Hamiltonians remember Montreal Massacre

News Dec 06, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

 By Kevin Werner, News Staff

 After 25 years when a gunman shot down 14 women at the Ecole Polytechnique in Montreal during his 20-minute carnage, women are still subjected to fear, assault and intimidation, say politicians.

“Not enough has changed,” said Ontario NDP leader Andrea Horwath, during a ceremony Dec. 6 at the Native Women’s Centre on the Mountain to remember the slain women in Montreal, and the hundreds of Ontario women and girls that have died over the last few years.

Hamiltonwas one of a number of Canadian cities that held vigils for the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women. The event was enshrined after Parliament voted on a motion by Dawn Black, NDP MP in 1991. Hamilton City Hall was bathed in red by the YWCA  to symbolize a call for the end of violence against women.

Horwath told the 80 people who turned out for the two-hour event  that most women are trapped in violent relationships and have no where to turn. She said there is not enough shelters, limited affordable housing, and they are living in poverty working dead-end jobs making their escape from a violent relationship difficult.

And women face the threat of violence not only at home, but when they attend school and work, she said. Horwath said when the tragedy in Montreal occurred she compared her life and feminist beliefs to those women who were killed.

“Women are still experiencing sexual violence today, tomorrow and the day after that,” she said.

“It’s 25 years. It’s time we commit to real change. It’s time to realize if you don’t make that commitment our sisters will continue to be hurt and murdered,” said Horwath.

Chris Charlton, Hamilton Mountain NDP MP was equally frustrated at the limited effort that has been made since Marc Lepine gun down those women, and then killed himself after ranting that feminists had spoiled his life.

“We made damn little progress to women and girls to walk safely on our streets, live securely in their homes and participate fully as equals in our society,” said Charlton. “I want all of us to rise up in anger to finally re-commit, enough is enough. Let’s stop violence against women.”

HamiltonPolice Det.-Sgt. Dave Hennick reinforced the view that women continue to bear the brunt of violence at the hands of men. This year police have responded to over 5,800 incidents of domestic violence, or about 17 calls each day, he said. There have also been over 400 sexual assaults this year that have been investigated by the police. He said 1,100 individuals have been charged.

“(The numbers) continue to rise,” he said.

Hamilton Centre NDP MP David Christopherson says women will continue to be hurt and murdered if men don’t take responsibility for their actions. He said men have to get the message to refrain from making  jokes that are not funny, and to speak up against violence against women.

“We can not eliminate violence in our society against women until every man gets the message,” he said.

The event, which included lighting a candle for the victims of the Montreal massacre, singing, artwork and a woman talking about escaping from her violent household and ultimately prospering, was also a call to action by organizers of the event to the federal government to launch a public inquiring into the over 580 missing Aboriginal women and children across Canada.

“The reality is there are still too many Canadians who do not recognize or understand thatCanadais facing a human rights crisis,” said Trish Patrick of Sisters in Spirit.

Patrick said a public inquiry, which all NDP politicians who attended the event endorsed, would highlight the tragedy of the Aboriginal community.

The Conservatives have rebuff calls from the public and other premiers for an inquiry, saying existing laws are adequate to deal with the issue. Canadian data reveals that Aboriginal women are three times as likely as other Canadian women to be victims of violence.

Christopherson said questions to the federal Conservatives have been met with indifference.

“We need to push for that public inquiry,” said Christopherson. “It’s unbelievable.”

 

 

 

 

Hamiltonians remember Montreal Massacre

News Dec 06, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

 By Kevin Werner, News Staff

 After 25 years when a gunman shot down 14 women at the Ecole Polytechnique in Montreal during his 20-minute carnage, women are still subjected to fear, assault and intimidation, say politicians.

“Not enough has changed,” said Ontario NDP leader Andrea Horwath, during a ceremony Dec. 6 at the Native Women’s Centre on the Mountain to remember the slain women in Montreal, and the hundreds of Ontario women and girls that have died over the last few years.

Hamiltonwas one of a number of Canadian cities that held vigils for the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women. The event was enshrined after Parliament voted on a motion by Dawn Black, NDP MP in 1991. Hamilton City Hall was bathed in red by the YWCA  to symbolize a call for the end of violence against women.

Horwath told the 80 people who turned out for the two-hour event  that most women are trapped in violent relationships and have no where to turn. She said there is not enough shelters, limited affordable housing, and they are living in poverty working dead-end jobs making their escape from a violent relationship difficult.

And women face the threat of violence not only at home, but when they attend school and work, she said. Horwath said when the tragedy in Montreal occurred she compared her life and feminist beliefs to those women who were killed.

“Women are still experiencing sexual violence today, tomorrow and the day after that,” she said.

“It’s 25 years. It’s time we commit to real change. It’s time to realize if you don’t make that commitment our sisters will continue to be hurt and murdered,” said Horwath.

Chris Charlton, Hamilton Mountain NDP MP was equally frustrated at the limited effort that has been made since Marc Lepine gun down those women, and then killed himself after ranting that feminists had spoiled his life.

