Wanted: Lobbyist registrar/integrity commissioner for Hamilton

News Dec 15, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

 By Kevin Werner, News Staff

 Hamilton staff and politicians will begin interviewing candidates to become the city’s first combine lobbyist registrar and integrity commissioner starting next February or March.

An interview panel has been created that will include City Manager Chris Murray,  the city clerk, city solicitor, and three members of council, including Ancaster councillor Lloyd Ferguson and Ward 1 councillor Aidan Johnson.

After extensive debate, councillors last September agreed in a 12 to 4 vote to create a lobbyist registry, and combine the position with the current integrity commissioner responsibilities.Hamiltonmodeled the registrar and integrity commissioner position after Ottawa’s. Toronto and Ottawa are the only other municipalities to have lobbyist registries.

Former mayor Bob Bratina, along with councillors Rob Pasuta, Terry Whitehead and Tom Jackson all voted against the recommendation at the time.

The annual cost of the integrity commissioner is budgeted at $18,000 on an annual retainer, plus $150 per hour, for a total annual cost of about $50,000. The city’s current integrity commissioner is Earl Basse, who has been criticized by some politicians for his slow response to requests to investigate incidents and for missing deadlines. The city created the integrity commissioner in 2008.

For the lobbyist registrar, the estimated cost is budgeted at $7,000 on a yearly retainer, plus $150 per hour, for a total salary of about $22,000.

The new lobbyist registrar/integrity commissioner will begin Aug. 1, 2015. The position will be reviewed after two years.

The Hamilton and Flamborough chambers of commerce both opposed the idea of the city implementing a registry during the debate last September, arguing it will scare away businesses.

The registry bylaw includes a so-called “black-out period” where companies can keep their meetings at city hall secret. Beyond that stipulation, lobbyists will have to register who they are meeting with, the general time period and the subject matter with the city. The information will then be posted on the city’s website.

Wanted: Lobbyist registrar/integrity commissioner for Hamilton

News Dec 15, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

 By Kevin Werner, News Staff

 Hamilton staff and politicians will begin interviewing candidates to become the city’s first combine lobbyist registrar and integrity commissioner starting next February or March.

An interview panel has been created that will include City Manager Chris Murray,  the city clerk, city solicitor, and three members of council, including Ancaster councillor Lloyd Ferguson and Ward 1 councillor Aidan Johnson.

After extensive debate, councillors last September agreed in a 12 to 4 vote to create a lobbyist registry, and combine the position with the current integrity commissioner responsibilities.Hamiltonmodeled the registrar and integrity commissioner position after Ottawa’s. Toronto and Ottawa are the only other municipalities to have lobbyist registries.

Former mayor Bob Bratina, along with councillors Rob Pasuta, Terry Whitehead and Tom Jackson all voted against the recommendation at the time.

The annual cost of the integrity commissioner is budgeted at $18,000 on an annual retainer, plus $150 per hour, for a total annual cost of about $50,000. The city’s current integrity commissioner is Earl Basse, who has been criticized by some politicians for his slow response to requests to investigate incidents and for missing deadlines. The city created the integrity commissioner in 2008.

For the lobbyist registrar, the estimated cost is budgeted at $7,000 on a yearly retainer, plus $150 per hour, for a total salary of about $22,000.

The new lobbyist registrar/integrity commissioner will begin Aug. 1, 2015. The position will be reviewed after two years.

The Hamilton and Flamborough chambers of commerce both opposed the idea of the city implementing a registry during the debate last September, arguing it will scare away businesses.

The registry bylaw includes a so-called “black-out period” where companies can keep their meetings at city hall secret. Beyond that stipulation, lobbyists will have to register who they are meeting with, the general time period and the subject matter with the city. The information will then be posted on the city’s website.

Wanted: Lobbyist registrar/integrity commissioner for Hamilton

News Dec 15, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

 By Kevin Werner, News Staff

 Hamilton staff and politicians will begin interviewing candidates to become the city’s first combine lobbyist registrar and integrity commissioner starting next February or March.

An interview panel has been created that will include City Manager Chris Murray,  the city clerk, city solicitor, and three members of council, including Ancaster councillor Lloyd Ferguson and Ward 1 councillor Aidan Johnson.

After extensive debate, councillors last September agreed in a 12 to 4 vote to create a lobbyist registry, and combine the position with the current integrity commissioner responsibilities.Hamiltonmodeled the registrar and integrity commissioner position after Ottawa’s. Toronto and Ottawa are the only other municipalities to have lobbyist registries.

Former mayor Bob Bratina, along with councillors Rob Pasuta, Terry Whitehead and Tom Jackson all voted against the recommendation at the time.

The annual cost of the integrity commissioner is budgeted at $18,000 on an annual retainer, plus $150 per hour, for a total annual cost of about $50,000. The city’s current integrity commissioner is Earl Basse, who has been criticized by some politicians for his slow response to requests to investigate incidents and for missing deadlines. The city created the integrity commissioner in 2008.

For the lobbyist registrar, the estimated cost is budgeted at $7,000 on a yearly retainer, plus $150 per hour, for a total salary of about $22,000.

The new lobbyist registrar/integrity commissioner will begin Aug. 1, 2015. The position will be reviewed after two years.

The Hamilton and Flamborough chambers of commerce both opposed the idea of the city implementing a registry during the debate last September, arguing it will scare away businesses.

The registry bylaw includes a so-called “black-out period” where companies can keep their meetings at city hall secret. Beyond that stipulation, lobbyists will have to register who they are meeting with, the general time period and the subject matter with the city. The information will then be posted on the city’s website.