Hamilton mayor Fred Eisenberger talks about a 'new era of collaboration'

News Dec 03, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

 By Kevin Werner, News Staff

Newly installed Mayor of Hamilton Fred Eisenberger promises he will listen to the public and engage its citizenry in council’s decision-making process in response to angry residents who feel they have been left without a voice.

“We are entering a new era of collaboration,” said Eisenberger in his inauguration speech Wednesday in a packed council chamber at city hall.

He said the public revealed during the recently concluded municipal election campaign they are frustrated at the insular process councillors make decisions without involving the public. Not only that, said Eisenberger, but he assured the public that any decisions made will be conducted under an “equity lens” where all cultures and genders are considered.

“We will do all we can to engage the public,” said Eisenberger. “We will reach across cultures and viewpoints to find shared views.”

Eisenberger said residents have given the new council, with its four new ward representatives a mandate to “work together as a team.”

He said the public wants council to build a strong economy, provide maximum value to taxpayers and be transparent.

“Our focus is to work together, to move forward (and) to create an environment to prosper,” he said.

Eisenberger also promised to listen to the public and other councillors, a character trait he said during the campaign that was one failing during his last mayoral term from 2006 to 2010.

“I want to work with all of you,” he said. “I want to listen to your ideas.”

He praised the new councillors – Aidan Johnson, Ward 1, Matthew Green, Ward 3, Doug Conley, Ward 9, and Dundas councillor Arlene VanderBeek – for “infusing new blood, new ideas and new energy” around the council table.

The councillors replaced Brian McHattie, former mayor Bob Morrow, Brad Clark and Russ Powers.

“We can learn from one another, try new things, display courage to build a better Hamilton,” said Eisenberger.

The former Ward 5 alderman for the old city of Hamilton, Eisenberger said he has loved the city since he arrived when he was eight years old. That sentiment hasn’t changed, he said, as he took photos of the council chambers, filled with family members, friends, and politicians, then tweeted them out.

“We are gathered here for an important journey for our people,” he said. “Hamilton is a changing city.”

The last time Eisenberger accepted the oath of office in 2006 the ceremony was conducted at the Hamilton Convention Centre. This time about 300 people attended the event.

Attending the event were former mayors Bob Wade, Larry Di Ianni, and the longest-serving mayor for the former city of Morrow, who also served in 2014 as the replacement for Ward 3 councillor Bernie Morelli, who passed away last January. Also in the chambers were Liberal cabinet minister Ted McMeekin, Hamilton Mountain NDP MPP Monique Taylor, Hamilton Police Chief Glenn DeCaire, former Hamilton-Wentworth Regional Chair Terry Cooke, former Liberal MPP Shirley Collins, former Ward 9 councillor Brad Clark and former Hamilton aldermen Mary Kiss and Don Ross, who also ran for mayor this year, but dropped out.

Absent from the proceedings was former mayor Bob Bratina, who is a federal Liberal candidate in the riding of Hamilton East-Stoney Creek.

Providing the oath of office to the mayor and councillors was former Progressive Conservative MPP Anthony Skarica, who is now a justice of the Ontario Superior Court.

The inaugural meeting took about 55 minutes to complete. The only business politicians voted was memberships to committees, subcommittees, boards and agencies. Afterwards, the public was invited to enjoy some refreshments on the second floor of city hall.

Hamilton mayor Fred Eisenberger talks about a 'new era of collaboration'

News Dec 03, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

 By Kevin Werner, News Staff

Newly installed Mayor of Hamilton Fred Eisenberger promises he will listen to the public and engage its citizenry in council’s decision-making process in response to angry residents who feel they have been left without a voice.

“We are entering a new era of collaboration,” said Eisenberger in his inauguration speech Wednesday in a packed council chamber at city hall.

He said the public revealed during the recently concluded municipal election campaign they are frustrated at the insular process councillors make decisions without involving the public. Not only that, said Eisenberger, but he assured the public that any decisions made will be conducted under an “equity lens” where all cultures and genders are considered.

“We will do all we can to engage the public,” said Eisenberger. “We will reach across cultures and viewpoints to find shared views.”

Eisenberger said residents have given the new council, with its four new ward representatives a mandate to “work together as a team.”

He said the public wants council to build a strong economy, provide maximum value to taxpayers and be transparent.

“Our focus is to work together, to move forward (and) to create an environment to prosper,” he said.

Eisenberger also promised to listen to the public and other councillors, a character trait he said during the campaign that was one failing during his last mayoral term from 2006 to 2010.

“I want to work with all of you,” he said. “I want to listen to your ideas.”

He praised the new councillors – Aidan Johnson, Ward 1, Matthew Green, Ward 3, Doug Conley, Ward 9, and Dundas councillor Arlene VanderBeek – for “infusing new blood, new ideas and new energy” around the council table.

The councillors replaced Brian McHattie, former mayor Bob Morrow, Brad Clark and Russ Powers.

“We can learn from one another, try new things, display courage to build a better Hamilton,” said Eisenberger.