“We made damn little progress to women and girls to walk safely on our streets, live securely in their homes and participate fully as equals in our society,” said Charlton. “I want all of us to rise up in anger to finally re-commit, enough is enough. Let’s stop violence against women.”

HamiltonPolice Det.-Sgt. Dave Hennick reinforced the view that women continue to bear the brunt of violence at the hands of men. This year police have responded to over 5,800 incidents of domestic violence, or about 17 calls each day, he said. There have also been over 400 sexual assaults this year that have been investigated by the police. He said 1,100 individuals have been charged.

“(The numbers) continue to rise,” he said.

Hamilton Centre NDP MP David Christopherson says women will continue to be hurt and murdered if men don’t take responsibility for their actions. He said men have to get the message to refrain from making  jokes that are not funny, and to speak up against violence against women.

“We can not eliminate violence in our society against women until every man gets the message,” he said.

The event, which included lighting a candle for the victims of the Montreal massacre, singing, artwork and a woman talking about escaping from her violent household and ultimately prospering, was also a call to action by organizers of the event to the federal government to launch a public inquiring into the over 580 missing Aboriginal women and children across Canada.

“The reality is there are still too many Canadians who do not recognize or understand thatCanadais facing a human rights crisis,” said Trish Patrick of Sisters in Spirit.

Patrick said a public inquiry, which all NDP politicians who attended the event endorsed, would highlight the tragedy of the Aboriginal community.

The Conservatives have rebuff calls from the public and other premiers for an inquiry, saying existing laws are adequate to deal with the issue. Canadian data reveals that Aboriginal women are three times as likely as other Canadian women to be victims of violence.

Christopherson said questions to the federal Conservatives have been met with indifference.

“We need to push for that public inquiry,” said Christopherson. “It’s unbelievable.”

 

 

 

 

Hamiltonians remember Montreal Massacre

News Dec 06, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

 By Kevin Werner, News Staff

 After 25 years when a gunman shot down 14 women at the Ecole Polytechnique in Montreal during his 20-minute carnage, women are still subjected to fear, assault and intimidation, say politicians.

“Not enough has changed,” said Ontario NDP leader Andrea Horwath, during a ceremony Dec. 6 at the Native Women’s Centre on the Mountain to remember the slain women in Montreal, and the hundreds of Ontario women and girls that have died over the last few years.

Hamiltonwas one of a number of Canadian cities that held vigils for the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women. The event was enshrined after Parliament voted on a motion by Dawn Black, NDP MP in 1991. Hamilton City Hall was bathed in red by the YWCA  to symbolize a call for the end of violence against women.

Horwath told the 80 people who turned out for the two-hour event  that most women are trapped in violent relationships and have no where to turn. She said there is not enough shelters, limited affordable housing, and they are living in poverty working dead-end jobs making their escape from a violent relationship difficult.

And women face the threat of violence not only at home, but when they attend school and work, she said. Horwath said when the tragedy in Montreal occurred she compared her life and feminist beliefs to those women who were killed.

“Women are still experiencing sexual violence today, tomorrow and the day after that,” she said.

“It’s 25 years. It’s time we commit to real change. It’s time to realize if you don’t make that commitment our sisters will continue to be hurt and murdered,” said Horwath.

Chris Charlton, Hamilton Mountain NDP MP was equally frustrated at the limited effort that has been made since Marc Lepine gun down those women, and then killed himself after ranting that feminists had spoiled his life.

“We made damn little progress to women and girls to walk safely on our streets, live securely in their homes and participate fully as equals in our society,” said Charlton. “I want all of us to rise up in anger to finally re-commit, enough is enough. Let’s stop violence against women.”

HamiltonPolice Det.-Sgt. Dave Hennick reinforced the view that women continue to bear the brunt of violence at the hands of men. This year police have responded to over 5,800 incidents of domestic violence, or about 17 calls each day, he said. There have also been over 400 sexual assaults this year that have been investigated by the police. He said 1,100 individuals have been charged.

“(The numbers) continue to rise,” he said.

Hamilton Centre NDP MP David Christopherson says women will continue to be hurt and murdered if men don’t take responsibility for their actions. He said men have to get the message to refrain from making  jokes that are not funny, and to speak up against violence against women.

“We can not eliminate violence in our society against women until every man gets the message,” he said.

The event, which included lighting a candle for the victims of the Montreal massacre, singing, artwork and a woman talking about escaping from her violent household and ultimately prospering, was also a call to action by organizers of the event to the federal government to launch a public inquiring into the over 580 missing Aboriginal women and children across Canada.

“The reality is there are still too many Canadians who do not recognize or understand thatCanadais facing a human rights crisis,” said Trish Patrick of Sisters in Spirit.

Patrick said a public inquiry, which all NDP politicians who attended the event endorsed, would highlight the tragedy of the Aboriginal community.

The Conservatives have rebuff calls from the public and other premiers for an inquiry, saying existing laws are adequate to deal with the issue. Canadian data reveals that Aboriginal women are three times as likely as other Canadian women to be victims of violence.

Christopherson said questions to the federal Conservatives have been met with indifference.

“We need to push for that public inquiry,” said Christopherson. “It’s unbelievable.”