Hamilton officials, politicians defend Macassa Lodge inspection findings

News Mar 11, 2015 Hamilton Mountain News

 By Kevin Werner, News Staff

 Hamilton staff and politicians are rallying around in support of its aging Macassa Lodge facility and employees after a provincial inspection found 23 problems, including three orders, to improve the facility’s operation.

“We welcome (the inspection),” said Vicki Woodcox, administrator for Macassa and Wentworth lodges. “We look upon this as an opportunity. We did well considering there have been no inspections for four years.”

She said since the provincial government establishes new regulations in 2010, Macassa Lodge, located at 710 Upper Sherman Ave. has not had an inspection since that time.

The inspection was conducted last fall following stricter provincial guidelines that were introduced in 2007 and completed in 2010.

Macassa Lodge is operated under the province’s Long-term Care Act.

Woodcox told politicians at the March 11 council meeting, the three orders involved improving the facility’s lighting, securing the exit accesses, and upgrading Macassa’s “call bell” service.

The remaining 20 issues involved “observations” by inspectors of clients at the lodge, said Woodcox. One woman was seen sleeping in a chair was trying to eat, said Woodcox. But the inspection also forced the facility to replace almost all of its eight tubs, for instance, she said.

Mountain councillor Tom Jackson, who has been an unabashed supporter of the lodge, placed his complete faith in Woodcox and the facility’s staff.

“There are logical explanations (for all the issues),” said Jackson. “There were issues that staff had done, or were going to do. No home is perfect, no system is perfect. I maintain the lodges are second to none in all of the province.”

Woodcox said “90 per cent” of the problems have been corrected.

Jackson did make one suggestion. He wanted any inspection report, order or issue to be part of an update presented to councillors in the future.”

Woodcox said a survey conducted by the facility after the inspections were conducted last fall, found the overwhelming majority of the 270 residents remained satisfied and safe with the service and programs at the lodge.

Woodcox also provided an update to the family and residential councils about the inspections.

“We do see (the inspections) as an opportunity to improve,” said Woodcox. “Is there room for improvement? Yes. There will be more challenges.”

The news of the inspection, which will cost the city over $1.2 million comes at the same time  a study reveals  both timeworn buildings will need up to $1.5 million in annual upgrades over the next decade.

Macassa was constructed in the 1950s and has had renovations in the 1980s, the 1990s, and upgrades were made to one wing in 2001. Both lodges hold a total of about 430 people.

During a recent budget meeting, Woodcox urged councillors to approve $500,000 this year to create a reserve fund for the buildings. Politicians delayed voting on the request until the March 24 budget meeting.

 

 

Hamilton officials, politicians defend Macassa Lodge inspection findings

News Mar 11, 2015 Hamilton Mountain News

 By Kevin Werner, News Staff

 Hamilton staff and politicians are rallying around in support of its aging Macassa Lodge facility and employees after a provincial inspection found 23 problems, including three orders, to improve the facility’s operation.

“We welcome (the inspection),” said Vicki Woodcox, administrator for Macassa and Wentworth lodges. “We look upon this as an opportunity. We did well considering there have been no inspections for four years.”

She said since the provincial government establishes new regulations in 2010, Macassa Lodge, located at 710 Upper Sherman Ave. has not had an inspection since that time.

The inspection was conducted last fall following stricter provincial guidelines that were introduced in 2007 and completed in 2010.

Macassa Lodge is operated under the province’s Long-term Care Act.

Woodcox told politicians at the March 11 council meeting, the three orders involved improving the facility’s lighting, securing the exit accesses, and upgrading Macassa’s “call bell” service.

The remaining 20 issues involved “observations” by inspectors of clients at the lodge, said Woodcox. One woman was seen sleeping in a chair was trying to eat, said Woodcox. But the inspection also forced the facility to replace almost all of its eight tubs, for instance, she said.

