Water main work on east Mountain

News Sep 08, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

By Gord Bowes, News staff

About two kilometres of water mains are being relined rather than replaced in an east Mountain neighbourhood.

A structural lining, using a resin-based material, is being installed in the existing eight-inch pipes in a project that began last month.

The result will be “a new water main inside an existing water main,” said Erika Waite, a senior project manager in the city’s public works department.

“You don’t have to dig up a street or damage a road that may not be in need of repair for the next 10 to 15 years,” she said. “It’s cheaper and it’s a lot faster.”

Waite said the relining is similar to work the city does with sewer mains, except pits must be dug at each end of the water line in order to access the interior. With sewers relining, workers gain access through existing manholes.

Relining instead of digging up and replacing pipes results in a cost savings of between 20 per cent and 50 per cent, she said.

“In spite of the short-term inconvenience, these are very much needed, long-term, proactive infrastructure upgrades,” said Ward 6 councillor Tom Jackson.

He said after the work is done there will be less of a chance of flooding due to water main breaks, which have been a problem in the neighbourhood.

The work was originally to be completed by the end of this month, but after a notice to residents was sent out, several streets were added to the project, said John Cowperthwaite, project manager.

Weather permitting, it should now finished, and the roads restored, by the end of October, he said.

“Under normal circumstances we wouldn’t do such a large area, but this is taking advantage of the technology so we can repair more water mains and get it done in one construction season,” said Cowperthwaite.

Some catch basins are also being repaired at the same time, he said.

Water main relining is being proposed for some streets in the Hill Park neighbourhood for 2015; it would have to be approved in next year’s capital budget.

Water main work on east Mountain

News Sep 08, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

By Gord Bowes, News staff

About two kilometres of water mains are being relined rather than replaced in an east Mountain neighbourhood.

A structural lining, using a resin-based material, is being installed in the existing eight-inch pipes in a project that began last month.

The result will be “a new water main inside an existing water main,” said Erika Waite, a senior project manager in the city’s public works department.

“You don’t have to dig up a street or damage a road that may not be in need of repair for the next 10 to 15 years,” she said. “It’s cheaper and it’s a lot faster.”

Waite said the relining is similar to work the city does with sewer mains, except pits must be dug at each end of the water line in order to access the interior. With sewers relining, workers gain access through existing manholes.

Relining instead of digging up and replacing pipes results in a cost savings of between 20 per cent and 50 per cent, she said.

“In spite of the short-term inconvenience, these are very much needed, long-term, proactive infrastructure upgrades,” said Ward 6 councillor Tom Jackson.

He said after the work is done there will be less of a chance of flooding due to water main breaks, which have been a problem in the neighbourhood.

The work was originally to be completed by the end of this month, but after a notice to residents was sent out, several streets were added to the project, said John Cowperthwaite, project manager.

Weather permitting, it should now finished, and the roads restored, by the end of October, he said.

“Under normal circumstances we wouldn’t do such a large area, but this is taking advantage of the technology so we can repair more water mains and get it done in one construction season,” said Cowperthwaite.

Some catch basins are also being repaired at the same time, he said.

Water main relining is being proposed for some streets in the Hill Park neighbourhood for 2015; it would have to be approved in next year’s capital budget.

Water main work on east Mountain

News Sep 08, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

By Gord Bowes, News staff

About two kilometres of water mains are being relined rather than replaced in an east Mountain neighbourhood.

A structural lining, using a resin-based material, is being installed in the existing eight-inch pipes in a project that began last month.

The result will be “a new water main inside an existing water main,” said Erika Waite, a senior project manager in the city’s public works department.

“You don’t have to dig up a street or damage a road that may not be in need of repair for the next 10 to 15 years,” she said. “It’s cheaper and it’s a lot faster.”

Waite said the relining is similar to work the city does with sewer mains, except pits must be dug at each end of the water line in order to access the interior. With sewers relining, workers gain access through existing manholes.

Relining instead of digging up and replacing pipes results in a cost savings of between 20 per cent and 50 per cent, she said.

“In spite of the short-term inconvenience, these are very much needed, long-term, proactive infrastructure upgrades,” said Ward 6 councillor Tom Jackson.

He said after the work is done there will be less of a chance of flooding due to water main breaks, which have been a problem in the neighbourhood.

The work was originally to be completed by the end of this month, but after a notice to residents was sent out, several streets were added to the project, said John Cowperthwaite, project manager.

Weather permitting, it should now finished, and the roads restored, by the end of October, he said.

“Under normal circumstances we wouldn’t do such a large area, but this is taking advantage of the technology so we can repair more water mains and get it done in one construction season,” said Cowperthwaite.

Some catch basins are also being repaired at the same time, he said.

Water main relining is being proposed for some streets in the Hill Park neighbourhood for 2015; it would have to be approved in next year’s capital budget.