Hamilton public board kept most Hill Park students, top boss says

News Feb 26, 2015 Hamilton Mountain News

By Richard Leitner, News Staff

Closing Hill Park Secondary School didn’t prompt a big exodus of students from Hamilton’s public school board, its interim education director says.

Pam Reinholdt said all but 19 of 373 Hill Park students in grades 9 to 11 switched to other board high schools this year, typically choosing the one closest to where they live.

Sixty-two of 205 students in Grade 12 also returned for “what the kids call a victory lap,” she told members of the board’s program committee.

Among those who would have attended Hill Park had it remained open, Sir Allan MacNab took in the most students at 162, followed by Henderson (formerly Barton) at 151, Sherwood at 86, Westmount at 22 and Ancaster at 4.

Delta, Westdale and Sir Winston Churchill each took in one student.

“These retention rates are actually very good. They’re not any different than they would be in any of our high schools and probably would be consistent with most boards,” Reinholdt said.

“Kids switch boards, switch schools, move, a number of things, so we were pleased.”

Board enrolment figures show all but 15 of 133 Parkview students in grades 9–11 also switched to other board high schools after their lower-city vocational school closed last June, with 21 Grade 12s coming back for a victory lap.

Among those who would have gone to Parkview, Mountain Secondary took in the most students at 137, with 28 switching to Delta, Glendale or Sir John A. Macdonald.

Reinholdt said all Parkview programs are available at Mountain except for auto, replaced by a small-engine repairs program introduced this semester.

Apart from the kitchen, most equipment from Parkview was also moved to Mountain, which already had its own kitchen for a hospitality and food services program, she said.

Reinholdt said the board added two full-time guidance counselors to help Parkview students deal with the stress of moving to Mountain, positions that will remain in place next year at the Caledon Avenue school, scheduled to close in June 2017.

She said how students are doing academically will become clearer once the board assesses the results of recent exams and attendance rates.

“It will be a good snapshot,” she said.

Trustee Larry Pattison, whose Ward 3 included the since-demolished Parkview, said he continues to hear “a lot of concerns” about the closure and transition of students.

The program committee unanimously backed his recommendation to create a post-transition committee of parents, students and staff to provide feedback on the closure experience and recommend any changes for future closures.

Hamilton public board kept most Hill Park students, top boss says

News Feb 26, 2015 Hamilton Mountain News

By Richard Leitner, News Staff

Closing Hill Park Secondary School didn’t prompt a big exodus of students from Hamilton’s public school board, its interim education director says.

Pam Reinholdt said all but 19 of 373 Hill Park students in grades 9 to 11 switched to other board high schools this year, typically choosing the one closest to where they live.

Sixty-two of 205 students in Grade 12 also returned for “what the kids call a victory lap,” she told members of the board’s program committee.

Among those who would have attended Hill Park had it remained open, Sir Allan MacNab took in the most students at 162, followed by Henderson (formerly Barton) at 151, Sherwood at 86, Westmount at 22 and Ancaster at 4.

Delta, Westdale and Sir Winston Churchill each took in one student.

“These retention rates are actually very good. They’re not any different than they would be in any of our high schools and probably would be consistent with most boards,” Reinholdt said.

“Kids switch boards, switch schools, move, a number of things, so we were pleased.”

Board enrolment figures show all but 15 of 133 Parkview students in grades 9–11 also switched to other board high schools after their lower-city vocational school closed last June, with 21 Grade 12s coming back for a victory lap.

Among those who would have gone to Parkview, Mountain Secondary took in the most students at 137, with 28 switching to Delta, Glendale or Sir John A. Macdonald.

Reinholdt said all Parkview programs are available at Mountain except for auto, replaced by a small-engine repairs program introduced this semester.

Apart from the kitchen, most equipment from Parkview was also moved to Mountain, which already had its own kitchen for a hospitality and food services program, she said.

Reinholdt said the board added two full-time guidance counselors to help Parkview students deal with the stress of moving to Mountain, positions that will remain in place next year at the Caledon Avenue school, scheduled to close in June 2017.

She said how students are doing academically will become clearer once the board assesses the results of recent exams and attendance rates.

“It will be a good snapshot,” she said.

Trustee Larry Pattison, whose Ward 3 included the since-demolished Parkview, said he continues to hear “a lot of concerns” about the closure and transition of students.

The program committee unanimously backed his recommendation to create a post-transition committee of parents, students and staff to provide feedback on the closure experience and recommend any changes for future closures.

Hamilton public board kept most Hill Park students, top boss says

News Feb 26, 2015 Hamilton Mountain News

By Richard Leitner, News Staff

Closing Hill Park Secondary School didn’t prompt a big exodus of students from Hamilton’s public school board, its interim education director says.

Pam Reinholdt said all but 19 of 373 Hill Park students in grades 9 to 11 switched to other board high schools this year, typically choosing the one closest to where they live.

Sixty-two of 205 students in Grade 12 also returned for “what the kids call a victory lap,” she told members of the board’s program committee.

Among those who would have attended Hill Park had it remained open, Sir Allan MacNab took in the most students at 162, followed by Henderson (formerly Barton) at 151, Sherwood at 86, Westmount at 22 and Ancaster at 4.

Delta, Westdale and Sir Winston Churchill each took in one student.

“These retention rates are actually very good. They’re not any different than they would be in any of our high schools and probably would be consistent with most boards,” Reinholdt said.

“Kids switch boards, switch schools, move, a number of things, so we were pleased.”

Board enrolment figures show all but 15 of 133 Parkview students in grades 9–11 also switched to other board high schools after their lower-city vocational school closed last June, with 21 Grade 12s coming back for a victory lap.

Among those who would have gone to Parkview, Mountain Secondary took in the most students at 137, with 28 switching to Delta, Glendale or Sir John A. Macdonald.

Reinholdt said all Parkview programs are available at Mountain except for auto, replaced by a small-engine repairs program introduced this semester.

Apart from the kitchen, most equipment from Parkview was also moved to Mountain, which already had its own kitchen for a hospitality and food services program, she said.

Reinholdt said the board added two full-time guidance counselors to help Parkview students deal with the stress of moving to Mountain, positions that will remain in place next year at the Caledon Avenue school, scheduled to close in June 2017.

She said how students are doing academically will become clearer once the board assesses the results of recent exams and attendance rates.

“It will be a good snapshot,” she said.

Trustee Larry Pattison, whose Ward 3 included the since-demolished Parkview, said he continues to hear “a lot of concerns” about the closure and transition of students.

The program committee unanimously backed his recommendation to create a post-transition committee of parents, students and staff to provide feedback on the closure experience and recommend any changes for future closures.