Mac student seeks to unseat veteran Hamilton school trustee Wes Hicks

News Sep 17, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

Youth an advantage, Chris Litfin maintains

By Richard Leitner, News Staff

Wes Hicks has been a west Mountain public school trustee longer than Chris Litfin has been alive.

Yet the 21-year-old McMaster University student says his youth is an advantage in his bid to unseat the Ward 8 veteran in the Oct. 27 election because he’s been out of high school for less than two years.

“I think I’m in a unique position to sort of present the view of the students in a way that, frankly, older people just can’t because even in the last five or 10 years there’s been massive changes in the way education is delivered,” he said.

Litfin, a lifelong Ward 1 resident, said he chose to run in Ward 8 because his lower-city area’s race already had five candidates.

He said he saw Hicks was the lone unopposed incumbent and felt people deserved a choice, especially after this past term’s controversial school closures, a process he called “a bit of a farce.”

“I can’t directly criticize him. He’s done a good job as a trustee; he’s represented his constituents well,” Litfin said. “But I think the mood of the public is that they want to see a fundamental change in how the school board operates.”

Hicks, trustee for 29 of the past 32 years, said he loves campaigning and will keep making student achievement his priority by supporting more resources to improve early literacy and math skills.

The retired Mohawk College dean said although any process is prone to human error, the goal of school closures is to make “all schools great schools” with a wide range of programs and modern facilities.

Hicks said key ward issues include resolving busing issues for students who live south of the Lincoln Alexander Parkway and are attending MacNab until the new high school is built by Rymal Road and Upper Sherman Avenue.

A volunteer junior basketball coach at MacNab, he declines to divulge his age, saying he’s in “top shape,” working out every day, running races and jogging 64 kilometres a week.

“I’ve always believed that age shouldn’t enter into any discussion with public service,” said Hicks, whose lone break from office came when he stepped down after his wife died. “I love it. It’s where I want to be.”

Mac student seeks to unseat veteran Hamilton school trustee Wes Hicks

News Sep 17, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

Youth an advantage, Chris Litfin maintains

By Richard Leitner, News Staff

Wes Hicks has been a west Mountain public school trustee longer than Chris Litfin has been alive.

Yet the 21-year-old McMaster University student says his youth is an advantage in his bid to unseat the Ward 8 veteran in the Oct. 27 election because he’s been out of high school for less than two years.

“I think I’m in a unique position to sort of present the view of the students in a way that, frankly, older people just can’t because even in the last five or 10 years there’s been massive changes in the way education is delivered,” he said.

Litfin, a lifelong Ward 1 resident, said he chose to run in Ward 8 because his lower-city area’s race already had five candidates.

He said he saw Hicks was the lone unopposed incumbent and felt people deserved a choice, especially after this past term’s controversial school closures, a process he called “a bit of a farce.”

“I can’t directly criticize him. He’s done a good job as a trustee; he’s represented his constituents well,” Litfin said. “But I think the mood of the public is that they want to see a fundamental change in how the school board operates.”

Hicks, trustee for 29 of the past 32 years, said he loves campaigning and will keep making student achievement his priority by supporting more resources to improve early literacy and math skills.

The retired Mohawk College dean said although any process is prone to human error, the goal of school closures is to make “all schools great schools” with a wide range of programs and modern facilities.

Hicks said key ward issues include resolving busing issues for students who live south of the Lincoln Alexander Parkway and are attending MacNab until the new high school is built by Rymal Road and Upper Sherman Avenue.

A volunteer junior basketball coach at MacNab, he declines to divulge his age, saying he’s in “top shape,” working out every day, running races and jogging 64 kilometres a week.

“I’ve always believed that age shouldn’t enter into any discussion with public service,” said Hicks, whose lone break from office came when he stepped down after his wife died. “I love it. It’s where I want to be.”

Mac student seeks to unseat veteran Hamilton school trustee Wes Hicks

News Sep 17, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

Youth an advantage, Chris Litfin maintains

By Richard Leitner, News Staff

Wes Hicks has been a west Mountain public school trustee longer than Chris Litfin has been alive.

Yet the 21-year-old McMaster University student says his youth is an advantage in his bid to unseat the Ward 8 veteran in the Oct. 27 election because he’s been out of high school for less than two years.

“I think I’m in a unique position to sort of present the view of the students in a way that, frankly, older people just can’t because even in the last five or 10 years there’s been massive changes in the way education is delivered,” he said.

Litfin, a lifelong Ward 1 resident, said he chose to run in Ward 8 because his lower-city area’s race already had five candidates.

He said he saw Hicks was the lone unopposed incumbent and felt people deserved a choice, especially after this past term’s controversial school closures, a process he called “a bit of a farce.”

“I can’t directly criticize him. He’s done a good job as a trustee; he’s represented his constituents well,” Litfin said. “But I think the mood of the public is that they want to see a fundamental change in how the school board operates.”

Hicks, trustee for 29 of the past 32 years, said he loves campaigning and will keep making student achievement his priority by supporting more resources to improve early literacy and math skills.

The retired Mohawk College dean said although any process is prone to human error, the goal of school closures is to make “all schools great schools” with a wide range of programs and modern facilities.

Hicks said key ward issues include resolving busing issues for students who live south of the Lincoln Alexander Parkway and are attending MacNab until the new high school is built by Rymal Road and Upper Sherman Avenue.

A volunteer junior basketball coach at MacNab, he declines to divulge his age, saying he’s in “top shape,” working out every day, running races and jogging 64 kilometres a week.

“I’ve always believed that age shouldn’t enter into any discussion with public service,” said Hicks, whose lone break from office came when he stepped down after his wife died. “I love it. It’s where I want to be.”