McHattie says mayoral race is between him and Eisenberger

News Oct 20, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

 By Kevin Werner, News Staff

Hamilton mayoral candidate Brian McHattie says former mayor Fred Eisenberger “hasn’t earned the right” become the next chief magistrate of the city.

The Ward 1 councillor said after Eisenberger lost in the 2010 municipal election, placing third behind Bob Bratina and Larry Di Ianni, he “disappeared” for the next four years from the community. Instead of getting involved in community issues, such as the casino debate, and the airport lands, Eisenberger became the chief executive officer of the Canadian Urban Institute for about two years.

“I believe strongly you need to earn the right to be mayor,” said McHattie. “(Eisenberger) doesn’t deserve to be mayor.”

McHattie’s thoughts on the mayoral race took place when he released his 40-page campaign platform Oct. 20 that included all his ideas and pronouncements he wants to develop if he wins office Oct. 27.

“You see it in its entirety,” said McHattie, referring to his document. “It’s a whole picture, a whole ecosystem of ideas.”

Those proposals include a $22.5 million sidewalk and local roads fund; affordable housing; his four-part transit plan, which includes building the light-rail transit system; the creation of a Cootes Paradise to Escarpment National Park, and the establishment of a trees and park trust. McHattie acknowledge the 15 proposals have not been costed out except for his sidewalk plan and national park idea.

There are also no specific policies to improve Hamilton’s gender equity and diversity programs, other than McHattie’s willingness to push forward a new anti-racism centre that council deferred prior to the election. The gender equity issue became a prominent issue after a Ward 3 mayors’ debate. A day after the event, Eisenberger proposed a program to improve gender equity within the community.

“I commend Fred for picking up on that,” said McHattie.

About a month ago Eisenberger released his 17-page agenda that focuses on creating jobs, and boosting the economic development of the city.

McHattie says there is a “really clear difference” between Eisenberger’s and his platform, arguing his proposals are “evidence-based.”

He says Eisenberger’s campaign has yet to take off, saying “he hasn’t engaged to any great degree.”

He expected Eisenberger and his noteworthy supporter, former mayor Larry Di Ianni, to come out of the political race guns blazing. McHattie says that didn’t happen.

“I say where are these guys? What are they doing? It’s been a very sleepy campaign for Mr. Eisenberger,” said McHattie.

But the 11-year council veteran says with a week to go in what is turning into an interesting mayoral race, he finds his support is becoming a rising tide that is set to splash down on Oct. 27.

“There is a feeling,” says McHattie, who has about 400 volunteers on his campaign. “This has been building over the last two weeks. And it hasn’t peaked. We have one week to crystallize that.”

McHattie says the voter support moving towards his camp is at the expense of Eisenberger’s, especially onHamiltonMountain.

Meanwhile, Clark released his platform, also on Oct. 20, reiterating ideas that he has presented during the campaign so far, such as his opposition to light-rail transit, and support for what he calls “SmartTransit” that involves expanding the city’s bus system; keeping taxes low and spending even lower; focusing on infrastructure repairs; building more affordable housing; creating a “Team Hamilton” business development plan, and calling for a “New Deal” for Hamilton. Clark, in his document, points out that during Eisenberger’s four-year term from 2006 to 2010, the city’s budget ballooned 42 percent, leading to higher property taxes.

Clark also focuses on his theme that council in the past has concentrated too much on the downtown and has ignored the suburban areas.

But according to McHattie, despite what Clark does during the last week of the campaign, his support has stabilized.

“I really believe it’s between Fred and myself,” said McHattie, who has dismissed polls showing Eisenberger out front of both contenders.

McHattie says he is battling not only Eisenberger and his name recognition, but also Di Ianni, who earlier in the campaign threw his support behind Eisenberger. He believes if Eisenberger wins, Di Ianni will find himself a seat in the mayor’s office as well.

“It’s a package deal,” says McHattie.

