Hamilton Mountain MP dealing with after effects of shooting

News Oct 29, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

Charlton recalls tense moments on Parliament Hill

By Mark Newman, News Staff

Like a lot of people who work on Parliament Hill, Hamilton Mountain MP Chris Charlton is dealing with the emotional after effects of last week’s shooting.

“It comes in waves,” said the NDP MP, who hit the floor with the rest of her colleagues in their locked caucus room when the bullets started to fly just before 10 a.m. on Oct 22. “I certainly had a tough time sleeping.”

A bullet remains lodged inside the inner door of the caucus room located on the second floor of the Centre Block, across the hallway from the Conservative caucus room.

Charlton said at first she did not recognize the sound of the gunfire.

“I thought a stack of chairs had fallen over,” said the MP who noted some of her colleagues immediately realized gun shots were being fired and told everyone to get down.

Chairs and tables were stacked in front of the locked door.

Charlton said that since the caucus room has no windows and cell phone access was very poor, they really didn’t know what was going on or who was shooting at whom.

“It was very surreal,” said Charlton, who noted the MPs were getting information via Twitter and emails from concerned family members and friends.

Shortly after the shooting the NDP MPs were split up and taken to a couple of other secured rooms in another building on Parliament Hill where they stayed until about 8 p.m.

After that Charlton said they were taken by city bus with a police escort to a Department of Foreign Affairs building off the Hill where they were they gave statements to police.

She finally got to her Ottawa apartment around 10 p.m.

While she never expected to see a shooting on Parliament Hill, Charlton said she hopes the government will not react in a rash manner to the incident and that the openness the public has come to know on the site will continue.

“The place belongs to Canadians and it has to remain accessible to Canadians,” Charlton said.

Hamilton Mountain MP dealing with after effects of shooting

News Oct 29, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

Charlton recalls tense moments on Parliament Hill

By Mark Newman, News Staff

Like a lot of people who work on Parliament Hill, Hamilton Mountain MP Chris Charlton is dealing with the emotional after effects of last week’s shooting.

“It comes in waves,” said the NDP MP, who hit the floor with the rest of her colleagues in their locked caucus room when the bullets started to fly just before 10 a.m. on Oct 22. “I certainly had a tough time sleeping.”

A bullet remains lodged inside the inner door of the caucus room located on the second floor of the Centre Block, across the hallway from the Conservative caucus room.

Charlton said at first she did not recognize the sound of the gunfire.

“I thought a stack of chairs had fallen over,” said the MP who noted some of her colleagues immediately realized gun shots were being fired and told everyone to get down.

Chairs and tables were stacked in front of the locked door.

Charlton said that since the caucus room has no windows and cell phone access was very poor, they really didn’t know what was going on or who was shooting at whom.

“It was very surreal,” said Charlton, who noted the MPs were getting information via Twitter and emails from concerned family members and friends.

Shortly after the shooting the NDP MPs were split up and taken to a couple of other secured rooms in another building on Parliament Hill where they stayed until about 8 p.m.

After that Charlton said they were taken by city bus with a police escort to a Department of Foreign Affairs building off the Hill where they were they gave statements to police.

She finally got to her Ottawa apartment around 10 p.m.

While she never expected to see a shooting on Parliament Hill, Charlton said she hopes the government will not react in a rash manner to the incident and that the openness the public has come to know on the site will continue.

“The place belongs to Canadians and it has to remain accessible to Canadians,” Charlton said.

Hamilton Mountain MP dealing with after effects of shooting

News Oct 29, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

Charlton recalls tense moments on Parliament Hill

By Mark Newman, News Staff

Like a lot of people who work on Parliament Hill, Hamilton Mountain MP Chris Charlton is dealing with the emotional after effects of last week’s shooting.

“It comes in waves,” said the NDP MP, who hit the floor with the rest of her colleagues in their locked caucus room when the bullets started to fly just before 10 a.m. on Oct 22. “I certainly had a tough time sleeping.”

A bullet remains lodged inside the inner door of the caucus room located on the second floor of the Centre Block, across the hallway from the Conservative caucus room.

Charlton said at first she did not recognize the sound of the gunfire.

“I thought a stack of chairs had fallen over,” said the MP who noted some of her colleagues immediately realized gun shots were being fired and told everyone to get down.

Chairs and tables were stacked in front of the locked door.

Charlton said that since the caucus room has no windows and cell phone access was very poor, they really didn’t know what was going on or who was shooting at whom.

“It was very surreal,” said Charlton, who noted the MPs were getting information via Twitter and emails from concerned family members and friends.

Shortly after the shooting the NDP MPs were split up and taken to a couple of other secured rooms in another building on Parliament Hill where they stayed until about 8 p.m.

After that Charlton said they were taken by city bus with a police escort to a Department of Foreign Affairs building off the Hill where they were they gave statements to police.

She finally got to her Ottawa apartment around 10 p.m.

While she never expected to see a shooting on Parliament Hill, Charlton said she hopes the government will not react in a rash manner to the incident and that the openness the public has come to know on the site will continue.

“The place belongs to Canadians and it has to remain accessible to Canadians,” Charlton said.