Hamilton chapter of group that saves Louisiana Labs holding fundraiser March 27

News Feb 17, 2015 Hamilton Mountain News

By Gord Bowes, News staff

The third annual fundraiser for a group that rescues Hurricane Katrina dogs is coming up next month.

There are a lot of expenses involved in getting dogs to a new home, says Sheila Taylor of the local branch of NOLA (New Orleans, La.) Lab Rescue.

Money is needed to pay for food, fuel to transport dogs to new homes or veterinary appointments, and to cover the cost of vet treatments,

“It’s all volunteer-based — not a single person on payroll,” says Taylor. “Everybody pitches in and somehow we make it work.”

NOLA, which has branches in Louisiana, Michigan, New York, Colorado, Illinois and Ontario, is a group with dozens of volunteers who rescue Labrador retrievers from the southern U.S., where euthanasia rates are high. More than 280 Labs have found a new home in Canada.

A Night for the Dogs, the third annual fundraiser for NOLA Lab Rescue, takes place March 27 at Marquis Gardens, 1050 Rymal Rd. East. Tickets are $30; email amaracle@rogers.com or see nolalabrescue.org for more information.

Taylor, a Mountain resident, says the group finds it tough to raise money because it encounters many people who would rather give to human charities, not ones focused on animals.

But rescuing animals from dire situations also benefits people, she notes.

She relates the story of a woman who was displaced by Hurricane Katrina and forced to live in her car, which meant giving up her beloved Biscuit, who was too old to get in and out of the vehicle. The woman found out about NOLA and wrote to the group.

“I would rather give my dog up than to have my dog suffer,” she wrote, requesting help finding someone to foster Biscuit for a couple of weeks while she got her life in order.

Members of NOLA got together to help the woman and found her free temporary residence in a nearby city where she could keep Biscuit with her.

Biscuit died during the process, but the woman was able to get her life back in order and currently volunteers with NOLA by fostering dogs and transporting them to their new homes.

“She’s giving back because she can’t believe how much we stepped in to help her,” says Taylor.

Hamilton chapter of group that saves Louisiana Labs holding fundraiser March 27

News Feb 17, 2015 Hamilton Mountain News

By Gord Bowes, News staff

The third annual fundraiser for a group that rescues Hurricane Katrina dogs is coming up next month.

There are a lot of expenses involved in getting dogs to a new home, says Sheila Taylor of the local branch of NOLA (New Orleans, La.) Lab Rescue.

Money is needed to pay for food, fuel to transport dogs to new homes or veterinary appointments, and to cover the cost of vet treatments,

“It’s all volunteer-based — not a single person on payroll,” says Taylor. “Everybody pitches in and somehow we make it work.”

NOLA, which has branches in Louisiana, Michigan, New York, Colorado, Illinois and Ontario, is a group with dozens of volunteers who rescue Labrador retrievers from the southern U.S., where euthanasia rates are high. More than 280 Labs have found a new home in Canada.

A Night for the Dogs, the third annual fundraiser for NOLA Lab Rescue, takes place March 27 at Marquis Gardens, 1050 Rymal Rd. East. Tickets are $30; email amaracle@rogers.com or see nolalabrescue.org for more information.

Taylor, a Mountain resident, says the group finds it tough to raise money because it encounters many people who would rather give to human charities, not ones focused on animals.

But rescuing animals from dire situations also benefits people, she notes.

She relates the story of a woman who was displaced by Hurricane Katrina and forced to live in her car, which meant giving up her beloved Biscuit, who was too old to get in and out of the vehicle. The woman found out about NOLA and wrote to the group.

“I would rather give my dog up than to have my dog suffer,” she wrote, requesting help finding someone to foster Biscuit for a couple of weeks while she got her life in order.

Members of NOLA got together to help the woman and found her free temporary residence in a nearby city where she could keep Biscuit with her.

Biscuit died during the process, but the woman was able to get her life back in order and currently volunteers with NOLA by fostering dogs and transporting them to their new homes.

“She’s giving back because she can’t believe how much we stepped in to help her,” says Taylor.

Hamilton chapter of group that saves Louisiana Labs holding fundraiser March 27

News Feb 17, 2015 Hamilton Mountain News

By Gord Bowes, News staff

The third annual fundraiser for a group that rescues Hurricane Katrina dogs is coming up next month.

There are a lot of expenses involved in getting dogs to a new home, says Sheila Taylor of the local branch of NOLA (New Orleans, La.) Lab Rescue.

Money is needed to pay for food, fuel to transport dogs to new homes or veterinary appointments, and to cover the cost of vet treatments,

“It’s all volunteer-based — not a single person on payroll,” says Taylor. “Everybody pitches in and somehow we make it work.”

NOLA, which has branches in Louisiana, Michigan, New York, Colorado, Illinois and Ontario, is a group with dozens of volunteers who rescue Labrador retrievers from the southern U.S., where euthanasia rates are high. More than 280 Labs have found a new home in Canada.

A Night for the Dogs, the third annual fundraiser for NOLA Lab Rescue, takes place March 27 at Marquis Gardens, 1050 Rymal Rd. East. Tickets are $30; email amaracle@rogers.com or see nolalabrescue.org for more information.

Taylor, a Mountain resident, says the group finds it tough to raise money because it encounters many people who would rather give to human charities, not ones focused on animals.

But rescuing animals from dire situations also benefits people, she notes.

She relates the story of a woman who was displaced by Hurricane Katrina and forced to live in her car, which meant giving up her beloved Biscuit, who was too old to get in and out of the vehicle. The woman found out about NOLA and wrote to the group.

“I would rather give my dog up than to have my dog suffer,” she wrote, requesting help finding someone to foster Biscuit for a couple of weeks while she got her life in order.

Members of NOLA got together to help the woman and found her free temporary residence in a nearby city where she could keep Biscuit with her.

Biscuit died during the process, but the woman was able to get her life back in order and currently volunteers with NOLA by fostering dogs and transporting them to their new homes.

“She’s giving back because she can’t believe how much we stepped in to help her,” says Taylor.