Dads are important for today’s children

News Nov 12, 2009 Ancaster News

The room is starting to fill up with the tools required to raise a newborn.

There’s a crib, cute little mobile, car seat, a jumper, piles of baby clothing and a big stack of diapers. I picked up the little snowsuit the other night and marvelled at the prospect that in just over a month, a baby’s arms and legs will bring this article of clothing to life.

Many of the items were given to us by friends only too willing to clear out their basements of the stockpile of unused infant gear.

Lucky for us, most of the people we know have already had children. I guess there’s a few advantages to waiting so long to have a family.

The anticipation is starting to swell in my heart and mind. The days seem longer, as we push forward to the looming due date of Dec. 21.

So many thoughts go through my mind each day as I prepare to take on this role as father.

The role of a dad has changed dramatically from the days when I was born. Back then, dad was the bread winner and disciplinarian. He was the wallet and the rock.

But the modern-day father has evolved from the early stereotypes that defined the 19th and 20th centuries. Dads have been forced to adapt as society changed. In the 1960s, few women worked full-time professional jobs. Many moms stayed at home, raised the children and maintained the household.

That has all changed in the past 40 years, as women rightfully reclaimed their liberty to play a larger role in society and to make choices beyond the maternal role.

Moms are still moms, but many are working moms these days.

To compensate, dads have had to step in and become partners in child rearing, rather than just providers.

Today, many fathers play an increasing role in their children’s lives, and there is mounting evidence this involvement can have a profound effect in nurturing self-esteem, respect and intelligence.

The role of dad has prominence once again.

I am fortunate to have a very close bond with my father. It’s the type of relationship I hope to earn from my child, although I know it won’t happen without a dedicated investment of inner equity.

My dad is my greatest hero. I only hope I can achieve the same status with my child.

My greatest fear, however, is that I will leave my child abandoned while he/she is still at an early age.

While most couples decide to start a family while they are in their 20s or 30s, I start this journey as a 42-year-old man.

Realistically, my life is pretty much half over. This reality stimulates so many thoughts and questions in my mind.

When my child turns 20, I will be 62. When my child reaches 42, there’s a good chance I’ll be dead and buried. Will I be around to see any grandchildren? Maybe I should take better care of myself so I can live longer.

I have also read research that suggests children of older fathers have increased health risks, such as breast cancer, autism and schizophrenia.

A recent study indicates children who are fathered by older men tend to perform worse in intelligence tests than the children of younger dads. I think about these questions almost every day, and it frightens me. But it’s something I can’t change. All I can do is focus on being the best father I can be, and make the most of the time I will have with my child.

If I do it right, it won’t matter if I live to be 70 or 100. That’s because heroes live forever.

Dads are important for today’s children

News Nov 12, 2009 Ancaster News

The room is starting to fill up with the tools required to raise a newborn.

There’s a crib, cute little mobile, car seat, a jumper, piles of baby clothing and a big stack of diapers. I picked up the little snowsuit the other night and marvelled at the prospect that in just over a month, a baby’s arms and legs will bring this article of clothing to life.

Many of the items were given to us by friends only too willing to clear out their basements of the stockpile of unused infant gear.

Lucky for us, most of the people we know have already had children. I guess there’s a few advantages to waiting so long to have a family.

The anticipation is starting to swell in my heart and mind. The days seem longer, as we push forward to the looming due date of Dec. 21.

So many thoughts go through my mind each day as I prepare to take on this role as father.

The role of a dad has changed dramatically from the days when I was born. Back then, dad was the bread winner and disciplinarian. He was the wallet and the rock.

But the modern-day father has evolved from the early stereotypes that defined the 19th and 20th centuries. Dads have been forced to adapt as society changed. In the 1960s, few women worked full-time professional jobs. Many moms stayed at home, raised the children and maintained the household.

That has all changed in the past 40 years, as women rightfully reclaimed their liberty to play a larger role in society and to make choices beyond the maternal role.

Moms are still moms, but many are working moms these days.

To compensate, dads have had to step in and become partners in child rearing, rather than just providers.

