Shelter gives abandoned pets a second chance

News Nov 19, 2009 Ancaster News

They are abandoned, forgotten, or left to fend for themselves in the unforgiving wild. Some are newborn kittens. Others are longtime family pets, inexplicably dumped on the side of the road.

Every rescued animal has its own unique story. But thanks to the Collins family of Ancaster, these forgotten cats and dogs receive a second chance in a new home.

A portion of A. Glen Saxon Kennels Dog Boarding and Cattery on Trinity Road is allotted to orphaned and abandoned animals for Flamborough Animal Services.

As the contracted provider of animal control services for Flamborough, Rick Collins patrols rural roads looking for lost or abandoned animals.

Recently, while responding to a call on Sager Road in the North Dumfries area, he spotted what was reportedly a dead raccoon, or some other small animal. Upon further inspection, the animal was identified as a small dog, barely clinging to life.

Severely emaciated, the young Shih tzu was jaundiced, covered with sores and unable to walk. He was virtually bald, and what little hair he had left was completely matted.

Nicknamed Bones by his rescuers for his emaciated condition, the dog also lacked social skills. Collins’ wife, Charmaine, suspects Bones may have been born at a puppy mill. His age is estimated at 18 months.

“We honestly didn’t think he was going to make it,” said Rick, describing Bones’ first evening at the shelter.

After weeks of steady progress, Bones is well on his way to a full recovery. By next month he will be available for adoption into a permanent home. Bones still needs some blood work to ensure he has no long term health issues.

Before he is placed with a new family, he will also be vaccinated and neutered. After more than a month at the shelter, Bones is a family favourite. Daughter Monica, 5, enjoys spending time with the playful dog. Rick and Charmaine plan to interview potential candidates to ensure Bones enters a good home.

Along with Bones, four other dogs are now staying at the shelter awaiting adoption. Although the Collins are paid to provide Flamborough’s animal control services, the shelter itself receives no outside funding. The family is under no obligation to find adoptive homes for the animals.

“When you love animals, that’s just what you do,” Charmaine said. “How can you turn your back on them?”

A young female Rottweiler known as Pumpkin is another new addition to the shelter. When Rick first brought her home, Pumpkin was dangerously emaciated. On the ride back to the shelter, she vomited a large quantity of pumpkin, which may have been the only food source available. She was discovered by a homeowner in a shed on Westover Road.

On a typical week, Rick will find one or two lost or abandoned dogs on rural Flamborough roads. As Charmaine explained, when a dog is found sitting in the same location for several days, chances are its owner dropped it off with no intention of returning.

“Dogs who are lost keep moving,” Charmaine said. “Dogs who are abandoned just stay because they can’t find their direction.”

Earlier this year, Rick was called to pick up a female golden Labrador cross at the Flamborough Speedway. Nicknamed Old Yeller, the dog is friendly and follows them around the kennel. Rick believes the dog was a longtime family pet that was abandoned for some unknown reason.

The shelter currently has about 30 cats available for adoption. The rescued felines range from kittens to older adult cats. Families can adopt a kitten for a nominal fee of $35, which includes vaccinations, de-worming and a de-flea. Adult cats are spayed and neutered prior to adoption for a $100 fee.

All dogs are vaccinated, de-wormed and spayed or neutered before entering their permanent home. The kennel also offers a discount for boarding services for the life of the dog. A donation is required to adopt a dog, which helps defray shelter costs and medical expenses.

Bones should be available for adoption in a few weeks. He has already been vaccinated and de-wormed, but still requires neutering and blood work.

The Collins are currently looking for donations of time and supplies, such as cat litter and food, to help defray the shelter’s operating costs.

While Charmaine knows the shelter is helping to save animal’s lives, she also credits the animals for surviving against long odds. Bones is her prime example.

“They have to have the will to live, too and I think he does,” Charmaine said.

For more information on the shelter or to inquire about volunteering, visit www.aglensaxon.com or call 905-648-6955.