Mountain councillor Tom Jackson, who has been an unabashed supporter of the lodge, placed his complete faith in Woodcox and the facility’s staff.

“There are logical explanations (for all the issues),” said Jackson. “There were issues that staff had done, or were going to do. No home is perfect, no system is perfect. I maintain the lodges are second to none in all of the province.”

Woodcox said “90 per cent” of the problems have been corrected.

Jackson did make one suggestion. He wanted any inspection report, order or issue to be part of an update presented to councillors in the future.”

Woodcox said a survey conducted by the facility after the inspections were conducted last fall, found the overwhelming majority of the 270 residents remained satisfied and safe with the service and programs at the lodge.

Woodcox also provided an update to the family and residential councils about the inspections.

“We do see (the inspections) as an opportunity to improve,” said Woodcox. “Is there room for improvement? Yes. There will be more challenges.”

The news of the inspection, which will cost the city over $1.2 million comes at the same time  a study reveals  both timeworn buildings will need up to $1.5 million in annual upgrades over the next decade.

Macassa was constructed in the 1950s and has had renovations in the 1980s, the 1990s, and upgrades were made to one wing in 2001. Both lodges hold a total of about 430 people.

During a recent budget meeting, Woodcox urged councillors to approve $500,000 this year to create a reserve fund for the buildings. Politicians delayed voting on the request until the March 24 budget meeting.

 

 

Hamilton officials, politicians defend Macassa Lodge inspection findings

News Mar 11, 2015 Hamilton Mountain News

 By Kevin Werner, News Staff

 Hamilton staff and politicians are rallying around in support of its aging Macassa Lodge facility and employees after a provincial inspection found 23 problems, including three orders, to improve the facility’s operation.

“We welcome (the inspection),” said Vicki Woodcox, administrator for Macassa and Wentworth lodges. “We look upon this as an opportunity. We did well considering there have been no inspections for four years.”

She said since the provincial government establishes new regulations in 2010, Macassa Lodge, located at 710 Upper Sherman Ave. has not had an inspection since that time.

The inspection was conducted last fall following stricter provincial guidelines that were introduced in 2007 and completed in 2010.

Macassa Lodge is operated under the province’s Long-term Care Act.

Woodcox told politicians at the March 11 council meeting, the three orders involved improving the facility’s lighting, securing the exit accesses, and upgrading Macassa’s “call bell” service.

The remaining 20 issues involved “observations” by inspectors of clients at the lodge, said Woodcox. One woman was seen sleeping in a chair was trying to eat, said Woodcox. But the inspection also forced the facility to replace almost all of its eight tubs, for instance, she said.

Mountain councillor Tom Jackson, who has been an unabashed supporter of the lodge, placed his complete faith in Woodcox and the facility’s staff.

“There are logical explanations (for all the issues),” said Jackson. “There were issues that staff had done, or were going to do. No home is perfect, no system is perfect. I maintain the lodges are second to none in all of the province.”

Woodcox said “90 per cent” of the problems have been corrected.

Jackson did make one suggestion. He wanted any inspection report, order or issue to be part of an update presented to councillors in the future.”

Woodcox said a survey conducted by the facility after the inspections were conducted last fall, found the overwhelming majority of the 270 residents remained satisfied and safe with the service and programs at the lodge.

Woodcox also provided an update to the family and residential councils about the inspections.

“We do see (the inspections) as an opportunity to improve,” said Woodcox. “Is there room for improvement? Yes. There will be more challenges.”

The news of the inspection, which will cost the city over $1.2 million comes at the same time  a study reveals  both timeworn buildings will need up to $1.5 million in annual upgrades over the next decade.

Macassa was constructed in the 1950s and has had renovations in the 1980s, the 1990s, and upgrades were made to one wing in 2001. Both lodges hold a total of about 430 people.

During a recent budget meeting, Woodcox urged councillors to approve $500,000 this year to create a reserve fund for the buildings. Politicians delayed voting on the request until the March 24 budget meeting.