Editorial: A year of hope

News Dec 30, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

After the year that 2014 produced, it isn’t surprising that some people are waiting for 2015 with a mixture of hope and foreboding.

Sometimes a year in time is called a “watershed” in that society’s development. For better or worse, 2014 would seem to be that pinnacle or nadir depending upon your perspective on how we as a people have developed. You don’t have to look too far to see from the deaths of Canadian Armed Forces personnel, including Hamilton’s own Cpl. Nathan Cirllio as one unhinged individual invaded Parliament, that 2014 was a historically-laded period. But individual-inspired violence wasn’t the only thing that galvanized the public. Canada’s own Jian Ghomeshi highlighted how we as a society react to violence directed at women. Sexual assault and violence have  also been alleged by MPs in Ottawa, by the unsavory allegations being made against comedic icon Bill Cosby, and by the graphic video showing NFL football player Ray Rice hitting his wife.

And violence also became a recurring them against minorities as black males were killed by police in Ferguson, Mo., and New York City. It was only more striking when grand juries in both communities decided not to indict the white police officers for the deaths, touching off continuing protests that have touched an emotional nerve across North America.

The violence, death, racism, assaults, and the omnipresence of the government manifested in the police and military, would make anyone believe that the apocalypse is just around the corner. If 2013 was the year when individual privacy was a fallacy in the face of repressive government secrecy, 2014 proved that we as a society haven’t moved too far from a Middle Ages mindset where the basic human instincts reins supreme.

Still, there is always hope in the heart. As William Shakespeare says: “It is not in the stars to hold our destiny but in ourselves.”

In that vain, here are a few things that we would like to see happen in 2015:

•That Hamilton politicians and officials learn from the last election, and create a forum where residents can share their opinions that are taken seriously;

•That governments understand that being open and transparent is better than being opaque and secret. That includes all levels of government, and politicians especially at the municipal level, where secrecy and old boys’ politics still rule;

•That all people are held accountable for their actions, especially when it comes to violence against all individuals. That may seem obvious, but in today’s society it doesn’t happen.

•And finally, what we truly would like to see is a Hamilton that can do one good thing for the betterment of the entire community.

Editorial: A year of hope

News Dec 30, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

After the year that 2014 produced, it isn’t surprising that some people are waiting for 2015 with a mixture of hope and foreboding.

Sometimes a year in time is called a “watershed” in that society’s development. For better or worse, 2014 would seem to be that pinnacle or nadir depending upon your perspective on how we as a people have developed. You don’t have to look too far to see from the deaths of Canadian Armed Forces personnel, including Hamilton’s own Cpl. Nathan Cirllio as one unhinged individual invaded Parliament, that 2014 was a historically-laded period. But individual-inspired violence wasn’t the only thing that galvanized the public. Canada’s own Jian Ghomeshi highlighted how we as a society react to violence directed at women. Sexual assault and violence have  also been alleged by MPs in Ottawa, by the unsavory allegations being made against comedic icon Bill Cosby, and by the graphic video showing NFL football player Ray Rice hitting his wife.

And violence also became a recurring them against minorities as black males were killed by police in Ferguson, Mo., and New York City. It was only more striking when grand juries in both communities decided not to indict the white police officers for the deaths, touching off continuing protests that have touched an emotional nerve across North America.

The violence, death, racism, assaults, and the omnipresence of the government manifested in the police and military, would make anyone believe that the apocalypse is just around the corner. If 2013 was the year when individual privacy was a fallacy in the face of repressive government secrecy, 2014 proved that we as a society haven’t moved too far from a Middle Ages mindset where the basic human instincts reins supreme.

Still, there is always hope in the heart. As William Shakespeare says: “It is not in the stars to hold our destiny but in ourselves.”

In that vain, here are a few things that we would like to see happen in 2015:

•That Hamilton politicians and officials learn from the last election, and create a forum where residents can share their opinions that are taken seriously;

•That governments understand that being open and transparent is better than being opaque and secret. That includes all levels of government, and politicians especially at the municipal level, where secrecy and old boys’ politics still rule;

•That all people are held accountable for their actions, especially when it comes to violence against all individuals. That may seem obvious, but in today’s society it doesn’t happen.

•And finally, what we truly would like to see is a Hamilton that can do one good thing for the betterment of the entire community.

Editorial: A year of hope

News Dec 30, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

After the year that 2014 produced, it isn’t surprising that some people are waiting for 2015 with a mixture of hope and foreboding.

Sometimes a year in time is called a “watershed” in that society’s development. For better or worse, 2014 would seem to be that pinnacle or nadir depending upon your perspective on how we as a people have developed. You don’t have to look too far to see from the deaths of Canadian Armed Forces personnel, including Hamilton’s own Cpl. Nathan Cirllio as one unhinged individual invaded Parliament, that 2014 was a historically-laded period. But individual-inspired violence wasn’t the only thing that galvanized the public. Canada’s own Jian Ghomeshi highlighted how we as a society react to violence directed at women. Sexual assault and violence have  also been alleged by MPs in Ottawa, by the unsavory allegations being made against comedic icon Bill Cosby, and by the graphic video showing NFL football player Ray Rice hitting his wife.

And violence also became a recurring them against minorities as black males were killed by police in Ferguson, Mo., and New York City. It was only more striking when grand juries in both communities decided not to indict the white police officers for the deaths, touching off continuing protests that have touched an emotional nerve across North America.

The violence, death, racism, assaults, and the omnipresence of the government manifested in the police and military, would make anyone believe that the apocalypse is just around the corner. If 2013 was the year when individual privacy was a fallacy in the face of repressive government secrecy, 2014 proved that we as a society haven’t moved too far from a Middle Ages mindset where the basic human instincts reins supreme.

Still, there is always hope in the heart. As William Shakespeare says: “It is not in the stars to hold our destiny but in ourselves.”

In that vain, here are a few things that we would like to see happen in 2015:

•That Hamilton politicians and officials learn from the last election, and create a forum where residents can share their opinions that are taken seriously;

•That governments understand that being open and transparent is better than being opaque and secret. That includes all levels of government, and politicians especially at the municipal level, where secrecy and old boys’ politics still rule;

•That all people are held accountable for their actions, especially when it comes to violence against all individuals. That may seem obvious, but in today’s society it doesn’t happen.

•And finally, what we truly would like to see is a Hamilton that can do one good thing for the betterment of the entire community.