Another red light camera or two might be coming to a neighbourhood near you

News Nov 12, 2009 Ancaster News

Expect to see another red light camera or two in the city over the next few months.

The use of red light cameras at problem intersections started as a pilot project in Hamilton and five other municipalities in 2000. They became part of the Highway Traffic Act in 2004. In Hamilton, the program was expanded in 2007 and again earlier this year. Another intersection, possibly two, will be getting cameras soon, said Hart Solomon, the city's manager of traffic engineering and operations.

"This is likely to be the last expansion for a while," he said.

Right now cameras are set up at 14 intersection. Six have cameras permanently installed, while the original eight sites have four cameras rotating through them.

In the initial installations there were more housings than cameras. The cameras were rotated around the boxes, so motorists wouldn't know when a light was live or a dummy. They are still rotated, said Solomon, while the latter ones contain permanent cameras.

When the program started, there were about 250 right-angle collisions annually within intersections in the city. Since then, there has been a "significant decline" in offences and crashes, he said.

The cameras are triggered by vehicles entering the intersection once the light is red. Within three weeks, the registered owner of the vehicle gets a ticket for $180.

Solomon wouldn't discuss exact statistics, but said the number of tickets issued since its inception has gone down.

"We've seen a significant decline in the bad behaviour and that's what we want to see."

He estimated the number of violations has been reduced by up to 70 per cent at intersections where the cameras were first installed. The city doesn't like to disclose the location of the cameras, but they are all signed and not hard to find.

"We make a point of not advertising where they are because we are trying to leverage that into convincing those drivers who don't like to stop for red lights, that they should stop for all red lights."

Another red light camera or two might be coming to a neighbourhood near you

News Nov 12, 2009 Ancaster News

Expect to see another red light camera or two in the city over the next few months.

The use of red light cameras at problem intersections started as a pilot project in Hamilton and five other municipalities in 2000. They became part of the Highway Traffic Act in 2004. In Hamilton, the program was expanded in 2007 and again earlier this year. Another intersection, possibly two, will be getting cameras soon, said Hart Solomon, the city's manager of traffic engineering and operations.

"This is likely to be the last expansion for a while," he said.

Right now cameras are set up at 14 intersection. Six have cameras permanently installed, while the original eight sites have four cameras rotating through them.

In the initial installations there were more housings than cameras. The cameras were rotated around the boxes, so motorists wouldn't know when a light was live or a dummy. They are still rotated, said Solomon, while the latter ones contain permanent cameras.

When the program started, there were about 250 right-angle collisions annually within intersections in the city. Since then, there has been a "significant decline" in offences and crashes, he said.

The cameras are triggered by vehicles entering the intersection once the light is red. Within three weeks, the registered owner of the vehicle gets a ticket for $180.

Solomon wouldn't discuss exact statistics, but said the number of tickets issued since its inception has gone down.

"We've seen a significant decline in the bad behaviour and that's what we want to see."

He estimated the number of violations has been reduced by up to 70 per cent at intersections where the cameras were first installed. The city doesn't like to disclose the location of the cameras, but they are all signed and not hard to find.

"We make a point of not advertising where they are because we are trying to leverage that into convincing those drivers who don't like to stop for red lights, that they should stop for all red lights."

Another red light camera or two might be coming to a neighbourhood near you

News Nov 12, 2009 Ancaster News

Expect to see another red light camera or two in the city over the next few months.

The use of red light cameras at problem intersections started as a pilot project in Hamilton and five other municipalities in 2000. They became part of the Highway Traffic Act in 2004. In Hamilton, the program was expanded in 2007 and again earlier this year. Another intersection, possibly two, will be getting cameras soon, said Hart Solomon, the city's manager of traffic engineering and operations.

"This is likely to be the last expansion for a while," he said.

Right now cameras are set up at 14 intersection. Six have cameras permanently installed, while the original eight sites have four cameras rotating through them.

In the initial installations there were more housings than cameras. The cameras were rotated around the boxes, so motorists wouldn't know when a light was live or a dummy. They are still rotated, said Solomon, while the latter ones contain permanent cameras.

When the program started, there were about 250 right-angle collisions annually within intersections in the city. Since then, there has been a "significant decline" in offences and crashes, he said.

The cameras are triggered by vehicles entering the intersection once the light is red. Within three weeks, the registered owner of the vehicle gets a ticket for $180.

Solomon wouldn't discuss exact statistics, but said the number of tickets issued since its inception has gone down.

"We've seen a significant decline in the bad behaviour and that's what we want to see."

He estimated the number of violations has been reduced by up to 70 per cent at intersections where the cameras were first installed. The city doesn't like to disclose the location of the cameras, but they are all signed and not hard to find.

"We make a point of not advertising where they are because we are trying to leverage that into convincing those drivers who don't like to stop for red lights, that they should stop for all red lights."