping manufacturing a strong foundation of this city?” said Eisenberger. “We need to deliver where the shortages are and where we need to go.”

The mayor expects the city to provide some resources to move the panel forward, including staff, and possibly money. He said staff could present the guidelines of the panel to politicians to approve within the next month.

Mohawk College spokesperson Sean Coffey said the college already works closely with the city’s economic development staff “on a number of fronts.” He said the college would be willing to join the task force if asked.

“We are happy to work with the city on any issue that is important to the community,” he said.

A McMaster University spokesperson said he was investigating the issue.

A Deloitte study called The Current and Future State of Hamilton’s Advanced Manufacturing Sector, presented to councillors January 2014, stated that the city was “well positioned” in areas of steel, food and beverages, machinery, auto parts, clean technology and life sciences. It stated thatHamiltonshould “identify gaps in local demand and supply of advanced manufacturing talent” and support and expand education and technological training.

Eisenberger did talk about Hamilton’s skill shortage during the last mayoral election. As the city transitions from a heavy manufacturing base to one that is more diverse, concentrating on high technology, it is city hall’s responsibility to help businesses recruit the proper employees with the necessary skills, he said.

“We need employment in our city,” said Eisenberger. “If we are not training up the right people for the right jobs that are being provided by our leading employers in our community there is a gap there that needs to be realized and filled.”

 

Hamilton creating “blue ribbon panel” to examine skills shortage in city

News Mar 16, 2015 Hamilton Mountain News

 By Kevin Werner, News Staff

 Hamilton Mayor Fred Eisenberger says the city’s economic development department is creating a “blue ribbon panel” that will examine the skills training shortage that is making it difficult for industries to hire people.

“There is a real interest in addressing the skills shortage that all advanced manufacturers is facing,” said Eisenberger.

He revealed during a March 12 government relations sub-committee meeting that economic development staff are crafting the terms of references and goals of the committee. City staff will also reach out to Mohawk College and McMaster Universityto contribute to the panel.

“How will (education institutions) fill that bill keeping manufacturing a strong foundation of this city?” said Eisenberger. “We need to deliver where the shortages are and where we need to go.”

The mayor expects the city to provide some resources to move the panel forward, including staff, and possibly money. He said staff could present the guidelines of the panel to politicians to approve within the next month.

Mohawk College spokesperson Sean Coffey said the college already works closely with the city’s economic development staff “on a number of fronts.” He said the college would be willing to join the task force if asked.

“We are happy to work with the city on any issue that is important to the community,” he said.

A McMaster University spokesperson said he was investigating the issue.

A Deloitte study called The Current and Future State of Hamilton’s Advanced Manufacturing Sector, presented to councillors January 2014, stated that the city was “well positioned” in areas of steel, food and beverages, machinery, auto parts, clean technology and life sciences. It stated thatHamiltonshould “identify gaps in local demand and supply of advanced manufacturing talent” and support and expand education and technological training.

Eisenberger did talk about Hamilton’s skill shortage during the last mayoral election. As the city transitions from a heavy manufacturing base to one that is more diverse, concentrating on high technology, it is city hall’s responsibility to help businesses recruit the proper employees with the necessary skills, he said.

“We need employment in our city,” said Eisenberger. “If we are not training up the right people for the right jobs that are being provided by our leading employers in our community there is a gap there that needs to be realized and filled.”

 

Hamilton creating “blue ribbon panel” to examine skills shortage in city

News Mar 16, 2015 Hamilton Mountain News

 By Kevin Werner, News Staff

 Hamilton Mayor Fred Eisenberger says the city’s economic development department is creating a “blue ribbon panel” that will examine the skills training shortage that is making it difficult for industries to hire people.

“There is a real interest in addressing the skills shortage that all advanced manufacturers is facing,” said Eisenberger.

He revealed during a March 12 government relations sub-committee meeting that economic development staff are crafting the terms of references and goals of the committee. City staff will also reach out to Mohawk College and McMaster Universityto contribute to the panel.

“How will (education institutions) fill that bill keeping manufacturing a strong foundation of this city?” said Eisenberger. “We need to deliver where the shortages are and where we need to go.”

The mayor expects the city to provide some resources to move the panel forward, including staff, and possibly money. He said staff could present the guidelines of the panel to politicians to approve within the next month.

Mohawk College spokesperson Sean Coffey said the college already works closely with the city’s economic development staff “on a number of fronts.” He said the college would be willing to join the task force if asked.

“We are happy to work with the city on any issue that is important to the community,” he said.

A McMaster University spokesperson said he was investigating the issue.

A Deloitte study called The Current and Future State of Hamilton’s Advanced Manufacturing Sector, presented to councillors January 2014, stated that the city was “well positioned” in areas of steel, food and beverages, machinery, auto parts, clean technology and life sciences. It stated thatHamiltonshould “identify gaps in local demand and supply of advanced manufacturing talent” and support and expand education and technological training.

Eisenberger did talk about Hamilton’s skill shortage during the last mayoral election. As the city transitions from a heavy manufacturing base to one that is more diverse, concentrating on high technology, it is city hall’s responsibility to help businesses recruit the proper employees with the necessary skills, he said.

“We need employment in our city,” said Eisenberger. “If we are not training up the right people for the right jobs that are being provided by our leading employers in our community there is a gap there that needs to be realized and filled.”