Return to sender

News Nov 25, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

By Gord Bowes, News staff

Canada Post has informed some homeowners where they plan to put super mailboxes — and there’s a feeling complaints about safety and other concerns are falling on deaf ears.

“They’re not listening,” said Joshua Hogan, whose corner lot in the Birdland neighbourhood has been chosen for a communal box.

“They said they’re following the national guidelines and that’s it.”

Officials should be looking at each case individually, Hogan said, suggesting a box at the Shoppers plaza at Upper Wellington and Mohawk area would be an ideal spot for his neighbourhood.

“It would be a much better fit,” said Hogan.

He said he’s planning to gather his neighbours’ signatures on a petition to have the box stopped.

Canada Post started knocking on doors of affected homeowners last week to inform them about its choices for super mailbox sites. About 36,500 homes on the Mountain and upper Stoney Creek will have to walk to get their mail starting in the spring as part of Canada Post’s five-year phaseout of home delivery.

Leah Lolua’s corner lot fronts on Hester though she has a Deschene address. She said Canada Post doesn’t seem interested in changing its proposed box site.

“They want to put the box three metres from my front door,” she said, adding she wonders why there would be any consideration of putting a box on busy Hester Street.

She said she suggested it be placed around the corner where another home has a long wooden fence along the side yard, but the officials who talked to her didn’t seem interested in her appeal.

Cathie Weadick, who lives near Pauline Johnson school, was informed last week there would be a box on the property next to hers. She said the location is on a busy street with a curve near the proposed site.

“It’s an accident waiting to happen,” she said.

Weadick said after talking to a supervisor it seemed Canada Post has already predetermined where it wants to place the boxes and was unlikely to budge.

Central Mountain councillor Scott Duvall, whose office fielded several complaints last week, said Canada Post seems to be imposing its will on residents.

“It’s getting people very frustrated and upset,” he said.

“They haven’t consulted with anyone; it’s a dictatorship.”

Canada Post spokesman John Caines said that’s not the case.

“The fact is, it’s a process and it takes time,” he said.

It started in the summer with survey packages asking residents how far they would be willing to walk to get their mail and where the boxes should be located.

“Once we make a determination of where we think (a box) would be best suited, in terms of the location, then we go to the people who are more closely affected by the site and go talk to them and see if they have any issues and go from there,” said Caines.

“It’s a long process and nothing is etched in stone until we are satisfied the customers have had all their say.”

Caines said in Quebec earlier this year Canada Post moved about half of the locations that were proposed based on feedback from customers.

Return to sender

News Nov 25, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

By Gord Bowes, News staff

Canada Post has informed some homeowners where they plan to put super mailboxes — and there’s a feeling complaints about safety and other concerns are falling on deaf ears.

“They’re not listening,” said Joshua Hogan, whose corner lot in the Birdland neighbourhood has been chosen for a communal box.

“They said they’re following the national guidelines and that’s it.”

Officials should be looking at each case individually, Hogan said, suggesting a box at the Shoppers plaza at Upper Wellington and Mohawk area would be an ideal spot for his neighbourhood.

“It would be a much better fit,” said Hogan.

He said he’s planning to gather his neighbours’ signatures on a petition to have the box stopped.

Canada Post started knocking on doors of affected homeowners last week to inform them about its choices for super mailbox sites. About 36,500 homes on the Mountain and upper Stoney Creek will have to walk to get their mail starting in the spring as part of Canada Post’s five-year phaseout of home delivery.

Leah Lolua’s corner lot fronts on Hester though she has a Deschene address. She said Canada Post doesn’t seem interested in changing its proposed box site.

“They want to put the box three metres from my front door,” she said, adding she wonders why there would be any consideration of putting a box on busy Hester Street.

She said she suggested it be placed around the corner where another home has a long wooden fence along the side yard, but the officials who talked to her didn’t seem interested in her appeal.

Cathie Weadick, who lives near Pauline Johnson school, was informed last week there would be a box on the property next to hers. She said the location is on a busy street with a curve near the proposed site.

“It’s an accident waiting to happen,” she said.

Weadick said after talking to a supervisor it seemed Canada Post has already predetermined where it wants to place the boxes and was unlikely to budge.

Central Mountain councillor Scott Duvall, whose office fielded several complaints last week, said Canada Post seems to be imposing its will on residents.

“It’s getting people very frustrated and upset,” he said.

“They haven’t consulted with anyone; it’s a dictatorship.”

Canada Post spokesman John Caines said that’s not the case.

“The fact is, it’s a process and it takes time,” he said.

It started in the summer with survey packages asking residents how far they would be willing to walk to get their mail and where the boxes should be located.

“Once we make a determination of where we think (a box) would be best suited, in terms of the location, then we go to the people who are more closely affected by the site and go talk to them and see if they have any issues and go from there,” said Caines.

“It’s a long process and nothing is etched in stone until we are satisfied the customers have had all their say.”

Caines said in Quebec earlier this year Canada Post moved about half of the locations that were proposed based on feedback from customers.

Return to sender

News Nov 25, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

By Gord Bowes, News staff

Canada Post has informed some homeowners where they plan to put super mailboxes — and there’s a feeling complaints about safety and other concerns are falling on deaf ears.

“They’re not listening,” said Joshua Hogan, whose corner lot in the Birdland neighbourhood has been chosen for a communal box.

“They said they’re following the national guidelines and that’s it.”

Officials should be looking at each case individually, Hogan said, suggesting a box at the Shoppers plaza at Upper Wellington and Mohawk area would be an ideal spot for his neighbourhood.

“It would be a much better fit,” said Hogan.

He said he’s planning to gather his neighbours’ signatures on a petition to have the box stopped.

Canada Post started knocking on doors of affected homeowners last week to inform them about its choices for super mailbox sites. About 36,500 homes on the Mountain and upper Stoney Creek will have to walk to get their mail starting in the spring as part of Canada Post’s five-year phaseout of home delivery.

Leah Lolua’s corner lot fronts on Hester though she has a Deschene address. She said Canada Post doesn’t seem interested in changing its proposed box site.

“They want to put the box three metres from my front door,” she said, adding she wonders why there would be any consideration of putting a box on busy Hester Street.

She said she suggested it be placed around the corner where another home has a long wooden fence along the side yard, but the officials who talked to her didn’t seem interested in her appeal.

Cathie Weadick, who lives near Pauline Johnson school, was informed last week there would be a box on the property next to hers. She said the location is on a busy street with a curve near the proposed site.

“It’s an accident waiting to happen,” she said.

Weadick said after talking to a supervisor it seemed Canada Post has already predetermined where it wants to place the boxes and was unlikely to budge.

Central Mountain councillor Scott Duvall, whose office fielded several complaints last week, said Canada Post seems to be imposing its will on residents.

“It’s getting people very frustrated and upset,” he said.

“They haven’t consulted with anyone; it’s a dictatorship.”

Canada Post spokesman John Caines said that’s not the case.

“The fact is, it’s a process and it takes time,” he said.

It started in the summer with survey packages asking residents how far they would be willing to walk to get their mail and where the boxes should be located.

“Once we make a determination of where we think (a box) would be best suited, in terms of the location, then we go to the people who are more closely affected by the site and go talk to them and see if they have any issues and go from there,” said Caines.

“It’s a long process and nothing is etched in stone until we are satisfied the customers have had all their say.”

Caines said in Quebec earlier this year Canada Post moved about half of the locations that were proposed based on feedback from customers.