Busing should be extended to all MacNab students, says parent

News Sep 24, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

By Gord Bowes, News staff

The public school board relented on busing for one group of students going to Sir Allan MacNab, but what about others in a similar situation, asks a Mountain parent.

“It seems to me they’re throwing them a bone,” said Robert Nixon. “If you want to be impartial, you should extend that same opportunity throughout the whole community.”

Some former students of Cardinal Heights are now taking a school bus to MacNab rather than the HSR after parents complained.

Because Hill Park Secondary School was closed a year earlier than planned, the latest crop of graduates from Cardinal Heights were given the choice of attending Nora Frances Henderson (formerly Barton).

Parents fought for the school bus they said was promised and two weeks into the school year the Hamilton Wentworth District School Board relented and will now provide one.

Nixon, who was a member of the committee that looked at elementary school closures on the central Mountain, said other students in the same boat should have been afforded the same treatment. Parents in the northeast corner of MacNab’s catchment were led to believe there would be a school bus, but that turned into HSR bus passes, he noted.

His daughter is among the many students who live significantly closer to Sherwood than MacNab — 3.3 km compared to 7.5 km in Nixon’s case — but because of new high school boundaries are forced to attend a school twice as far away.

“I think it should be blanketed across the entire catchment area so everyone can have the opportunity to take advantage of it,” he said.

Dawn Danko, a trustee candidate in Ward 7, says one of the planks in her platform could help such a situation.

She’s suggesting a pilot project where parents would be able to send their children to whatever school they want. Transportation would be provided in many scenarios, such as the students affected by the early closure of Hill Park.

“According to the school board, transportation costs are nothing compared to the cost of keeping schools open, so we need to find the money to meet the needs of our students,” said Danko. “The school board made this mess when they made their high school decisions. They need to be responsible for the students affected.”

“Certainly we must have capacity in our high schools that can deal with a shift in boundaries of a block or two.”

Danko said she doesn’t have an estimate on the cost for extra busing or the number of parents who might take advantage of her plan, but she expects most people will still choose the school closest to them.

Busing should be extended to all MacNab students, says parent

News Sep 24, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

By Gord Bowes, News staff

The public school board relented on busing for one group of students going to Sir Allan MacNab, but what about others in a similar situation, asks a Mountain parent.

“It seems to me they’re throwing them a bone,” said Robert Nixon. “If you want to be impartial, you should extend that same opportunity throughout the whole community.”

Some former students of Cardinal Heights are now taking a school bus to MacNab rather than the HSR after parents complained.

Because Hill Park Secondary School was closed a year earlier than planned, the latest crop of graduates from Cardinal Heights were given the choice of attending Nora Frances Henderson (formerly Barton).

Parents fought for the school bus they said was promised and two weeks into the school year the Hamilton Wentworth District School Board relented and will now provide one.

Nixon, who was a member of the committee that looked at elementary school closures on the central Mountain, said other students in the same boat should have been afforded the same treatment. Parents in the northeast corner of MacNab’s catchment were led to believe there would be a school bus, but that turned into HSR bus passes, he noted.

His daughter is among the many students who live significantly closer to Sherwood than MacNab — 3.3 km compared to 7.5 km in Nixon’s case — but because of new high school boundaries are forced to attend a school twice as far away.

“I think it should be blanketed across the entire catchment area so everyone can have the opportunity to take advantage of it,” he said.

Dawn Danko, a trustee candidate in Ward 7, says one of the planks in her platform could help such a situation.

She’s suggesting a pilot project where parents would be able to send their children to whatever school they want. Transportation would be provided in many scenarios, such as the students affected by the early closure of Hill Park.

“According to the school board, transportation costs are nothing compared to the cost of keeping schools open, so we need to find the money to meet the needs of our students,” said Danko. “The school board made this mess when they made their high school decisions. They need to be responsible for the students affected.”

“Certainly we must have capacity in our high schools that can deal with a shift in boundaries of a block or two.”

Danko said she doesn’t have an estimate on the cost for extra busing or the number of parents who might take advantage of her plan, but she expects most people will still choose the school closest to them.

Busing should be extended to all MacNab students, says parent

News Sep 24, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

By Gord Bowes, News staff

The public school board relented on busing for one group of students going to Sir Allan MacNab, but what about others in a similar situation, asks a Mountain parent.

“It seems to me they’re throwing them a bone,” said Robert Nixon. “If you want to be impartial, you should extend that same opportunity throughout the whole community.”

Some former students of Cardinal Heights are now taking a school bus to MacNab rather than the HSR after parents complained.

Because Hill Park Secondary School was closed a year earlier than planned, the latest crop of graduates from Cardinal Heights were given the choice of attending Nora Frances Henderson (formerly Barton).

Parents fought for the school bus they said was promised and two weeks into the school year the Hamilton Wentworth District School Board relented and will now provide one.

Nixon, who was a member of the committee that looked at elementary school closures on the central Mountain, said other students in the same boat should have been afforded the same treatment. Parents in the northeast corner of MacNab’s catchment were led to believe there would be a school bus, but that turned into HSR bus passes, he noted.

His daughter is among the many students who live significantly closer to Sherwood than MacNab — 3.3 km compared to 7.5 km in Nixon’s case — but because of new high school boundaries are forced to attend a school twice as far away.

“I think it should be blanketed across the entire catchment area so everyone can have the opportunity to take advantage of it,” he said.

Dawn Danko, a trustee candidate in Ward 7, says one of the planks in her platform could help such a situation.

She’s suggesting a pilot project where parents would be able to send their children to whatever school they want. Transportation would be provided in many scenarios, such as the students affected by the early closure of Hill Park.

“According to the school board, transportation costs are nothing compared to the cost of keeping schools open, so we need to find the money to meet the needs of our students,” said Danko. “The school board made this mess when they made their high school decisions. They need to be responsible for the students affected.”

“Certainly we must have capacity in our high schools that can deal with a shift in boundaries of a block or two.”

Danko said she doesn’t have an estimate on the cost for extra busing or the number of parents who might take advantage of her plan, but she expects most people will still choose the school closest to them.