Proposed new Pan Am Games stadium not setting sail from harbour lands

News Nov 19, 2009 Ancaster News

Hamilton’s proposed new stadium for the 2015 Pan Am Games will be located on the west harbour lands...for now.

But council will ultimately make the final decision on where the stadium will be constructed.

City manager Chris Murray said the preferred $45-million stadium site, which council selected in February 2009, is the Bay to Queen, and Barton to Stuart location.

City staff is currently crafting a business case study on the impact a stadium will have in the west harbour area, and whether it will be feasible, he said. Part of the study will examine the private financing options available. That could mean, said Murray, if a private investor wanted an alternative location, city staff and councillors would have to consider the option.

Recently, Hamilton Tiger-Cats owner Bob Young has suggested Aldershot, which has highway access and public transportation, as an alternate location. If the stadium is to be used by the football team, it needs to be expanded to a 27,000-seat stadium, at a cost of an additional $30 million, which could be funded by the Tiger-Cats.

There has also been some suggestion that the Confederation site be reexamined as a possible

location. Councillors earlier this year rejected the site as the city’s preferred location. Other areas for a stadium under consideration were downtown and somewhere in the airport employment lands.

Mayor Fred Eisenberger has emphasized after the city won the right to host the global sporting event, his preference for the stadium is in the west harbour area.

Murray said during a presentation to the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation’s Hamilton Housing Outlook Conference a stadium on the waterfront will reenergize the city’s downtown area.

“There is a great opportunity to spur economic development,” he said.

He acknowledged there will be some problems created by the stadium that will need to be solved, including creating a proper transportation plan to mitigate potential vehicle tie-ups in the area.

He said there are also “significant” economic opportunities for the property where the 1930 Ivor Wynne Stadium is located in the east end. Once the new stadium is opened, developing the old stadium can begin to revitalize the east-end neighbourhood.

In answer to a question, Murray promised the city will retain control of a new stadium regardless of who or what business the municipality partners with to build it.

“We are not going to give it away,” he said.

“With $60 million (the city’s contribution to the Pan Am Games), we will think long and hard. It’s early in the game (but) we will have a controlling interest.”

Proposed new Pan Am Games stadium not setting sail from harbour lands

News Nov 19, 2009 Ancaster News

Hamilton’s proposed new stadium for the 2015 Pan Am Games will be located on the west harbour lands...for now.

But council will ultimately make the final decision on where the stadium will be constructed.

City manager Chris Murray said the preferred $45-million stadium site, which council selected in February 2009, is the Bay to Queen, and Barton to Stuart location.

City staff is currently crafting a business case study on the impact a stadium will have in the west harbour area, and whether it will be feasible, he said. Part of the study will examine the private financing options available. That could mean, said Murray, if a private investor wanted an alternative location, city staff and councillors would have to consider the option.

Recently, Hamilton Tiger-Cats owner Bob Young has suggested Aldershot, which has highway access and public transportation, as an alternate location. If the stadium is to be used by the football team, it needs to be expanded to a 27,000-seat stadium, at a cost of an additional $30 million, which could be funded by the Tiger-Cats.

There has also been some suggestion that the Confederation site be reexamined as a possible

location. Councillors earlier this year rejected the site as the city’s preferred location. Other areas for a stadium under consideration were downtown and somewhere in the airport employment lands.

Mayor Fred Eisenberger has emphasized after the city won the right to host the global sporting event, his preference for the stadium is in the west harbour area.

Murray said during a presentation to the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation’s Hamilton Housing Outlook Conference a stadium on the waterfront will reenergize the city’s downtown area.

“There is a great opportunity to spur economic development,” he said.

He acknowledged there will be some problems created by the stadium that will need to be solved, including creating a proper transportation plan to mitigate potential vehicle tie-ups in the area.

He said there are also “significant” economic opportunities for the property where the 1930 Ivor Wynne Stadium is located in the east end. Once the new stadium is opened, developing the old stadium can begin to revitalize the east-end neighbourhood.

In answer to a question, Murray promised the city will retain control of a new stadium regardless of who or what business the municipality partners with to build it.

“We are not going to give it away,” he said.

“With $60 million (the city’s contribution to the Pan Am Games), we will think long and hard. It’s early in the game (but) we will have a controlling interest.”

Proposed new Pan Am Games stadium not setting sail from harbour lands

News Nov 19, 2009 Ancaster News

Hamilton’s proposed new stadium for the 2015 Pan Am Games will be located on the west harbour lands...for now.

But council will ultimately make the final decision on where the stadium will be constructed.

City manager Chris Murray said the preferred $45-million stadium site, which council selected in February 2009, is the Bay to Queen, and Barton to Stuart location.

City staff is currently crafting a business case study on the impact a stadium will have in the west harbour area, and whether it will be feasible, he said. Part of the study will examine the private financing options available. That could mean, said Murray, if a private investor wanted an alternative location, city staff and councillors would have to consider the option.

Recently, Hamilton Tiger-Cats owner Bob Young has suggested Aldershot, which has highway access and public transportation, as an alternate location. If the stadium is to be used by the football team, it needs to be expanded to a 27,000-seat stadium, at a cost of an additional $30 million, which could be funded by the Tiger-Cats.

There has also been some suggestion that the Confederation site be reexamined as a possible

location. Councillors earlier this year rejected the site as the city’s preferred location. Other areas for a stadium under consideration were downtown and somewhere in the airport employment lands.

Mayor Fred Eisenberger has emphasized after the city won the right to host the global sporting event, his preference for the stadium is in the west harbour area.

Murray said during a presentation to the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation’s Hamilton Housing Outlook Conference a stadium on the waterfront will reenergize the city’s downtown area.

“There is a great opportunity to spur economic development,” he said.

He acknowledged there will be some problems created by the stadium that will need to be solved, including creating a proper transportation plan to mitigate potential vehicle tie-ups in the area.

He said there are also “significant” economic opportunities for the property where the 1930 Ivor Wynne Stadium is located in the east end. Once the new stadium is opened, developing the old stadium can begin to revitalize the east-end neighbourhood.

In answer to a question, Murray promised the city will retain control of a new stadium regardless of who or what business the municipality partners with to build it.

“We are not going to give it away,” he said.

“With $60 million (the city’s contribution to the Pan Am Games), we will think long and hard. It’s early in the game (but) we will have a controlling interest.”