Shelter gives abandoned pets a second chance

News Nov 19, 2009 Ancaster News

They are abandoned, forgotten, or left to fend for themselves in the unforgiving wild. Some are newborn kittens. Others are longtime family pets, inexplicably dumped on the side of the road.

Every rescued animal has its own unique story. But thanks to the Collins family of Ancaster, these forgotten cats and dogs receive a second chance in a new home.

A portion of A. Glen Saxon Kennels Dog Boarding and Cattery on Trinity Road is allotted to orphaned and abandoned animals for Flamborough Animal Services.

As the contracted provider of animal control services for Flamborough, Rick Collins patrols rural roads looking for lost or abandoned animals.

Recently, while responding to a call on Sager Road in the North Dumfries area, he spotted what was reportedly a dead raccoon, or some other small animal. Upon further inspection, the animal was identified as a small dog, barely clinging to life.

Severely emaciated, the young Shih tzu was jaundiced, covered with sores and unable to walk. He was virtually bald, and what little hair he had left was completely matted.

Nicknamed Bones by his rescuers for his emaciated condition, the dog also lacked social skills. Collins’ wife, Charmaine, suspects Bones may have been born at a puppy mill. His age is estimated at 18 months.

“We honestly didn’t think he was going to make it,” said Rick, describing Bones’ first evening at the shelter.

After weeks of steady progress, Bones is well on his way to a full recovery. By next month he will be available for adoption into a permanent home. Bones still needs some blood work to ensure he has no long term health issues.

Before he is placed with a new family, he will also be vaccinated and neutered. After more than a month at the shelter, Bones is a family favourite. Daughter Monica, 5, enjoys spending time with the playful dog. Rick and Charmaine plan to interview potential candidates to ensure Bones enters a good home.

Along with Bones, four other dogs are now staying at the shelter awaiting adoption. Although the Collins are paid to provide Flamborough’s animal control services, the shelter itself receives no outside funding. The family is under no obligation to find adoptive homes for the animals.

“When you love animals, that’s just what you do,” Charmaine said. “How can you turn your back on them?”

A young female Rottweiler known as Pumpkin is another new addition to the shelter. When Rick first brought her home, Pumpkin was dangerously emaciated. On the ride back to the shelter, she vomited a large quantity of pumpkin, which may have been the only food source available. She was discovered by a homeowner in a shed on Westover Road.

On a typical week, Rick will find one or two lost or abandoned dogs on rural Flamborough roads. As Charmaine explained, when a dog is found sitting in the same location for several days, chances are its owner dropped it off with no intention of returning.

“Dogs who are lost keep moving,” Charmaine said. “Dogs who are abandoned just stay because they can’t find their direction.”

Earlier this year, Rick was called to pick up a female golden Labrador cross at the Flamborough Speedway. Nicknamed Old Yeller, the dog is friendly and follows them around the kennel. Rick believes the dog was a longtime family pet that was abandoned for some unknown reason.

The shelter currently has about 30 cats available for adoption. The rescued felines range from kittens to older adult cats. Families can adopt a kitten for a nominal fee of $35, which includes vaccinations, de-worming and a de-flea. Adult cats are spayed and neutered prior to adoption for a $100 fee.

All dogs are vaccinated, de-wormed and spayed or neutered before entering their permanent home. The kennel also offers a discount for boarding services for the life of the dog. A donation is required to adopt a dog, which helps defray shelter costs and medical expenses.

Bones should be available for adoption in a few weeks. He has already been vaccinated and de-wormed, but still requires neutering and blood work.

The Collins are currently looking for donations of time and supplies, such as cat litter and food, to help defray the shelter’s operating costs.

While Charmaine knows the shelter is helping to save animal’s lives, she also credits the animals for surviving against long odds. Bones is her prime example.

“They have to have the will to live, too and I think he does,” Charmaine said.

For more information on the shelter or to inquire about volunteering, visit www.aglensaxon.com or call 905-648-6955.

