Archer takes trustee plunge in Ward 6 for fourth time

News Sep 17, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

Bid to return to public board won’t involve nemesis this time around

By Richard Leitner, News Staff

At least Kathy Archer won’t be facing her arch rival when she tries to regain the east Mountain public school trustee seat she wrested from Laura Peddle by 65 votes in 2003 only to give it back by 91 in 2006.

Peddle, who won their 2010 rubber match by a comparatively comfortable 588 ballots, isn’t running in the Oct. 27 election, joining six other incumbents who’ve stepped down.

Archer, 54, admits the close losses were tough, but won’t comment on her nemesis’s performance, at least directly.

“All we hear here in our ward is lack of communication and that has always been an issue, even before I ran for school board trustee,” she said.

“When parents call, they would like a return call within at least 48 hours, 24 to 48 hours if it’s on the weekend. I still return my calls and emails.”

Archer, a retired school bus driver who runs Mountain Kidz Klub and still makes occasional appearances as Giggles the Clown, said she only registered earlier this month because she needed time to grieve her father’s death in January.

She faces first-time challengers Al Miles, Eamon O’Donnell, Tanya Prosser and Angie Armstrong, another late entrant who signed up just before last Friday’s 2 p.m. deadline.

Archer said if elected, she plans to revive the twice-yearly ward meetings she held during her previous term to hear constituents’ concerns.

She said she will also focus on better upkeep of schools and supports the five-year moratorium on school closures advocated by seven candidates, including Prosser, who have banded together around a common, “people’s mandate” platform.

Lawfield, Lisgar and Richard Beasley elementary schools were scheduled for an accommodation review this fall, but trustees voted to delay the study until next year.

“You can’t avoid the closing of schools, no matter what. That’s reality,” Archer said. “But the key factor is, I want to see the results of the children that are attending the smaller schools and (getting) better education,” she said.

“They’re talking about putting all the students into one big school and everybody getting along together. Well, how’s that going to help? I can’t see it.”

Archer takes trustee plunge in Ward 6 for fourth time

News Sep 17, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

Bid to return to public board won’t involve nemesis this time around

By Richard Leitner, News Staff

At least Kathy Archer won’t be facing her arch rival when she tries to regain the east Mountain public school trustee seat she wrested from Laura Peddle by 65 votes in 2003 only to give it back by 91 in 2006.

Peddle, who won their 2010 rubber match by a comparatively comfortable 588 ballots, isn’t running in the Oct. 27 election, joining six other incumbents who’ve stepped down.

Archer, 54, admits the close losses were tough, but won’t comment on her nemesis’s performance, at least directly.

“All we hear here in our ward is lack of communication and that has always been an issue, even before I ran for school board trustee,” she said.

“When parents call, they would like a return call within at least 48 hours, 24 to 48 hours if it’s on the weekend. I still return my calls and emails.”

Archer, a retired school bus driver who runs Mountain Kidz Klub and still makes occasional appearances as Giggles the Clown, said she only registered earlier this month because she needed time to grieve her father’s death in January.

She faces first-time challengers Al Miles, Eamon O’Donnell, Tanya Prosser and Angie Armstrong, another late entrant who signed up just before last Friday’s 2 p.m. deadline.

Archer said if elected, she plans to revive the twice-yearly ward meetings she held during her previous term to hear constituents’ concerns.

She said she will also focus on better upkeep of schools and supports the five-year moratorium on school closures advocated by seven candidates, including Prosser, who have banded together around a common, “people’s mandate” platform.

Lawfield, Lisgar and Richard Beasley elementary schools were scheduled for an accommodation review this fall, but trustees voted to delay the study until next year.

“You can’t avoid the closing of schools, no matter what. That’s reality,” Archer said. “But the key factor is, I want to see the results of the children that are attending the smaller schools and (getting) better education,” she said.

“They’re talking about putting all the students into one big school and everybody getting along together. Well, how’s that going to help? I can’t see it.”

Archer takes trustee plunge in Ward 6 for fourth time

News Sep 17, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

Bid to return to public board won’t involve nemesis this time around

By Richard Leitner, News Staff

At least Kathy Archer won’t be facing her arch rival when she tries to regain the east Mountain public school trustee seat she wrested from Laura Peddle by 65 votes in 2003 only to give it back by 91 in 2006.

Peddle, who won their 2010 rubber match by a comparatively comfortable 588 ballots, isn’t running in the Oct. 27 election, joining six other incumbents who’ve stepped down.

Archer, 54, admits the close losses were tough, but won’t comment on her nemesis’s performance, at least directly.

“All we hear here in our ward is lack of communication and that has always been an issue, even before I ran for school board trustee,” she said.

“When parents call, they would like a return call within at least 48 hours, 24 to 48 hours if it’s on the weekend. I still return my calls and emails.”

Archer, a retired school bus driver who runs Mountain Kidz Klub and still makes occasional appearances as Giggles the Clown, said she only registered earlier this month because she needed time to grieve her father’s death in January.

She faces first-time challengers Al Miles, Eamon O’Donnell, Tanya Prosser and Angie Armstrong, another late entrant who signed up just before last Friday’s 2 p.m. deadline.

Archer said if elected, she plans to revive the twice-yearly ward meetings she held during her previous term to hear constituents’ concerns.

She said she will also focus on better upkeep of schools and supports the five-year moratorium on school closures advocated by seven candidates, including Prosser, who have banded together around a common, “people’s mandate” platform.

Lawfield, Lisgar and Richard Beasley elementary schools were scheduled for an accommodation review this fall, but trustees voted to delay the study until next year.

“You can’t avoid the closing of schools, no matter what. That’s reality,” Archer said. “But the key factor is, I want to see the results of the children that are attending the smaller schools and (getting) better education,” she said.

“They’re talking about putting all the students into one big school and everybody getting along together. Well, how’s that going to help? I can’t see it.”