Vandalism probe prompted Mountain principal switch, HWDSB boss says

News Sep 02, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

By Richard Leitner, News Staff

The sudden ouster of Paul Beattie as the new principal of Mountain Secondary School is being attributed to vandalism and the removal of “a large number of items” at his former vocational high school as it closed for good in June.

Education director John Malloy said an ongoing investigation found evidence of “inappropriate graffiti throughout, vandalism and items missing” at Parkview Secondary School, some of which occurred during the school day.

He said the probe prompted the decision to instead appoint Brian Lennox as principal, a move conveyed in a letter to parents on Aug. 28.

Malloy said Lennox, who was most recently vice-principal at Henderson high school, has a background in special education and the board is “very confident that this transition is something he can lead very well.”

He said he is aware he promised in February that Beattie would be principal to help Parkview students who are transferring to Mountain adjust to their new school, but the board couldn’t ignore the end-of year incidents.

“Obviously, this type of action is a violation of our board expectations and operations of schools and so forth,” Malloy said, declining to discuss Beattie’s employment status, citing the ongoing review and confidentiality of personnel matters.

“I know some are concerned about, ‘Why did we learn about this so late?’ It’s because we’re balancing the need to be fair as well as the desire to be sure that our students are OK,” he said. “Safety, orderly environment, supervision, are part of what is expected.”

School superintendent Michael Prendergast said Mountain is expected to have between 180 and 200 students this year in Grade 10 and up.

That’s about 100 more than last year, with most of the new students coming from Parkview, he said. The vocational school won’t be taking any new students after this fall as part of a phased closure in June 2017.

Prendergast said Mountain “had lots of upgrades over the summer,” including to its cooking and baking facilities.

He said students will also be receiving iPads this fall as part of a pilot project that could eventually provide the computer tablets to every student in Grade 4 and up in the next five years.

Prendergast said other changes will see Mountain offer the arts-based Excite program transferred from Parkview.

He said the self-sustaining program allows students to work with local shopkeepers and vendors as they recycle old furniture for resale.

“They make some amazing stuff and it was very well received in the community last year,” he said. “They would have the opportunity to learn some skills around communication in a sales light, but also do the math and all the bookkeeping.”

Vandalism probe prompted Mountain principal switch, HWDSB boss says

News Sep 02, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

By Richard Leitner, News Staff

The sudden ouster of Paul Beattie as the new principal of Mountain Secondary School is being attributed to vandalism and the removal of “a large number of items” at his former vocational high school as it closed for good in June.

Education director John Malloy said an ongoing investigation found evidence of “inappropriate graffiti throughout, vandalism and items missing” at Parkview Secondary School, some of which occurred during the school day.

He said the probe prompted the decision to instead appoint Brian Lennox as principal, a move conveyed in a letter to parents on Aug. 28.

Malloy said Lennox, who was most recently vice-principal at Henderson high school, has a background in special education and the board is “very confident that this transition is something he can lead very well.”

He said he is aware he promised in February that Beattie would be principal to help Parkview students who are transferring to Mountain adjust to their new school, but the board couldn’t ignore the end-of year incidents.

“Obviously, this type of action is a violation of our board expectations and operations of schools and so forth,” Malloy said, declining to discuss Beattie’s employment status, citing the ongoing review and confidentiality of personnel matters.

“I know some are concerned about, ‘Why did we learn about this so late?’ It’s because we’re balancing the need to be fair as well as the desire to be sure that our students are OK,” he said. “Safety, orderly environment, supervision, are part of what is expected.”

School superintendent Michael Prendergast said Mountain is expected to have between 180 and 200 students this year in Grade 10 and up.

That’s about 100 more than last year, with most of the new students coming from Parkview, he said. The vocational school won’t be taking any new students after this fall as part of a phased closure in June 2017.

Prendergast said Mountain “had lots of upgrades over the summer,” including to its cooking and baking facilities.

He said students will also be receiving iPads this fall as part of a pilot project that could eventually provide the computer tablets to every student in Grade 4 and up in the next five years.

Prendergast said other changes will see Mountain offer the arts-based Excite program transferred from Parkview.

He said the self-sustaining program allows students to work with local shopkeepers and vendors as they recycle old furniture for resale.

“They make some amazing stuff and it was very well received in the community last year,” he said. “They would have the opportunity to learn some skills around communication in a sales light, but also do the math and all the bookkeeping.”

Vandalism probe prompted Mountain principal switch, HWDSB boss says

News Sep 02, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

By Richard Leitner, News Staff

The sudden ouster of Paul Beattie as the new principal of Mountain Secondary School is being attributed to vandalism and the removal of “a large number of items” at his former vocational high school as it closed for good in June.

Education director John Malloy said an ongoing investigation found evidence of “inappropriate graffiti throughout, vandalism and items missing” at Parkview Secondary School, some of which occurred during the school day.

He said the probe prompted the decision to instead appoint Brian Lennox as principal, a move conveyed in a letter to parents on Aug. 28.

Malloy said Lennox, who was most recently vice-principal at Henderson high school, has a background in special education and the board is “very confident that this transition is something he can lead very well.”

He said he is aware he promised in February that Beattie would be principal to help Parkview students who are transferring to Mountain adjust to their new school, but the board couldn’t ignore the end-of year incidents.

“Obviously, this type of action is a violation of our board expectations and operations of schools and so forth,” Malloy said, declining to discuss Beattie’s employment status, citing the ongoing review and confidentiality of personnel matters.

“I know some are concerned about, ‘Why did we learn about this so late?’ It’s because we’re balancing the need to be fair as well as the desire to be sure that our students are OK,” he said. “Safety, orderly environment, supervision, are part of what is expected.”

School superintendent Michael Prendergast said Mountain is expected to have between 180 and 200 students this year in Grade 10 and up.

That’s about 100 more than last year, with most of the new students coming from Parkview, he said. The vocational school won’t be taking any new students after this fall as part of a phased closure in June 2017.

Prendergast said Mountain “had lots of upgrades over the summer,” including to its cooking and baking facilities.

He said students will also be receiving iPads this fall as part of a pilot project that could eventually provide the computer tablets to every student in Grade 4 and up in the next five years.

Prendergast said other changes will see Mountain offer the arts-based Excite program transferred from Parkview.

He said the self-sustaining program allows students to work with local shopkeepers and vendors as they recycle old furniture for resale.

“They make some amazing stuff and it was very well received in the community last year,” he said. “They would have the opportunity to learn some skills around communication in a sales light, but also do the math and all the bookkeeping.”