Shelter gives abandoned pets a second chance

News Nov 19, 2009 Ancaster News

They are abandoned, forgotten, or left to fend for themselves in the unforgiving wild. Some are newborn kittens. Others are longtime family pets, inexplicably dumped on the side of the road.

Every rescued animal has its own unique story. But thanks to the Collins family of Ancaster, these forgotten cats and dogs receive a second chance in a new home.

A portion of A. Glen Saxon Kennels Dog Boarding and Cattery on Trinity Road is allotted to orphaned and abandoned animals for Flamborough Animal Services.

As the contracted provider of animal control services for Flamborough, Rick Collins patrols rural roads looking for lost or abandoned animals.

Recently, while responding to a call on Sager Road in the North Dumfries area, he spotted what was reportedly a dead raccoon, or some other small animal. Upon further inspection, the animal was identified as a small dog, barely clinging to life.

Severely emaciated, the young Shih tzu was jaundiced, covered with sores and unable to walk. He was virtually bald, and what little hair he had left was completely matted.

Nicknamed Bones by his rescuers for his emaciated condition, the dog also lacked social skills. Collins’ wife, Charmaine, suspects Bones may have been born at a puppy mill. His age is estimated at 18 months.

“We honestly didn’t think he was going to make it,” said Rick, describing Bones’ first evening at the shelter.

After weeks of steady progress, Bones is well on his way to a full recovery. By next month he will be available for adoption into a permanent home. Bones still needs some blood work to ensure he has no long term health issues.

Before he is placed with a new family, he will also be vaccinated and neutered. After more than a month at the shelter, Bones is a family favourite. Daughter Monica, 5, enjoys spending time with the playful dog. Rick and Charmaine plan to interview potential candidates to ensure Bones enters a good home.

Along with Bones, four other dogs are now staying at the shelter awaiting adoption. Although the Collins are paid to provide Flamborough’s animal control services, the shelter itself receives no outside funding. The family is under no obligation to find adoptive homes for the animals.

“When you love animals, that’s just what you do,” Charmaine said. “How can you turn your back on them?”

A young female Rottweiler known as Pumpkin is another new addition to the shelter. When Rick first brought her home, Pumpkin was dangerously emaciated. On the ride back to the shelter, she vomited a large quantity of pumpkin, which may have been the only food source available. She was discovered by a homeowner in a shed on Westover Road.

On a typical week, Rick will find one or two lost or abandoned dogs on rural Flamborough roads. As Charmaine explained, when a dog is found sitting in the same location for several days, chances are its owner dropped it off with no intention of returning.

“Dogs who are lost keep moving,” Charmaine said. “Dogs who are abandoned just stay because they can’t find their direction.”

Earlier this year, Rick was called to pick up a female golden Labrador cross at the Flamborough Speedway. Nicknamed Old Yeller, the dog is friendly and follows them around the kennel. Rick believes the dog was a longtime family pet that was abandoned for some unknown reason.

The shelter currently has about 30 cats available for adoption. The rescued felines range from kittens to older adult cats. Families can adopt a kitten for a nominal fee of $35, which includes vaccinations, de-worming and a de-flea. Adult cats are spayed and neutered prior to adoption for a $100 fee.

All dogs are vaccinated, de-wormed and spayed or neutered before entering their permanent home. The kennel also offers a discount for boarding services for the life of the dog. A donation is required to adopt a dog, which helps defray shelter costs and medical expenses.

Bones should be available for adoption in a few weeks. He has already been vaccinated and de-wormed, but still requires neutering and blood work.

The Collins are currently looking for donations of time and supplies, such as cat litter and food, to help defray the shelter’s operating costs.

While Charmaine knows the shelter is helping to save animal’s lives, she also credits the animals for surviving against long odds. Bones is her prime example.

“They have to have the will to live, too and I think he does,” Charmaine said.

For more information on the shelter or to inquire about volunteering, visit www.aglensaxon.com or call 905-648-6955.