Today, many fathers play an increasing role in their children’s lives, and there is mounting evidence this involvement can have a profound effect in nurturing self-esteem, respect and intelligence.

The role of dad has prominence once again.

I am fortunate to have a very close bond with my father. It’s the type of relationship I hope to earn from my child, although I know it won’t happen without a dedicated investment of inner equity.

My dad is my greatest hero. I only hope I can achieve the same status with my child.

My greatest fear, however, is that I will leave my child abandoned while he/she is still at an early age.

While most couples decide to start a family while they are in their 20s or 30s, I start this journey as a 42-year-old man.

Realistically, my life is pretty much half over. This reality stimulates so many thoughts and questions in my mind.

When my child turns 20, I will be 62. When my child reaches 42, there’s a good chance I’ll be dead and buried. Will I be around to see any grandchildren? Maybe I should take better care of myself so I can live longer.

I have also read research that suggests children of older fathers have increased health risks, such as breast cancer, autism and schizophrenia.

A recent study indicates children who are fathered by older men tend to perform worse in intelligence tests than the children of younger dads. I think about these questions almost every day, and it frightens me. But it’s something I can’t change. All I can do is focus on being the best father I can be, and make the most of the time I will have with my child.

If I do it right, it won’t matter if I live to be 70 or 100. That’s because heroes live forever.

Dads are important for today’s children

News Nov 12, 2009 Ancaster News

The room is starting to fill up with the tools required to raise a newborn.

There’s a crib, cute little mobile, car seat, a jumper, piles of baby clothing and a big stack of diapers. I picked up the little snowsuit the other night and marvelled at the prospect that in just over a month, a baby’s arms and legs will bring this article of clothing to life.

Many of the items were given to us by friends only too willing to clear out their basements of the stockpile of unused infant gear.

Lucky for us, most of the people we know have already had children. I guess there’s a few advantages to waiting so long to have a family.

The anticipation is starting to swell in my heart and mind. The days seem longer, as we push forward to the looming due date of Dec. 21.

So many thoughts go through my mind each day as I prepare to take on this role as father.

The role of a dad has changed dramatically from the days when I was born. Back then, dad was the bread winner and disciplinarian. He was the wallet and the rock.

But the modern-day father has evolved from the early stereotypes that defined the 19th and 20th centuries. Dads have been forced to adapt as society changed. In the 1960s, few women worked full-time professional jobs. Many moms stayed at home, raised the children and maintained the household.

That has all changed in the past 40 years, as women rightfully reclaimed their liberty to play a larger role in society and to make choices beyond the maternal role.

Moms are still moms, but many are working moms these days.

To compensate, dads have had to step in and become partners in child rearing, rather than just providers.

Today, many fathers play an increasing role in their children’s lives, and there is mounting evidence this involvement can have a profound effect in nurturing self-esteem, respect and intelligence.

The role of dad has prominence once again.

I am fortunate to have a very close bond with my father. It’s the type of relationship I hope to earn from my child, although I know it won’t happen without a dedicated investment of inner equity.

My dad is my greatest hero. I only hope I can achieve the same status with my child.

My greatest fear, however, is that I will leave my child abandoned while he/she is still at an early age.

While most couples decide to start a family while they are in their 20s or 30s, I start this journey as a 42-year-old man.

Realistically, my life is pretty much half over. This reality stimulates so many thoughts and questions in my mind.

When my child turns 20, I will be 62. When my child reaches 42, there’s a good chance I’ll be dead and buried. Will I be around to see any grandchildren? Maybe I should take better care of myself so I can live longer.

I have also read research that suggests children of older fathers have increased health risks, such as breast cancer, autism and schizophrenia.

A recent study indicates children who are fathered by older men tend to perform worse in intelligence tests than the children of younger dads. I think about these questions almost every day, and it frightens me. But it’s something I can’t change. All I can do is focus on being the best father I can be, and make the most of the time I will have with my child.

If I do it right, it won’t matter if I live to be 70 or 100. That’s because heroes live forever.