Halloween a big food raiser on Hamilton Mountain

News Oct 22, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

Hundreds of students will be out to support food bank

 By Mark Newman, News Staff 

It’s the unofficial kick-off to the Christmas-holiday season food drive at Neighbour to Neighbour Centre.

Hundreds of students from St. Thomas More and Sherwood high schools will be fanning out across the Mountain to collect food for the west Mountain food bank on Halloween night.

Meanwhile, over in Ancaster, about 300 students from Bishop Tonnos Catholic Secondary School will also be out collecting food for Neighbour to Neighbour.

This year marks the 15th anniversary of the Halloween for Hunger campaign at STM.

Jaunna Lewandowski, a 17-year-old Grade 12 student who oversees the H4H student committee, said Halloween for Hunger is one of the first things Grade 9 students learn about and this year they expect as many as 800 students will be taking part.

“It’s something the students want to get involved in,” she said.

Teams of 2-4 More students plus a driver will start heading out around 5:30 p.m. and each team is assigned one of the 285 routes that include 50-100 homes.

Flyers started going out this week to some 22,000 homes in the STM collection area on the central and west Mountain reminding them of the annual food drive.

Last year More students collected more than 75,000 pounds of food and they are hoping to reach 76,000 pounds this year.

At Sherwood, the school’s Social Justice Club is busy signing up students to help with their fourth annual Sherwood Scares Hunger initiative.

Club member Aleks Ljubinkovic, a 16-year-old Grade 12 student, said they expect at least 50 students to be out collecting food on the central-east Mountain and parts of upper Stoney Creek on Halloween night.

Last year they collected 6,000 pounds of food for Neighbour to Neighbour Centre and they hope to match that total again next week.

Food collection boxes have also been set up in the classrooms and there will be a haunted hallway in the Sherwood basement Oct. 31 with an admission fee of $2 or two cans of food.

Ljubinkovic said students will be delivering flyers about their campaign to homes in the area in the coming days.

Club member Kristen Castell said the response from the community has been positive.

“We do have a lot of very receptive people, a lot of very passionate and willing people,” said the 17-year-old Grade 12 student.

Denise Arkell, executive director at Neighbour to Neighbour Centre, said the food gathered by the More and Sherwood students should help keep the shelves of their food bank stocked for a month or so.

She said the food drives are “instrumental to our ability to provide food in the months of November and December to our clients.”

Upwards of 1,200 families use the west Mountain food bank each month.

Halloween a big food raiser on Hamilton Mountain

News Oct 22, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

Hundreds of students will be out to support food bank

 By Mark Newman, News Staff 

It’s the unofficial kick-off to the Christmas-holiday season food drive at Neighbour to Neighbour Centre.

Hundreds of students from St. Thomas More and Sherwood high schools will be fanning out across the Mountain to collect food for the west Mountain food bank on Halloween night.

Meanwhile, over in Ancaster, about 300 students from Bishop Tonnos Catholic Secondary School will also be out collecting food for Neighbour to Neighbour.

This year marks the 15th anniversary of the Halloween for Hunger campaign at STM.

Jaunna Lewandowski, a 17-year-old Grade 12 student who oversees the H4H student committee, said Halloween for Hunger is one of the first things Grade 9 students learn about and this year they expect as many as 800 students will be taking part.

“It’s something the students want to get involved in,” she said.

Teams of 2-4 More students plus a driver will start heading out around 5:30 p.m. and each team is assigned one of the 285 routes that include 50-100 homes.

Flyers started going out this week to some 22,000 homes in the STM collection area on the central and west Mountain reminding them of the annual food drive.

Last year More students collected more than 75,000 pounds of food and they are hoping to reach 76,000 pounds this year.

At Sherwood, the school’s Social Justice Club is busy signing up students to help with their fourth annual Sherwood Scares Hunger initiative.

Club member Aleks Ljubinkovic, a 16-year-old Grade 12 student, said they expect at least 50 students to be out collecting food on the central-east Mountain and parts of upper Stoney Creek on Halloween night.

Last year they collected 6,000 pounds of food for Neighbour to Neighbour Centre and they hope to match that total again next week.

Food collection boxes have also been set up in the classrooms and there will be a haunted hallway in the Sherwood basement Oct. 31 with an admission fee of $2 or two cans of food.

Ljubinkovic said students will be delivering flyers about their campaign to homes in the area in the coming days.

Club member Kristen Castell said the response from the community has been positive.

“We do have a lot of very receptive people, a lot of very passionate and willing people,” said the 17-year-old Grade 12 student.

Denise Arkell, executive director at Neighbour to Neighbour Centre, said the food gathered by the More and Sherwood students should help keep the shelves of their food bank stocked for a month or so.

She said the food drives are “instrumental to our ability to provide food in the months of November and December to our clients.”

Upwards of 1,200 families use the west Mountain food bank each month.

Halloween a big food raiser on Hamilton Mountain

News Oct 22, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

Hundreds of students will be out to support food bank

 By Mark Newman, News Staff 

It’s the unofficial kick-off to the Christmas-holiday season food drive at Neighbour to Neighbour Centre.

Hundreds of students from St. Thomas More and Sherwood high schools will be fanning out across the Mountain to collect food for the west Mountain food bank on Halloween night.

Meanwhile, over in Ancaster, about 300 students from Bishop Tonnos Catholic Secondary School will also be out collecting food for Neighbour to Neighbour.

This year marks the 15th anniversary of the Halloween for Hunger campaign at STM.

Jaunna Lewandowski, a 17-year-old Grade 12 student who oversees the H4H student committee, said Halloween for Hunger is one of the first things Grade 9 students learn about and this year they expect as many as 800 students will be taking part.

“It’s something the students want to get involved in,” she said.

Teams of 2-4 More students plus a driver will start heading out around 5:30 p.m. and each team is assigned one of the 285 routes that include 50-100 homes.

Flyers started going out this week to some 22,000 homes in the STM collection area on the central and west Mountain reminding them of the annual food drive.

Last year More students collected more than 75,000 pounds of food and they are hoping to reach 76,000 pounds this year.

At Sherwood, the school’s Social Justice Club is busy signing up students to help with their fourth annual Sherwood Scares Hunger initiative.

Club member Aleks Ljubinkovic, a 16-year-old Grade 12 student, said they expect at least 50 students to be out collecting food on the central-east Mountain and parts of upper Stoney Creek on Halloween night.

Last year they collected 6,000 pounds of food for Neighbour to Neighbour Centre and they hope to match that total again next week.

Food collection boxes have also been set up in the classrooms and there will be a haunted hallway in the Sherwood basement Oct. 31 with an admission fee of $2 or two cans of food.

Ljubinkovic said students will be delivering flyers about their campaign to homes in the area in the coming days.

Club member Kristen Castell said the response from the community has been positive.

“We do have a lot of very receptive people, a lot of very passionate and willing people,” said the 17-year-old Grade 12 student.

Denise Arkell, executive director at Neighbour to Neighbour Centre, said the food gathered by the More and Sherwood students should help keep the shelves of their food bank stocked for a month or so.

She said the food drives are “instrumental to our ability to provide food in the months of November and December to our clients.”

Upwards of 1,200 families use the west Mountain food bank each month.