Hamilton continues fight as Canada Post unveils 1,000 superbox sites

News Jan 27, 2015 Hamilton Mountain News

By Gord Bowes, News staff

The city’s options to battle Canada Post’s move away from home delivery will be laid out in a report council will receive next Wednesday.

The report is expected to outline the city’s chances in a legal challenge against the Crown corporation on being forced to accommodate super mailboxes on public property.

It may also suggest a bylaw that sets out exact conditions which Canada Post must abide to in order to place a community mailbox.

East Mountain councillor Tom Jackson said he hasn’t seen the final report, but expects to hear from staff that there is a 50-50 chance of stopping the Crown corporation in court.

Ward 7 councillor Scott Duvall isn’t as optimistic.

“They have the right to do anything they want as the federal government,” Duvall said, and municipalities don’t get a say.

Mountain residents who are losing home mail delivery found out last week where the super mailbox near them would be located.

Canada Post spokesman John Hamilton said about 1,000 community mail boxes will be installed in the spring.

Shortly after, roughly 36,500 homes on the Mountain and in upper Stoney Creek will have to go to a communal site to get their mail as part of Canada Post’s five-year nationwide phaseout of home delivery.

City council condemned the cancellation of home delivery and requested the report before last October’s municipal election. The city solicitor and general manager were asked to present measures the city could take to oppose Canada Post’s move.

Council could vote on Feb. 11 to take legal action, enact a bylaw governing the boxes or take no action at all.

In the event the city can’t stop the conversion, Jackson said, as part of a Plan B he has been working with homeowners who have complaints about boxes near their homes.

The councillor said Canada Post has changed locations for 28 of 50 sites constituents complained about. They were moved for a variety of reasons, such as being located in a No Stopping zone or blocking motorists’ sight lines at a corner.

Canada Post’s Hamilton says the Crown corporation has listened to all feedback since the end of delivery was announced last summer.

“We take the input that we receive from the community very seriously,” he said. “Sometimes it’s a matter of just moving the location a few feet in one direction or the other, sometimes it’s a matter of looking at alternatives, trying to find the safest and most convenient location.”

Duvall said he’s hearing a different story from his constituents.

“They’re pretty upset,” he said. Many residents are not even getting a call back from Canada Post about their concerns.

A public meeting on the end of home mail delivery is coming up Feb. 18 at 6:30 p.m. at Sackville Hill Senior Recreation Centre.

“People will get a good, clear understanding of what is going on,” said Duvall.

Hamilton continues fight as Canada Post unveils 1,000 superbox sites

News Jan 27, 2015 Hamilton Mountain News

By Gord Bowes, News staff

The city’s options to battle Canada Post’s move away from home delivery will be laid out in a report council will receive next Wednesday.

The report is expected to outline the city’s chances in a legal challenge against the Crown corporation on being forced to accommodate super mailboxes on public property.

It may also suggest a bylaw that sets out exact conditions which Canada Post must abide to in order to place a community mailbox.

East Mountain councillor Tom Jackson said he hasn’t seen the final report, but expects to hear from staff that there is a 50-50 chance of stopping the Crown corporation in court.

Ward 7 councillor Scott Duvall isn’t as optimistic.

“They have the right to do anything they want as the federal government,” Duvall said, and municipalities don’t get a say.

Mountain residents who are losing home mail delivery found out last week where the super mailbox near them would be located.

Canada Post spokesman John Hamilton said about 1,000 community mail boxes will be installed in the spring.

Shortly after, roughly 36,500 homes on the Mountain and in upper Stoney Creek will have to go to a communal site to get their mail as part of Canada Post’s five-year nationwide phaseout of home delivery.

City council condemned the cancellation of home delivery and requested the report before last October’s municipal election. The city solicitor and general manager were asked to present measures the city could take to oppose Canada Post’s move.

Council could vote on Feb. 11 to take legal action, enact a bylaw governing the boxes or take no action at all.

In the event the city can’t stop the conversion, Jackson said, as part of a Plan B he has been working with homeowners who have complaints about boxes near their homes.

The councillor said Canada Post has changed locations for 28 of 50 sites constituents complained about. They were moved for a variety of reasons, such as being located in a No Stopping zone or blocking motorists’ sight lines at a corner.

Canada Post’s Hamilton says the Crown corporation has listened to all feedback since the end of delivery was announced last summer.

“We take the input that we receive from the community very seriously,” he said. “Sometimes it’s a matter of just moving the location a few feet in one direction or the other, sometimes it’s a matter of looking at alternatives, trying to find the safest and most convenient location.”

Duvall said he’s hearing a different story from his constituents.

“They’re pretty upset,” he said. Many residents are not even getting a call back from Canada Post about their concerns.

A public meeting on the end of home mail delivery is coming up Feb. 18 at 6:30 p.m. at Sackville Hill Senior Recreation Centre.

“People will get a good, clear understanding of what is going on,” said Duvall.

Hamilton continues fight as Canada Post unveils 1,000 superbox sites

News Jan 27, 2015 Hamilton Mountain News

By Gord Bowes, News staff

The city’s options to battle Canada Post’s move away from home delivery will be laid out in a report council will receive next Wednesday.

The report is expected to outline the city’s chances in a legal challenge against the Crown corporation on being forced to accommodate super mailboxes on public property.

It may also suggest a bylaw that sets out exact conditions which Canada Post must abide to in order to place a community mailbox.

East Mountain councillor Tom Jackson said he hasn’t seen the final report, but expects to hear from staff that there is a 50-50 chance of stopping the Crown corporation in court.

Ward 7 councillor Scott Duvall isn’t as optimistic.

“They have the right to do anything they want as the federal government,” Duvall said, and municipalities don’t get a say.

Mountain residents who are losing home mail delivery found out last week where the super mailbox near them would be located.

Canada Post spokesman John Hamilton said about 1,000 community mail boxes will be installed in the spring.

Shortly after, roughly 36,500 homes on the Mountain and in upper Stoney Creek will have to go to a communal site to get their mail as part of Canada Post’s five-year nationwide phaseout of home delivery.

City council condemned the cancellation of home delivery and requested the report before last October’s municipal election. The city solicitor and general manager were asked to present measures the city could take to oppose Canada Post’s move.

Council could vote on Feb. 11 to take legal action, enact a bylaw governing the boxes or take no action at all.

In the event the city can’t stop the conversion, Jackson said, as part of a Plan B he has been working with homeowners who have complaints about boxes near their homes.

The councillor said Canada Post has changed locations for 28 of 50 sites constituents complained about. They were moved for a variety of reasons, such as being located in a No Stopping zone or blocking motorists’ sight lines at a corner.

Canada Post’s Hamilton says the Crown corporation has listened to all feedback since the end of delivery was announced last summer.

“We take the input that we receive from the community very seriously,” he said. “Sometimes it’s a matter of just moving the location a few feet in one direction or the other, sometimes it’s a matter of looking at alternatives, trying to find the safest and most convenient location.”

Duvall said he’s hearing a different story from his constituents.

“They’re pretty upset,” he said. Many residents are not even getting a call back from Canada Post about their concerns.

A public meeting on the end of home mail delivery is coming up Feb. 18 at 6:30 p.m. at Sackville Hill Senior Recreation Centre.

“People will get a good, clear understanding of what is going on,” said Duvall.