McHattie says mayoral race is between him and Eisenberger

News Oct 20, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

 By Kevin Werner, News Staff

Hamilton mayoral candidate Brian McHattie says former mayor Fred Eisenberger “hasn’t earned the right” become the next chief magistrate of the city.

The Ward 1 councillor said after Eisenberger lost in the 2010 municipal election, placing third behind Bob Bratina and Larry Di Ianni, he “disappeared” for the next four years from the community. Instead of getting involved in community issues, such as the casino debate, and the airport lands, Eisenberger became the chief executive officer of the Canadian Urban Institute for about two years.

“I believe strongly you need to earn the right to be mayor,” said McHattie. “(Eisenberger) doesn’t deserve to be mayor.”

McHattie’s thoughts on the mayoral race took place when he released his 40-page campaign platform Oct. 20 that included all his ideas and pronouncements he wants to develop if he wins office Oct. 27.

“You see it in its entirety,” said McHattie, referring to his document. “It’s a whole picture, a whole ecosystem of ideas.”

Those proposals include a $22.5 million sidewalk and local roads fund; affordable housing; his four-part transit plan, which includes building the light-rail transit system; the creation of a Cootes Paradise to Escarpment National Park, and the establishment of a trees and park trust. McHattie acknowledge the 15 proposals have not been costed out except for his sidewalk plan and national park idea.

There are also no specific policies to improve Hamilton’s gender equity and diversity programs, other than McHattie’s willingness to push forward a new anti-racism centre that council deferred prior to the election. The gender equity issue became a prominent issue after a Ward 3 mayors’ debate. A day after the event, Eisenberger proposed a program to improve gender equity within the community.

“I commend Fred for picking up on that,” said McHattie.

About a month ago Eisenberger released his 17-page agenda that focuses on creating jobs, and boosting the economic development of the city.

McHattie says there is a “really clear difference” between Eisenberger’s and his platform, arguing his proposals are “evidence-based.”

He says Eisenberger’s campaign has yet to take off, saying “he hasn’t engaged to any great degree.”

He expected Eisenberger and his noteworthy supporter, former mayor Larry Di Ianni, to come out of the political race guns blazing. McHattie says that didn’t happen.

“I say where are these guys? What are they doing? It’s been a very sleepy campaign for Mr. Eisenberger,” said McHattie.

But the 11-year council veteran says with a week to go in what is turning into an interesting mayoral race, he finds his support is becoming a rising tide that is set to splash down on Oct. 27.

“There is a feeling,” says McHattie, who has about 400 volunteers on his campaign. “This has been building over the last two weeks. And it hasn’t peaked. We have one week to crystallize that.”

McHattie says the voter support moving towards his camp is at the expense of Eisenberger’s, especially onHamiltonMountain.

Meanwhile, Clark released his platform, also on Oct. 20, reiterating ideas that he has presented during the campaign so far, such as his opposition to light-rail transit, and support for what he calls “SmartTransit” that involves expanding the city’s bus system; keeping taxes low and spending even lower; focusing on infrastructure repairs; building more affordable housing; creating a “Team Hamilton” business development plan, and calling for a “New Deal” for Hamilton. Clark, in his document, points out that during Eisenberger’s four-year term from 2006 to 2010, the city’s budget ballooned 42 percent, leading to higher property taxes.

Clark also focuses on his theme that council in the past has concentrated too much on the downtown and has ignored the suburban areas.

But according to McHattie, despite what Clark does during the last week of the campaign, his support has stabilized.

“I really believe it’s between Fred and myself,” said McHattie, who has dismissed polls showing Eisenberger out front of both contenders.

McHattie says he is battling not only Eisenberger and his name recognition, but also Di Ianni, who earlier in the campaign threw his support behind Eisenberger. He believes if Eisenberger wins, Di Ianni will find himself a seat in the mayor’s office as well.

“It’s a package deal,” says McHattie.

