Federal Liberals out of blocks first in Hamilton West-Ancaster-Dundas

News Nov 21, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

 By Kevin Werner, News Staff

The Hamilton West-Ancaster-Dundas federal Liberal riding association will be the first party with a candidate next week for what riding officials believe is a winnable new riding for them.

Over 125 people turned out at the Hamilton Air Force Association and Club Nov. 20 to hear six candidates answer seven questions suggested from the association membership during the nearly two-hour event.

Jasper Kujavsky, a crown attorney, told the crowd that he will “focus like a laser” to “effect transformational revitalization of this city’s economy.” His plan is to work with Mayor-elect Fred Eisenberger to protect the waterfront, make sure U.S. Steel fulfills its commitments past the December 2015 deadline, while also protecting pensioners. Kujavsky, who is backed by Eisenberger, will also clean up Randle Reef, and help relocate the CN rail yards on the west harbour to free up the land for economic development.

“This is how you make local concerns connect with a national mandate,” said Kujavsky.

Filomena Tassi, who was the provincial Liberal candidate for the Hamilton Centre riding in 1995, and is a lawyer, said the major issue facing Hamiltonians is the economy, especially how it will benefit youths.

“We need to develop and come up with ideas that are going to create jobs,” said Tassi, who is backed by Hamilton Liberal MPP Ted McMeekin. “The most important thing is to get the economy going.”

Kate Higginbottom, a teacher, who is a PhD candidate, is advocating for the creation of a national ministry of education. She said Canada is the only country in the world that doesn’t have one.

“We produce graduates that don’t produce skills as far as employers are concerned to get jobs,” said Higginbottom, who is supported by former long-time Hamilton Mountain Liberal MP Beth Phinney.

Clarence Seunarine, a Liberal assistant, said the economy, environment and social policy are all intertwined. All three issues have been gutted by Prime Minister Stephen Harper and the Conservatives, he said.

“We’re Liberals, we have a heart,” he said.

Seunarine said when such social policies as child care, housing and poverty fail people, “(they) can be a giant drain on the economy.”

Dr. Abdel Bashir, a critical care doctor, says it’s time Hamilton embraced a new industry that doesn’t rely on steel. He said steel made the community, but in the future, it will be its medical institutions that will provide new jobs.

“We have the best hospitals in the world,” said Bashir, who if elected MP would become the first politician from African in Parliament. “I can see the future in the next 30 years.Hamiltonwill be the centre of medical care.”

He says students are already paying hundreds of thousands of dollars to train at the city’s universities. He would “bring” more wealthy immigrants to the city to attend school and live in the community.

“Immigration can also be an engine for our economy,” he said.

Howard Rabb, a Dundas native, who launched a television service that eventually failed, said Canada needs an improved digital infrastructure that would help to expand the Internet.

“Canada is lagging behind,” he said.

All the candidates agreed that the federal government has a “role” in establishing a national housing strategy with both the provincial and municipal governments. They also agreed that Canada’s role in the world has dramatically changed since the Conservative government assumed power. No longer, they said, does Canada have a respected peacekeeping reputation among other countries.

Rabb said "can you imagine" Prime Minister Justin Trudeau shaking Russian President Vladimir Putin’s hand and saying “get out of Ukraine?

‘Really?” said Rabb.

Seunarine said Canada needs to play a role in NATO, something Harper has ignored.

“Canada can be both Sidney Crosby and Gordie Howe,” he said.

Higginbottom harkened back to former Prime Minister Lester Pearson, who won a Nobel Prize for his peace negotiations during the Suez Canal Crisis.

“We need to be a peacekeeper, a moral compass,” she said.

The Liberal nomination for Hamilton West-Ancaster-Dundas is scheduled for Nov. 25 starting at 6 p.m. at the Royal Canadian Legion in Dundas.

Meanwhile, the NDP riding association is still reviewing its applications for possible candidates, says president Peter Hutton. He hopes to have a better timeline for when the riding will hold its nomination meeting after the executive holds its meeting Dec. 10.

“It’s a new riding, so we are looking for new blood,” said Hutton, who acknowledged former NDP candidates have asked to be considered.

“We have three different ridings with three different cultures,” he said. “We want to use the nomination to bring people together.”

The association is looking at a possible February nomination date, but even that early schedule could bump up against a possible spring federal election if the Conservatives bypass their stated goal of holding onto fixed election dates scheduled for October 2015.

“We are very aware of a possible election,” said Hutton. “We are a little bit distressed about the (date). We are trying to do our due diligence.”

The Conservatives have scheduled Dec. 1 as their nomination date to be held at the Ancaster Fairgrounds starting at 7 p.m. At the moment, a candidate from the mountain Vincent Samuels, a healthcare director remains out front, say party insiders. Also contesting the nomination is former provincial candidate Mark Mullins who ran in 2003 and registered nurse Bert Laranjo.