The former Ward 5 alderman for the old city of Hamilton, Eisenberger said he has loved the city since he arrived when he was eight years old. That sentiment hasn’t changed, he said, as he took photos of the council chambers, filled with family members, friends, and politicians, then tweeted them out.

“We are gathered here for an important journey for our people,” he said. “Hamilton is a changing city.”

The last time Eisenberger accepted the oath of office in 2006 the ceremony was conducted at the Hamilton Convention Centre. This time about 300 people attended the event.

Attending the event were former mayors Bob Wade, Larry Di Ianni, and the longest-serving mayor for the former city of Morrow, who also served in 2014 as the replacement for Ward 3 councillor Bernie Morelli, who passed away last January. Also in the chambers were Liberal cabinet minister Ted McMeekin, Hamilton Mountain NDP MPP Monique Taylor, Hamilton Police Chief Glenn DeCaire, former Hamilton-Wentworth Regional Chair Terry Cooke, former Liberal MPP Shirley Collins, former Ward 9 councillor Brad Clark and former Hamilton aldermen Mary Kiss and Don Ross, who also ran for mayor this year, but dropped out.

Absent from the proceedings was former mayor Bob Bratina, who is a federal Liberal candidate in the riding of Hamilton East-Stoney Creek.

Providing the oath of office to the mayor and councillors was former Progressive Conservative MPP Anthony Skarica, who is now a justice of the Ontario Superior Court.

The inaugural meeting took about 55 minutes to complete. The only business politicians voted was memberships to committees, subcommittees, boards and agencies. Afterwards, the public was invited to enjoy some refreshments on the second floor of city hall.

Hamilton mayor Fred Eisenberger talks about a 'new era of collaboration'

News Dec 03, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

 By Kevin Werner, News Staff

Newly installed Mayor of Hamilton Fred Eisenberger promises he will listen to the public and engage its citizenry in council’s decision-making process in response to angry residents who feel they have been left without a voice.

“We are entering a new era of collaboration,” said Eisenberger in his inauguration speech Wednesday in a packed council chamber at city hall.

He said the public revealed during the recently concluded municipal election campaign they are frustrated at the insular process councillors make decisions without involving the public. Not only that, said Eisenberger, but he assured the public that any decisions made will be conducted under an “equity lens” where all cultures and genders are considered.

“We will do all we can to engage the public,” said Eisenberger. “We will reach across cultures and viewpoints to find shared views.”

Eisenberger said residents have given the new council, with its four new ward representatives a mandate to “work together as a team.”

He said the public wants council to build a strong economy, provide maximum value to taxpayers and be transparent.

“Our focus is to work together, to move forward (and) to create an environment to prosper,” he said.

Eisenberger also promised to listen to the public and other councillors, a character trait he said during the campaign that was one failing during his last mayoral term from 2006 to 2010.

“I want to work with all of you,” he said. “I want to listen to your ideas.”

He praised the new councillors – Aidan Johnson, Ward 1, Matthew Green, Ward 3, Doug Conley, Ward 9, and Dundas councillor Arlene VanderBeek – for “infusing new blood, new ideas and new energy” around the council table.

The councillors replaced Brian McHattie, former mayor Bob Morrow, Brad Clark and Russ Powers.

“We can learn from one another, try new things, display courage to build a better Hamilton,” said Eisenberger.

The former Ward 5 alderman for the old city of Hamilton, Eisenberger said he has loved the city since he arrived when he was eight years old. That sentiment hasn’t changed, he said, as he took photos of the council chambers, filled with family members, friends, and politicians, then tweeted them out.

“We are gathered here for an important journey for our people,” he said. “Hamilton is a changing city.”

The last time Eisenberger accepted the oath of office in 2006 the ceremony was conducted at the Hamilton Convention Centre. This time about 300 people attended the event.

Attending the event were former mayors Bob Wade, Larry Di Ianni, and the longest-serving mayor for the former city of Morrow, who also served in 2014 as the replacement for Ward 3 councillor Bernie Morelli, who passed away last January. Also in the chambers were Liberal cabinet minister Ted McMeekin, Hamilton Mountain NDP MPP Monique Taylor, Hamilton Police Chief Glenn DeCaire, former Hamilton-Wentworth Regional Chair Terry Cooke, former Liberal MPP Shirley Collins, former Ward 9 councillor Brad Clark and former Hamilton aldermen Mary Kiss and Don Ross, who also ran for mayor this year, but dropped out.

Absent from the proceedings was former mayor Bob Bratina, who is a federal Liberal candidate in the riding of Hamilton East-Stoney Creek.

Providing the oath of office to the mayor and councillors was former Progressive Conservative MPP Anthony Skarica, who is now a justice of the Ontario Superior Court.

The inaugural meeting took about 55 minutes to complete. The only business politicians voted was memberships to committees, subcommittees, boards and agencies. Afterwards, the public was invited to enjoy some refreshments on the second floor of city hall.