Henderson high school iPad rollout hits some bumps

News Sep 17, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

‘Not as simple as taking it out of the box,’ school learns

By Richard Leitner, News Staff

It turns out students aren’t always as hip to 21st-Century technology as expected.

That’s one of the lessons principal Rick Kunc is gleaning from hiccups in rolling out iPads to students at Nora Frances Henderson Secondary School as part of a two-year pilot project.

Although nearly all had their computer tablets by Friday – three days later than scheduled – he said the distribution “was definitely slow” despite being an overall success.

Kunc said he’s pleased students who were familiar with the iPads stepped in to help those who weren’t, prompting the idea of creating a student IT team to explain how to use the devices when needed.

“What we learned through the process was that it’s not as simple as taking it out of a box and handing it to them,” he said. “Some of the things that we assumed that students would be very comfortable doing and do on their own, they weren’t.”

Students at Henderson, Mountain Secondary and seven elementary schools in the north end are getting the iPads this fall as part of an $18-million plan to provide tablets to every student in grades 4 to 12 over the next five years.

While the school board will cut spending on textbooks to help pay for the iPads, Kunc said students won’t be staring at them all day.

He said they may put them away for some lessons, use them at home and bring questions to class for others, or use them to further explore an issue after classroom discussion.

Students might be asked to think about how technology affected the First World War, for instance, and after doing so use their iPads to research impacts they hadn’t considered.

“Before the teacher might have said, ‘Here’s how technology impacted,’ and they gave a note,” Kunc said. “They’ve changed how they’ve taught and they’ve leveraged the iPad in order for the kids to do it.”

While the iPad rollout didn’t go entirely as planned, the first week at Henderson – formerly Barton – had a pleasant surprise on enrolment.

Kunc said while numbers may change, the 740 students who registered to attend are above the expected 600 to 620 and reflect that it took some, especially those from Hill Park who lost their school in June, time to decide where to go.

He said the larger student body is “a huge positive” because it allows for a wider range of courses and extracurricular activities, including a new archery club, student tech crew and possibly a dance and drama club.

“It allows us in some cases to have both junior and senior, for example, volleyball teams, where if you have smaller student body oftentimes you can only run a varsity team.”

Henderson high school iPad rollout hits some bumps

News Sep 17, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

‘Not as simple as taking it out of the box,’ school learns

By Richard Leitner, News Staff

It turns out students aren’t always as hip to 21st-Century technology as expected.

That’s one of the lessons principal Rick Kunc is gleaning from hiccups in rolling out iPads to students at Nora Frances Henderson Secondary School as part of a two-year pilot project.

Although nearly all had their computer tablets by Friday – three days later than scheduled – he said the distribution “was definitely slow” despite being an overall success.

Kunc said he’s pleased students who were familiar with the iPads stepped in to help those who weren’t, prompting the idea of creating a student IT team to explain how to use the devices when needed.

“What we learned through the process was that it’s not as simple as taking it out of a box and handing it to them,” he said. “Some of the things that we assumed that students would be very comfortable doing and do on their own, they weren’t.”

Students at Henderson, Mountain Secondary and seven elementary schools in the north end are getting the iPads this fall as part of an $18-million plan to provide tablets to every student in grades 4 to 12 over the next five years.

While the school board will cut spending on textbooks to help pay for the iPads, Kunc said students won’t be staring at them all day.

He said they may put them away for some lessons, use them at home and bring questions to class for others, or use them to further explore an issue after classroom discussion.

Students might be asked to think about how technology affected the First World War, for instance, and after doing so use their iPads to research impacts they hadn’t considered.

“Before the teacher might have said, ‘Here’s how technology impacted,’ and they gave a note,” Kunc said. “They’ve changed how they’ve taught and they’ve leveraged the iPad in order for the kids to do it.”

While the iPad rollout didn’t go entirely as planned, the first week at Henderson – formerly Barton – had a pleasant surprise on enrolment.

Kunc said while numbers may change, the 740 students who registered to attend are above the expected 600 to 620 and reflect that it took some, especially those from Hill Park who lost their school in June, time to decide where to go.

He said the larger student body is “a huge positive” because it allows for a wider range of courses and extracurricular activities, including a new archery club, student tech crew and possibly a dance and drama club.

“It allows us in some cases to have both junior and senior, for example, volleyball teams, where if you have smaller student body oftentimes you can only run a varsity team.”

Henderson high school iPad rollout hits some bumps

News Sep 17, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

‘Not as simple as taking it out of the box,’ school learns

By Richard Leitner, News Staff

It turns out students aren’t always as hip to 21st-Century technology as expected.

That’s one of the lessons principal Rick Kunc is gleaning from hiccups in rolling out iPads to students at Nora Frances Henderson Secondary School as part of a two-year pilot project.

Although nearly all had their computer tablets by Friday – three days later than scheduled – he said the distribution “was definitely slow” despite being an overall success.

Kunc said he’s pleased students who were familiar with the iPads stepped in to help those who weren’t, prompting the idea of creating a student IT team to explain how to use the devices when needed.

“What we learned through the process was that it’s not as simple as taking it out of a box and handing it to them,” he said. “Some of the things that we assumed that students would be very comfortable doing and do on their own, they weren’t.”

Students at Henderson, Mountain Secondary and seven elementary schools in the north end are getting the iPads this fall as part of an $18-million plan to provide tablets to every student in grades 4 to 12 over the next five years.

While the school board will cut spending on textbooks to help pay for the iPads, Kunc said students won’t be staring at them all day.

He said they may put them away for some lessons, use them at home and bring questions to class for others, or use them to further explore an issue after classroom discussion.

Students might be asked to think about how technology affected the First World War, for instance, and after doing so use their iPads to research impacts they hadn’t considered.

“Before the teacher might have said, ‘Here’s how technology impacted,’ and they gave a note,” Kunc said. “They’ve changed how they’ve taught and they’ve leveraged the iPad in order for the kids to do it.”

While the iPad rollout didn’t go entirely as planned, the first week at Henderson – formerly Barton – had a pleasant surprise on enrolment.

Kunc said while numbers may change, the 740 students who registered to attend are above the expected 600 to 620 and reflect that it took some, especially those from Hill Park who lost their school in June, time to decide where to go.

He said the larger student body is “a huge positive” because it allows for a wider range of courses and extracurricular activities, including a new archery club, student tech crew and possibly a dance and drama club.

“It allows us in some cases to have both junior and senior, for example, volleyball teams, where if you have smaller student body oftentimes you can only run a varsity team.”