 

Federal Liberals out of blocks first in Hamilton West-Ancaster-Dundas

News Nov 21, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

 By Kevin Werner, News Staff

The Hamilton West-Ancaster-Dundas federal Liberal riding association will be the first party with a candidate next week for what riding officials believe is a winnable new riding for them.

Over 125 people turned out at the Hamilton Air Force Association and Club Nov. 20 to hear six candidates answer seven questions suggested from the association membership during the nearly two-hour event.

Jasper Kujavsky, a crown attorney, told the crowd that he will “focus like a laser” to “effect transformational revitalization of this city’s economy.” His plan is to work with Mayor-elect Fred Eisenberger to protect the waterfront, make sure U.S. Steel fulfills its commitments past the December 2015 deadline, while also protecting pensioners. Kujavsky, who is backed by Eisenberger, will also clean up Randle Reef, and help relocate the CN rail yards on the west harbour to free up the land for economic development.

“This is how you make local concerns connect with a national mandate,” said Kujavsky.

Filomena Tassi, who was the provincial Liberal candidate for the Hamilton Centre riding in 1995, and is a lawyer, said the major issue facing Hamiltonians is the economy, especially how it will benefit youths.

“We need to develop and come up with ideas that are going to create jobs,” said Tassi, who is backed by Hamilton Liberal MPP Ted McMeekin. “The most important thing is to get the economy going.”

Kate Higginbottom, a teacher, who is a PhD candidate, is advocating for the creation of a national ministry of education. She said Canada is the only country in the world that doesn’t have one.

“We produce graduates that don’t produce skills as far as employers are concerned to get jobs,” said Higginbottom, who is supported by former long-time Hamilton Mountain Liberal MP Beth Phinney.

Clarence Seunarine, a Liberal assistant, said the economy, environment and social policy are all intertwined. All three issues have been gutted by Prime Minister Stephen Harper and the Conservatives, he said.

“We’re Liberals, we have a heart,” he said.

Seunarine said when such social policies as child care, housing and poverty fail people, “(they) can be a giant drain on the economy.”

Dr. Abdel Bashir, a critical care doctor, says it’s time Hamilton embraced a new industry that doesn’t rely on steel. He said steel made the community, but in the future, it will be its medical institutions that will provide new jobs.

“We have the best hospitals in the world,” said Bashir, who if elected MP would become the first politician from African in Parliament. “I can see the future in the next 30 years.Hamiltonwill be the centre of medical care.”

He says students are already paying hundreds of thousands of dollars to train at the city’s universities. He would “bring” more wealthy immigrants to the city to attend school and live in the community.

“Immigration can also be an engine for our economy,” he said.

Howard Rabb, a Dundas native, who launched a television service that eventually failed, said Canada needs an improved digital infrastructure that would help to expand the Internet.

“Canada is lagging behind,” he said.

All the candidates agreed that the federal government has a “role” in establishing a national housing strategy with both the provincial and municipal governments. They also agreed that Canada’s role in the world has dramatically changed since the Conservative government assumed power. No longer, they said, does Canada have a respected peacekeeping reputation among other countries.

Rabb said "can you imagine" Prime Minister Justin Trudeau shaking Russian President Vladimir Putin’s hand and saying “get out of Ukraine?

‘Really?” said Rabb.

Seunarine said Canada needs to play a role in NATO, something Harper has ignored.

“Canada can be both Sidney Crosby and Gordie Howe,” he said.

Higginbottom harkened back to former Prime Minister Lester Pearson, who won a Nobel Prize for his peace negotiations during the Suez Canal Crisis.

“We need to be a peacekeeper, a moral compass,” she said.

The Liberal nomination for Hamilton West-Ancaster-Dundas is scheduled for Nov. 25 starting at 6 p.m. at the Royal Canadian Legion in Dundas.

Meanwhile, the NDP riding association is still reviewing its applications for possible candidates, says president Peter Hutton. He hopes to have a better timeline for when the riding will hold its nomination meeting after the executive holds its meeting Dec. 10.

“It’s a new riding, so we are looking for new blood,” said Hutton, who acknowledged former NDP candidates have asked to be considered.

“We have three different ridings with three different cultures,” he said. “We want to use the nomination to bring people together.”

The association is looking at a possible February nomination date, but even that early schedule could bump up against a possible spring federal election if the Conservatives bypass their stated goal of holding onto fixed election dates scheduled for October 2015.

“We are very aware of a possible election,” said Hutton. “We are a little bit distressed about the (date). We are trying to do our due diligence.”

The Conservatives have scheduled Dec. 1 as their nomination date to be held at the Ancaster Fairgrounds starting at 7 p.m. At the moment, a candidate from the mountain Vincent Samuels, a healthcare director remains out front, say party insiders. Also contesting the nomination is former provincial candidate Mark Mullins who ran in 2003 and registered nurse Bert Laranjo.

