City cops have minimal impact on victim compensation fund

News Nov 19, 2009 Ancaster News

Hamilton Police have had a minimal impact on a compensation fund they are fully entitled to draw from, Chief Brian Mullan reported this week.

The chief responded to province-wide questions about police accessing money from the Criminal Injuries Compensation Board, and if that fund was intended specifically for civilian crime victims.

According to a report to the Police Services Board, the first compensation program began in 1967 under the Law Enforcement Compensation Act.

“This program provided funds to peace officers, police officers and firefighters for injuries arising from criminal acts,” the report states.

In 1971, the act was replaced by the new Compensation for Victims of Crime Act and the Criminal Injuries Compensation Board. Under the new act, the board was able to award compensation to any victim of a violent crime that occurred in Ontario.

The report notes the legislation specifically identifies any person injured while “lawfully arresting or attempting to arrest an offender or suspected offender” and “preventing or attempting to prevent the commission of an offence or suspected offence” as being the victim of a compensable injury.

The report also highlights section 17(3) of the act which states the board, when assessing compensation, shall consider any benefit or compensation paid to the victim from any other source other than social assistance.

“WSIB eligibility is taken into account, so it’s not a case of double- dipping,” Mullan said, adding fewer than 25 members of the Hamilton Police Service have received compensation from the Criminal Injuries Compensation Board.

City cops have minimal impact on victim compensation fund

News Nov 19, 2009 Ancaster News

Hamilton Police have had a minimal impact on a compensation fund they are fully entitled to draw from, Chief Brian Mullan reported this week.

The chief responded to province-wide questions about police accessing money from the Criminal Injuries Compensation Board, and if that fund was intended specifically for civilian crime victims.

According to a report to the Police Services Board, the first compensation program began in 1967 under the Law Enforcement Compensation Act.

“This program provided funds to peace officers, police officers and firefighters for injuries arising from criminal acts,” the report states.

In 1971, the act was replaced by the new Compensation for Victims of Crime Act and the Criminal Injuries Compensation Board. Under the new act, the board was able to award compensation to any victim of a violent crime that occurred in Ontario.

The report notes the legislation specifically identifies any person injured while “lawfully arresting or attempting to arrest an offender or suspected offender” and “preventing or attempting to prevent the commission of an offence or suspected offence” as being the victim of a compensable injury.

The report also highlights section 17(3) of the act which states the board, when assessing compensation, shall consider any benefit or compensation paid to the victim from any other source other than social assistance.

“WSIB eligibility is taken into account, so it’s not a case of double- dipping,” Mullan said, adding fewer than 25 members of the Hamilton Police Service have received compensation from the Criminal Injuries Compensation Board.

City cops have minimal impact on victim compensation fund

News Nov 19, 2009 Ancaster News

Hamilton Police have had a minimal impact on a compensation fund they are fully entitled to draw from, Chief Brian Mullan reported this week.

The chief responded to province-wide questions about police accessing money from the Criminal Injuries Compensation Board, and if that fund was intended specifically for civilian crime victims.

According to a report to the Police Services Board, the first compensation program began in 1967 under the Law Enforcement Compensation Act.

“This program provided funds to peace officers, police officers and firefighters for injuries arising from criminal acts,” the report states.

In 1971, the act was replaced by the new Compensation for Victims of Crime Act and the Criminal Injuries Compensation Board. Under the new act, the board was able to award compensation to any victim of a violent crime that occurred in Ontario.

The report notes the legislation specifically identifies any person injured while “lawfully arresting or attempting to arrest an offender or suspected offender” and “preventing or attempting to prevent the commission of an offence or suspected offence” as being the victim of a compensable injury.

The report also highlights section 17(3) of the act which states the board, when assessing compensation, shall consider any benefit or compensation paid to the victim from any other source other than social assistance.

“WSIB eligibility is taken into account, so it’s not a case of double- dipping,” Mullan said, adding fewer than 25 members of the Hamilton Police Service have received compensation from the Criminal Injuries Compensation Board.