Henderson high school site plans keep eye on horizon

News Nov 19, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

By Richard Leitner, News Staff

Finding a parking spot at the future Nora Frances Henderson Secondary School on the south Mountain shouldn’t be a problem.

Plans submitted to the city by Hamilton’s public school board set aside room for 405 spaces, or nearly double the 207 required, for the three-storey school, to be built near the southwest corner of Upper Sherman Avenue and Rymal Road.

Senior facilities manager Daniel Del Bianco said the plans include the higher number of spaces in case the 167,000-square-foot school needs to be expanded to accommodate housing growth in the area.

“It’s so we don’t have to go through this process again when the addition happens,” he said. “It doesn’t mean they’ll all be built, but at least the area will be identified.”

Submitted in support of the board’s application to change the site’s existing residential zoning, the plans call for the school to face Upper Sherman, which is being extended south of Rymal.

An artificial-turf playing field with a track, bleachers and lighting will be at the rear, while room for 390 parking spaces will be along the southern boundary, with another 15 in front for short-term visits.

An artist’s rendering of the proposed Nora Frances Henderson secondary school, looking southwest from what would be the intersection of the Upper Sherman Avenue extension (left) and  the extension of Wagner Drive. The homes in the upper right are located on Turquoise Drive. | McCallum Sather Architects Inc.

 

Even with a potential 90,000-square-foot addition, the site will only need 8.5 of the 12 hectares the board purchased for the school, allowing the balance to be sold for housing.

Central Mountain councillor Scott Duvall said he’s awaiting a staff report on the plans, but is concerned by the reliance on public transit for students not within walking distance because the two buses that pass near the school only run every half hour.

He said lack of sidewalks in the area is also already a safety concern for students walking to St. Jean de Brebeuf Catholic high school, about a half kilometre to the north.

The city will be upgrading Upper Sherman and Rymal with sidewalks, but they may not be in place by the school’s scheduled September 2016 opening, he said.

“With development that I see, we don’t urbanize stuff and just plant things in the middle of a property and worry about urbanization after the fact,” Duvall said.

“It’s great for the community,” he said of the school, “but it just has so many questions.”

Del Bianco said while the vast majority of students will be able to walk to the school, the board won’t make them do so if it’s unsafe.

Those beyond walking distance will be provided transportation by either city or yellow school bus, he said.

“Whatever work is required to get site-plan approval, the board will undertake,” he said.

Henderson high school site plans keep eye on horizon

News Nov 19, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

By Richard Leitner, News Staff

Finding a parking spot at the future Nora Frances Henderson Secondary School on the south Mountain shouldn’t be a problem.

Plans submitted to the city by Hamilton’s public school board set aside room for 405 spaces, or nearly double the 207 required, for the three-storey school, to be built near the southwest corner of Upper Sherman Avenue and Rymal Road.

Senior facilities manager Daniel Del Bianco said the plans include the higher number of spaces in case the 167,000-square-foot school needs to be expanded to accommodate housing growth in the area.

“It’s so we don’t have to go through this process again when the addition happens,” he said. “It doesn’t mean they’ll all be built, but at least the area will be identified.”

Submitted in support of the board’s application to change the site’s existing residential zoning, the plans call for the school to face Upper Sherman, which is being extended south of Rymal.

An artificial-turf playing field with a track, bleachers and lighting will be at the rear, while room for 390 parking spaces will be along the southern boundary, with another 15 in front for short-term visits.

An artist’s rendering of the proposed Nora Frances Henderson secondary school, looking southwest from what would be the intersection of the Upper Sherman Avenue extension (left) and  the extension of Wagner Drive. The homes in the upper right are located on Turquoise Drive. | McCallum Sather Architects Inc.

 

Even with a potential 90,000-square-foot addition, the site will only need 8.5 of the 12 hectares the board purchased for the school, allowing the balance to be sold for housing.

Central Mountain councillor Scott Duvall said he’s awaiting a staff report on the plans, but is concerned by the reliance on public transit for students not within walking distance because the two buses that pass near the school only run every half hour.

He said lack of sidewalks in the area is also already a safety concern for students walking to St. Jean de Brebeuf Catholic high school, about a half kilometre to the north.

The city will be upgrading Upper Sherman and Rymal with sidewalks, but they may not be in place by the school’s scheduled September 2016 opening, he said.

“With development that I see, we don’t urbanize stuff and just plant things in the middle of a property and worry about urbanization after the fact,” Duvall said.

“It’s great for the community,” he said of the school, “but it just has so many questions.”

Del Bianco said while the vast majority of students will be able to walk to the school, the board won’t make them do so if it’s unsafe.

Those beyond walking distance will be provided transportation by either city or yellow school bus, he said.

“Whatever work is required to get site-plan approval, the board will undertake,” he said.

Henderson high school site plans keep eye on horizon

News Nov 19, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

By Richard Leitner, News Staff

Finding a parking spot at the future Nora Frances Henderson Secondary School on the south Mountain shouldn’t be a problem.

Plans submitted to the city by Hamilton’s public school board set aside room for 405 spaces, or nearly double the 207 required, for the three-storey school, to be built near the southwest corner of Upper Sherman Avenue and Rymal Road.

Senior facilities manager Daniel Del Bianco said the plans include the higher number of spaces in case the 167,000-square-foot school needs to be expanded to accommodate housing growth in the area.

“It’s so we don’t have to go through this process again when the addition happens,” he said. “It doesn’t mean they’ll all be built, but at least the area will be identified.”

Submitted in support of the board’s application to change the site’s existing residential zoning, the plans call for the school to face Upper Sherman, which is being extended south of Rymal.

An artificial-turf playing field with a track, bleachers and lighting will be at the rear, while room for 390 parking spaces will be along the southern boundary, with another 15 in front for short-term visits.

An artist’s rendering of the proposed Nora Frances Henderson secondary school, looking southwest from what would be the intersection of the Upper Sherman Avenue extension (left) and  the extension of Wagner Drive. The homes in the upper right are located on Turquoise Drive. | McCallum Sather Architects Inc.

 

Even with a potential 90,000-square-foot addition, the site will only need 8.5 of the 12 hectares the board purchased for the school, allowing the balance to be sold for housing.

Central Mountain councillor Scott Duvall said he’s awaiting a staff report on the plans, but is concerned by the reliance on public transit for students not within walking distance because the two buses that pass near the school only run every half hour.

He said lack of sidewalks in the area is also already a safety concern for students walking to St. Jean de Brebeuf Catholic high school, about a half kilometre to the north.

The city will be upgrading Upper Sherman and Rymal with sidewalks, but they may not be in place by the school’s scheduled September 2016 opening, he said.

“With development that I see, we don’t urbanize stuff and just plant things in the middle of a property and worry about urbanization after the fact,” Duvall said.

“It’s great for the community,” he said of the school, “but it just has so many questions.”

Del Bianco said while the vast majority of students will be able to walk to the school, the board won’t make them do so if it’s unsafe.

Those beyond walking distance will be provided transportation by either city or yellow school bus, he said.

“Whatever work is required to get site-plan approval, the board will undertake,” he said.