McHattie says mayoral race is between him and Eisenberger

News Oct 20, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

 By Kevin Werner, News Staff

Hamilton mayoral candidate Brian McHattie says former mayor Fred Eisenberger “hasn’t earned the right” become the next chief magistrate of the city.

The Ward 1 councillor said after Eisenberger lost in the 2010 municipal election, placing third behind Bob Bratina and Larry Di Ianni, he “disappeared” for the next four years from the community. Instead of getting involved in community issues, such as the casino debate, and the airport lands, Eisenberger became the chief executive officer of the Canadian Urban Institute for about two years.

“I believe strongly you need to earn the right to be mayor,” said McHattie. “(Eisenberger) doesn’t deserve to be mayor.”

McHattie’s thoughts on the mayoral race took place when he released his 40-page campaign platform Oct. 20 that included all his ideas and pronouncements he wants to develop if he wins office Oct. 27.

“You see it in its entirety,” said McHattie, referring to his document. “It’s a whole picture, a whole ecosystem of ideas.”

Those proposals include a $22.5 million sidewalk and local roads fund; affordable housing; his four-part transit plan, which includes building the light-rail transit system; the creation of a Cootes Paradise to Escarpment National Park, and the establishment of a trees and park trust. McHattie acknowledge the 15 proposals have not been costed out except for his sidewalk plan and national park idea.

There are also no specific policies to improve Hamilton’s gender equity and diversity programs, other than McHattie’s willingness to push forward a new anti-racism centre that council deferred prior to the election. The gender equity issue became a prominent issue after a Ward 3 mayors’ debate. A day after the event, Eisenberger proposed a program to improve gender equity within the community.

“I commend Fred for picking up on that,” said McHattie.

About a month ago Eisenberger released his 17-page agenda that focuses on creating jobs, and boosting the economic development of the city.

McHattie says there is a “really clear difference” between Eisenberger’s and his platform, arguing his proposals are “evidence-based.”

He says Eisenberger’s campaign has yet to take off, saying “he hasn’t engaged to any great degree.”

He expected Eisenberger and his noteworthy supporter, former mayor Larry Di Ianni, to come out of the political race guns blazing. McHattie says that didn’t happen.

“I say where are these guys? What are they doing? It’s been a very sleepy campaign for Mr. Eisenberger,” said McHattie.

But the 11-year council veteran says with a week to go in what is turning into an interesting mayoral race, he finds his support is becoming a rising tide that is set to splash down on Oct. 27.

“There is a feeling,” says McHattie, who has about 400 volunteers on his campaign. “This has been building over the last two weeks. And it hasn’t peaked. We have one week to crystallize that.”

McHattie says the voter support moving towards his camp is at the expense of Eisenberger’s, especially onHamiltonMountain.

Meanwhile, Clark released his platform, also on Oct. 20, reiterating ideas that he has presented during the campaign so far, such as his opposition to light-rail transit, and support for what he calls “SmartTransit” that involves expanding the city’s bus system; keeping taxes low and spending even lower; focusing on infrastructure repairs; building more affordable housing; creating a “Team Hamilton” business development plan, and calling for a “New Deal” for Hamilton. Clark, in his document, points out that during Eisenberger’s four-year term from 2006 to 2010, the city’s budget ballooned 42 percent, leading to higher property taxes.

Clark also focuses on his theme that council in the past has concentrated too much on the downtown and has ignored the suburban areas.

But according to McHattie, despite what Clark does during the last week of the campaign, his support has stabilized.

“I really believe it’s between Fred and myself,” said McHattie, who has dismissed polls showing Eisenberger out front of both contenders.

McHattie says he is battling not only Eisenberger and his name recognition, but also Di Ianni, who earlier in the campaign threw his support behind Eisenberger. He believes if Eisenberger wins, Di Ianni will find himself a seat in the mayor’s office as well.

“It’s a package deal,” says McHattie.