Traffic study, stop sign after speed complaints

News Sep 17, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

By Gord Bowes, News staff

An all-way stop is coming and speed bumps may be on the way for a central Mountain neighbourhood where residents have been complaining about speeders.

Ward 7 councillor Scott Duvall took the first step toward alleviating problems by getting council support for a three-way stop at Dicenzo Drive and Aquasanta Crescent.

A day earlier, he heard from residents at a public meeting who complained about who speed through the neighbourhood as they take a shortcut between Upper James and Stone Church.

Duvall said speed bumps may be installed next year following a traffic study.

That study, which will look at volume, speed and cut-through traffic, will be conducted this fall and assessed by staff before the end of the year, said Martin White, the city’s manager of traffic operations and engineering.

He said his department will consult with the area councillor and, depending on the findings, discuss a course of action with residents, White said.

“Traffic has studied the location several times before and has not been able to verify any speeding problem whatsoever,” he noted in an email.

White said the city has received about two complaints — usually about speeding but also about drivers using the route as a bypass — each year in the past few years.

Duvall said residents feel traffic calming measures are necessary to make the neighbourhood more safe.

“They feel it’s warranted,” he said.

The councillor told residents at the meeting complain to police every time they have a complaint in order to ensure their concerns are registered.

Traffic study, stop sign after speed complaints

News Sep 17, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

By Gord Bowes, News staff

An all-way stop is coming and speed bumps may be on the way for a central Mountain neighbourhood where residents have been complaining about speeders.

Ward 7 councillor Scott Duvall took the first step toward alleviating problems by getting council support for a three-way stop at Dicenzo Drive and Aquasanta Crescent.

A day earlier, he heard from residents at a public meeting who complained about who speed through the neighbourhood as they take a shortcut between Upper James and Stone Church.

Duvall said speed bumps may be installed next year following a traffic study.

That study, which will look at volume, speed and cut-through traffic, will be conducted this fall and assessed by staff before the end of the year, said Martin White, the city’s manager of traffic operations and engineering.

He said his department will consult with the area councillor and, depending on the findings, discuss a course of action with residents, White said.

“Traffic has studied the location several times before and has not been able to verify any speeding problem whatsoever,” he noted in an email.

White said the city has received about two complaints — usually about speeding but also about drivers using the route as a bypass — each year in the past few years.

Duvall said residents feel traffic calming measures are necessary to make the neighbourhood more safe.

“They feel it’s warranted,” he said.

The councillor told residents at the meeting complain to police every time they have a complaint in order to ensure their concerns are registered.

Traffic study, stop sign after speed complaints

News Sep 17, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

By Gord Bowes, News staff

An all-way stop is coming and speed bumps may be on the way for a central Mountain neighbourhood where residents have been complaining about speeders.

Ward 7 councillor Scott Duvall took the first step toward alleviating problems by getting council support for a three-way stop at Dicenzo Drive and Aquasanta Crescent.

A day earlier, he heard from residents at a public meeting who complained about who speed through the neighbourhood as they take a shortcut between Upper James and Stone Church.

Duvall said speed bumps may be installed next year following a traffic study.

That study, which will look at volume, speed and cut-through traffic, will be conducted this fall and assessed by staff before the end of the year, said Martin White, the city’s manager of traffic operations and engineering.

He said his department will consult with the area councillor and, depending on the findings, discuss a course of action with residents, White said.

“Traffic has studied the location several times before and has not been able to verify any speeding problem whatsoever,” he noted in an email.

White said the city has received about two complaints — usually about speeding but also about drivers using the route as a bypass — each year in the past few years.

Duvall said residents feel traffic calming measures are necessary to make the neighbourhood more safe.

“They feel it’s warranted,” he said.

The councillor told residents at the meeting complain to police every time they have a complaint in order to ensure their concerns are registered.