Reinholdt steps in as Hamilton board's second interim boss

News Feb 09, 2015 Hamilton Mountain News

By Richard Leitner, News Staff

Executive superintendent Pam Reinholdt is taking over as the Hamilton public school board’s interim education director, replacing Wayne Joudrie, who stepped down for undisclosed health reasons after just a month on the job.

Board chair Todd White said Joudrie, who came out of retirement to take the temporary post, “gave it his all” during his short stay, helping trustees to come together as a group.

He said although the circumstances of his departure are unfortunate, trustees are glad Reinholdt is stepping in as they search for a permanent director to replace John Malloy, who left in December to become a deputy minister at the Ministry of Education.

Reinholdt, who in joined the board 2001 after senior stints in Haldimand and Toronto, already oversaw the board’s six school superintendents, implementation of the secondary program strategy and safe-schools efforts.

White said she’s made it clear she doesn’t want the job permanently.

“She really is the natural choice internally,” he said. “She has the respect of all the trustees and exec council.”

Her appointment comes as trustees have rethought their plan to hire a single facilitator to help them search for a new director and set their strategic directions for the coming term.

White said tenders submitted by a Feb. 3 noon deadline for the combined job fell shy of expectations and firms will now be invited to bid on separate contracts for the two tasks.

He said the number of bids received remains confidential, but the issue was “quantity, not quality” and it’s still possible one firm will get the contract for both tasks.

“We want to increase our pool of options. By splitting them, we can see more clearly who’s out there provincially that are experts in strategic directions and which agencies are experts on director search,” White said.

“They’re not dependent on each other. However, there are, as we’ve stated in the past, synergies that we may learn through our strategic directions consultations that may inform trustees of the value and qualities that we’re looking for in a director.”

West Mountain trustee Wes Hicks, who opposed hiring a facilitator for both tasks, said he’s happy the contracts are now being split but still believes trustees should first hire a director to review existing strategic directions.

He said he doesn’t expect major changes to those directions, which include valuing achievement, engagement and equity, and a focus on early literacy and ensuring all students graduate.

“They’re putting the cart before the horse,” Hicks said.

White said trustees still hope to hire a new director by the end of the school year and approve their strategic directions by next January to help them set priorities for the 2016-17 budget.

Both he and Hicks said they don’t yet know how much the consulting contracts will cost.

“The focus of discussions was the pool and the number of applicants,” White said.

“Obviously, as we do get further into the RFP (tender) process in camera, we’ll start looking at cost, as that is a significant factor.”

Reinholdt steps in as Hamilton board's second interim boss

News Feb 09, 2015 Hamilton Mountain News

By Richard Leitner, News Staff

Executive superintendent Pam Reinholdt is taking over as the Hamilton public school board’s interim education director, replacing Wayne Joudrie, who stepped down for undisclosed health reasons after just a month on the job.

Board chair Todd White said Joudrie, who came out of retirement to take the temporary post, “gave it his all” during his short stay, helping trustees to come together as a group.

He said although the circumstances of his departure are unfortunate, trustees are glad Reinholdt is stepping in as they search for a permanent director to replace John Malloy, who left in December to become a deputy minister at the Ministry of Education.

Reinholdt, who in joined the board 2001 after senior stints in Haldimand and Toronto, already oversaw the board’s six school superintendents, implementation of the secondary program strategy and safe-schools efforts.

White said she’s made it clear she doesn’t want the job permanently.

“She really is the natural choice internally,” he said. “She has the respect of all the trustees and exec council.”

Her appointment comes as trustees have rethought their plan to hire a single facilitator to help them search for a new director and set their strategic directions for the coming term.

White said tenders submitted by a Feb. 3 noon deadline for the combined job fell shy of expectations and firms will now be invited to bid on separate contracts for the two tasks.

He said the number of bids received remains confidential, but the issue was “quantity, not quality” and it’s still possible one firm will get the contract for both tasks.

“We want to increase our pool of options. By splitting them, we can see more clearly who’s out there provincially that are experts in strategic directions and which agencies are experts on director search,” White said.

“They’re not dependent on each other. However, there are, as we’ve stated in the past, synergies that we may learn through our strategic directions consultations that may inform trustees of the value and qualities that we’re looking for in a director.”

West Mountain trustee Wes Hicks, who opposed hiring a facilitator for both tasks, said he’s happy the contracts are now being split but still believes trustees should first hire a director to review existing strategic directions.

He said he doesn’t expect major changes to those directions, which include valuing achievement, engagement and equity, and a focus on early literacy and ensuring all students graduate.

“They’re putting the cart before the horse,” Hicks said.

White said trustees still hope to hire a new director by the end of the school year and approve their strategic directions by next January to help them set priorities for the 2016-17 budget.

Both he and Hicks said they don’t yet know how much the consulting contracts will cost.

“The focus of discussions was the pool and the number of applicants,” White said.

“Obviously, as we do get further into the RFP (tender) process in camera, we’ll start looking at cost, as that is a significant factor.”

Reinholdt steps in as Hamilton board's second interim boss

News Feb 09, 2015 Hamilton Mountain News

By Richard Leitner, News Staff

Executive superintendent Pam Reinholdt is taking over as the Hamilton public school board’s interim education director, replacing Wayne Joudrie, who stepped down for undisclosed health reasons after just a month on the job.

Board chair Todd White said Joudrie, who came out of retirement to take the temporary post, “gave it his all” during his short stay, helping trustees to come together as a group.

He said although the circumstances of his departure are unfortunate, trustees are glad Reinholdt is stepping in as they search for a permanent director to replace John Malloy, who left in December to become a deputy minister at the Ministry of Education.

Reinholdt, who in joined the board 2001 after senior stints in Haldimand and Toronto, already oversaw the board’s six school superintendents, implementation of the secondary program strategy and safe-schools efforts.

White said she’s made it clear she doesn’t want the job permanently.

“She really is the natural choice internally,” he said. “She has the respect of all the trustees and exec council.”

Her appointment comes as trustees have rethought their plan to hire a single facilitator to help them search for a new director and set their strategic directions for the coming term.

White said tenders submitted by a Feb. 3 noon deadline for the combined job fell shy of expectations and firms will now be invited to bid on separate contracts for the two tasks.

He said the number of bids received remains confidential, but the issue was “quantity, not quality” and it’s still possible one firm will get the contract for both tasks.

“We want to increase our pool of options. By splitting them, we can see more clearly who’s out there provincially that are experts in strategic directions and which agencies are experts on director search,” White said.

“They’re not dependent on each other. However, there are, as we’ve stated in the past, synergies that we may learn through our strategic directions consultations that may inform trustees of the value and qualities that we’re looking for in a director.”

West Mountain trustee Wes Hicks, who opposed hiring a facilitator for both tasks, said he’s happy the contracts are now being split but still believes trustees should first hire a director to review existing strategic directions.

He said he doesn’t expect major changes to those directions, which include valuing achievement, engagement and equity, and a focus on early literacy and ensuring all students graduate.

“They’re putting the cart before the horse,” Hicks said.

White said trustees still hope to hire a new director by the end of the school year and approve their strategic directions by next January to help them set priorities for the 2016-17 budget.

Both he and Hicks said they don’t yet know how much the consulting contracts will cost.

“The focus of discussions was the pool and the number of applicants,” White said.

“Obviously, as we do get further into the RFP (tender) process in camera, we’ll start looking at cost, as that is a significant factor.”