 

Federal Liberals out of blocks first in Hamilton West-Ancaster-Dundas

News Nov 21, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

 By Kevin Werner, News Staff

The Hamilton West-Ancaster-Dundas federal Liberal riding association will be the first party with a candidate next week for what riding officials believe is a winnable new riding for them.

Over 125 people turned out at the Hamilton Air Force Association and Club Nov. 20 to hear six candidates answer seven questions suggested from the association membership during the nearly two-hour event.

Jasper Kujavsky, a crown attorney, told the crowd that he will “focus like a laser” to “effect transformational revitalization of this city’s economy.” His plan is to work with Mayor-elect Fred Eisenberger to protect the waterfront, make sure U.S. Steel fulfills its commitments past the December 2015 deadline, while also protecting pensioners. Kujavsky, who is backed by Eisenberger, will also clean up Randle Reef, and help relocate the CN rail yards on the west harbour to free up the land for economic development.

“This is how you make local concerns connect with a national mandate,” said Kujavsky.

Filomena Tassi, who was the provincial Liberal candidate for the Hamilton Centre riding in 1995, and is a lawyer, said the major issue facing Hamiltonians is the economy, especially how it will benefit youths.

“We need to develop and come up with ideas that are going to create jobs,” said Tassi, who is backed by Hamilton Liberal MPP Ted McMeekin. “The most important thing is to get the economy going.”

Kate Higginbottom, a teacher, who is a PhD candidate, is advocating for the creation of a national ministry of education. She said Canada is the only country in the world that doesn’t have one.

“We produce graduates that don’t produce skills as far as employers are concerned to get jobs,” said Higginbottom, who is supported by former long-time Hamilton Mountain Liberal MP Beth Phinney.

Clarence Seunarine, a Liberal assistant, said the economy, environment and social policy are all intertwined. All three issues have been gutted by Prime Minister Stephen Harper and the Conservatives, he said.

“We’re Liberals, we have a heart,” he said.

Seunarine said when such social policies as child care, housing and poverty fail people, “(they) can be a giant drain on the economy.”

Dr. Abdel Bashir, a critical care doctor, says it’s time Hamilton embraced a new industry that doesn’t rely on steel. He said steel made the community, but in the future, it will be its medical institutions that will provide new jobs.

“We have the best hospitals in the world,” said Bashir, who if elected MP would become the first politician from African in Parliament. “I can see the future in the next 30 years.Hamiltonwill be the centre of medical care.”

He says students are already paying hundreds of thousands of dollars to train at the city’s universities. He would “bring” more wealthy immigrants to the city to attend school and live in the community.

“Immigration can also be an engine for our economy,” he said.

Howard Rabb, a Dundas native, who launched a television service that eventually failed, said Canada needs an improved digital infrastructure that would help to expand the Internet.

“Canada is lagging behind,” he said.

All the candidates agreed that the federal government has a “role” in establishing a national housing strategy with both the provincial and municipal governments. They also agreed that Canada’s role in the world has dramatically changed since the Conservative government assumed power. No longer, they said, does Canada have a respected peacekeeping reputation among other countries.

Rabb said "can you imagine" Prime Minister Justin Trudeau shaking Russian President Vladimir Putin’s hand and saying “get out of Ukraine?

‘Really?” said Rabb.

Seunarine said Canada needs to play a role in NATO, something Harper has ignored.

“Canada can be both Sidney Crosby and Gordie Howe,” he said.

Higginbottom harkened back to former Prime Minister Lester Pearson, who won a Nobel Prize for his peace negotiations during the Suez Canal Crisis.

“We need to be a peacekeeper, a moral compass,” she said.

The Liberal nomination for Hamilton West-Ancaster-Dundas is scheduled for Nov. 25 starting at 6 p.m. at the Royal Canadian Legion in Dundas.

Meanwhile, the NDP riding association is still reviewing its applications for possible candidates, says president Peter Hutton. He hopes to have a better timeline for when the riding will hold its nomination meeting after the executive holds its meeting Dec. 10.

“It’s a new riding, so we are looking for new blood,” said Hutton, who acknowledged former NDP candidates have asked to be considered.

“We have three different ridings with three different cultures,” he said. “We want to use the nomination to bring people together.”

The association is looking at a possible February nomination date, but even that early schedule could bump up against a possible spring federal election if the Conservatives bypass their stated goal of holding onto fixed election dates scheduled for October 2015.

“We are very aware of a possible election,” said Hutton. “We are a little bit distressed about the (date). We are trying to do our due diligence.”

The Conservatives have scheduled Dec. 1 as their nomination date to be held at the Ancaster Fairgrounds starting at 7 p.m. At the moment, a candidate from the mountain Vincent Samuels, a healthcare director remains out front, say party insiders. Also contesting the nomination is former provincial candidate Mark Mullins who ran in 2003 and registered nurse Bert Laranjo.