Extra Hamilton Mountain ward possible after review

News Mar 10, 2015 Hamilton Mountain News

By Gord Bowes, News staff

It’s been put off by the previous two councils, but expect a decision on changing Hamilton ward boundaries to be made this term.

A staff report on the ward boundary review is expected to be presented to council later this month.

The report will outline options for councillors for keeping the status quo or adding extra wards for better constituent representation. Public consultation will occur before council makes its decision.

“It will be an interesting exercise to see what the pros and cons will be of the whole spectrum of options and scenarios,” says east Mountain councillor Tom Jackson.

Jackson, who has represented Ward 6 since 1988, argued for an extra ward at the time of amalgamation in 2000.

Prior to amalgamation, each Mountain ward was served by two aldermen. Once the individual municipalities of Hamilton-Wentworth joined together, the number of elected officials dropped to 16 from 59 and representation in Wards 6, 7 and 8 was reduced to a single councillor.

“I argued at the time for a fourth seat on the Mountain,” said Jackson. “I could see the growing population and felt it was more than justified.”

He said the three current wards could divide into four north-south wards or quadrants with Upper Wellington as a dividing line. The rejigging could possibly include changing the south boundary from the hydro corridor south of Rymal Road down to Twenty Road.

Jackson said while he remains supportive of a fourth Mountain ward, he noted the public rarely asks for an increase in politicians and the associated expenses.

At the time of the 2011 census, there were 40,293 residents in Ward 6, 60,281 in Ward 7 and 49,661 in Ward 8.

The average ward population was 34,663; Ward 14 had the lowest population at 16,897.

Ward 7 councillor Scott Duvall said he supports the review and will keep an open mind when the final report is tabled.

“It’s a growing area and we want to make sure there’s proper representation,” he said.

Ward 8 councillor Terry Whitehead did not reply to requests for comment.

In 2012, the last time the ward boundary review topic came up, council recognized the extra workload councillors faced and each Mountain rep was given extra staff to help them in their duties — a full-time person in Wards 7 and 8, a part-time person in Ward 6.

The province must be notified of any changes to ward boundaries by the end of 2017 in order to be effective for the 2018 municipal election.

Extra Hamilton Mountain ward possible after review

News Mar 10, 2015 Hamilton Mountain News

By Gord Bowes, News staff

It’s been put off by the previous two councils, but expect a decision on changing Hamilton ward boundaries to be made this term.

A staff report on the ward boundary review is expected to be presented to council later this month.

The report will outline options for councillors for keeping the status quo or adding extra wards for better constituent representation. Public consultation will occur before council makes its decision.

“It will be an interesting exercise to see what the pros and cons will be of the whole spectrum of options and scenarios,” says east Mountain councillor Tom Jackson.

Jackson, who has represented Ward 6 since 1988, argued for an extra ward at the time of amalgamation in 2000.

Prior to amalgamation, each Mountain ward was served by two aldermen. Once the individual municipalities of Hamilton-Wentworth joined together, the number of elected officials dropped to 16 from 59 and representation in Wards 6, 7 and 8 was reduced to a single councillor.

“I argued at the time for a fourth seat on the Mountain,” said Jackson. “I could see the growing population and felt it was more than justified.”

He said the three current wards could divide into four north-south wards or quadrants with Upper Wellington as a dividing line. The rejigging could possibly include changing the south boundary from the hydro corridor south of Rymal Road down to Twenty Road.

Jackson said while he remains supportive of a fourth Mountain ward, he noted the public rarely asks for an increase in politicians and the associated expenses.

At the time of the 2011 census, there were 40,293 residents in Ward 6, 60,281 in Ward 7 and 49,661 in Ward 8.

The average ward population was 34,663; Ward 14 had the lowest population at 16,897.

Ward 7 councillor Scott Duvall said he supports the review and will keep an open mind when the final report is tabled.

“It’s a growing area and we want to make sure there’s proper representation,” he said.

Ward 8 councillor Terry Whitehead did not reply to requests for comment.

In 2012, the last time the ward boundary review topic came up, council recognized the extra workload councillors faced and each Mountain rep was given extra staff to help them in their duties — a full-time person in Wards 7 and 8, a part-time person in Ward 6.

The province must be notified of any changes to ward boundaries by the end of 2017 in order to be effective for the 2018 municipal election.

Extra Hamilton Mountain ward possible after review

News Mar 10, 2015 Hamilton Mountain News

By Gord Bowes, News staff

It’s been put off by the previous two councils, but expect a decision on changing Hamilton ward boundaries to be made this term.

A staff report on the ward boundary review is expected to be presented to council later this month.

The report will outline options for councillors for keeping the status quo or adding extra wards for better constituent representation. Public consultation will occur before council makes its decision.

“It will be an interesting exercise to see what the pros and cons will be of the whole spectrum of options and scenarios,” says east Mountain councillor Tom Jackson.

Jackson, who has represented Ward 6 since 1988, argued for an extra ward at the time of amalgamation in 2000.

Prior to amalgamation, each Mountain ward was served by two aldermen. Once the individual municipalities of Hamilton-Wentworth joined together, the number of elected officials dropped to 16 from 59 and representation in Wards 6, 7 and 8 was reduced to a single councillor.

“I argued at the time for a fourth seat on the Mountain,” said Jackson. “I could see the growing population and felt it was more than justified.”

He said the three current wards could divide into four north-south wards or quadrants with Upper Wellington as a dividing line. The rejigging could possibly include changing the south boundary from the hydro corridor south of Rymal Road down to Twenty Road.

Jackson said while he remains supportive of a fourth Mountain ward, he noted the public rarely asks for an increase in politicians and the associated expenses.

At the time of the 2011 census, there were 40,293 residents in Ward 6, 60,281 in Ward 7 and 49,661 in Ward 8.

The average ward population was 34,663; Ward 14 had the lowest population at 16,897.

Ward 7 councillor Scott Duvall said he supports the review and will keep an open mind when the final report is tabled.

“It’s a growing area and we want to make sure there’s proper representation,” he said.

Ward 8 councillor Terry Whitehead did not reply to requests for comment.

In 2012, the last time the ward boundary review topic came up, council recognized the extra workload councillors faced and each Mountain rep was given extra staff to help them in their duties — a full-time person in Wards 7 and 8, a part-time person in Ward 6.

The province must be notified of any changes to ward boundaries by the end of 2017 in order to be effective for the 2018 municipal election.