City urges chamber of commerce to walk the talk of summit action

News Nov 12, 2009 Ancaster News

The last two Hamilton Economic Summits have identified a litany of the city’s problems. Now councillors want some action.

Former Hamilton Chamber of Commerce president Tyler McLeod pointed out during a presentation to politicians this week the successes the first two summits have produced, including creating a blueprint for how the city can improve its economic strategy. The chamber, which sponsors the community event attended by about 150 business and community leaders, has identified five priorities the city should take action on, including crafting an environment for entrepreneurship, creating private sector jobs and attracting young people to the area.

But for some councillors, next year’s conference at the Hamilton Convention Centre in May must go beyond simply explaining the city’s difficulties. Councillor Chad Collins said the summary document from the conference lists over 100 issues to address.

“How do we focus on all of them?” he asked.

Mayor Fred Eisenberger said the summits have “provided great acclamation of what the city and economic development department is doing.”

“But the focus is what can the chamber members do? What is the next step for the chamber?” he said.

The mayor said the next summit has to provide “action items,” and urged chamber members who are business people to drive that agenda.

“How can they add to the prosperity?” said Eisenberger.

McLeod, who was a bit frustrated after the council’s questioning, said after the meeting that the next summit will concentrate on crafting an action agenda that will be “very focused and achievable.”

He also had to defend the chamber’s interest in hosting the summit. Last year the chamber and councillors became embroiled in a controversy when chamber officials offered politicians discounted tickets to the event at the Crowne Plaza Hotel. Some councillors took the reduced tickets, while others rejected the idea, arguing the chamber was nothing more than another lobby group trying to influence politicians.

McLeod said if, for example, the Victorian Order of Nurses were organizing the event, the final recommendations from the summit would still be the same.

“We tried to accommodate all councillors,” said McLeod.

John Dolbec, executive director of the Hamilton Chamber of Commerce, said later both summits have found Hamilton has all the ingredients to succeed in the global marketplace. The problem has been to find out how and who will “connect the dots” to achieve their goals.

He also pointed out that contrary to some councillors’ beliefs, the chamber has established a benchmarking program to measure the success of the summit’s recommendations. Next year’s summit will be co-hosted by Mohawk president Rob MacIsaac and an as-yet-identified person.

City urges chamber of commerce to walk the talk of summit action

News Nov 12, 2009 Ancaster News

The last two Hamilton Economic Summits have identified a litany of the city’s problems. Now councillors want some action.

Former Hamilton Chamber of Commerce president Tyler McLeod pointed out during a presentation to politicians this week the successes the first two summits have produced, including creating a blueprint for how the city can improve its economic strategy. The chamber, which sponsors the community event attended by about 150 business and community leaders, has identified five priorities the city should take action on, including crafting an environment for entrepreneurship, creating private sector jobs and attracting young people to the area.

But for some councillors, next year’s conference at the Hamilton Convention Centre in May must go beyond simply explaining the city’s difficulties. Councillor Chad Collins said the summary document from the conference lists over 100 issues to address.

“How do we focus on all of them?” he asked.

Mayor Fred Eisenberger said the summits have “provided great acclamation of what the city and economic development department is doing.”

“But the focus is what can the chamber members do? What is the next step for the chamber?” he said.

The mayor said the next summit has to provide “action items,” and urged chamber members who are business people to drive that agenda.

“How can they add to the prosperity?” said Eisenberger.

McLeod, who was a bit frustrated after the council’s questioning, said after the meeting that the next summit will concentrate on crafting an action agenda that will be “very focused and achievable.”

He also had to defend the chamber’s interest in hosting the summit. Last year the chamber and councillors became embroiled in a controversy when chamber officials offered politicians discounted tickets to the event at the Crowne Plaza Hotel. Some councillors took the reduced tickets, while others rejected the idea, arguing the chamber was nothing more than another lobby group trying to influence politicians.

McLeod said if, for example, the Victorian Order of Nurses were organizing the event, the final recommendations from the summit would still be the same.

“We tried to accommodate all councillors,” said McLeod.

John Dolbec, executive director of the Hamilton Chamber of Commerce, said later both summits have found Hamilton has all the ingredients to succeed in the global marketplace. The problem has been to find out how and who will “connect the dots” to achieve their goals.

He also pointed out that contrary to some councillors’ beliefs, the chamber has established a benchmarking program to measure the success of the summit’s recommendations. Next year’s summit will be co-hosted by Mohawk president Rob MacIsaac and an as-yet-identified person.

City urges chamber of commerce to walk the talk of summit action

News Nov 12, 2009 Ancaster News

The last two Hamilton Economic Summits have identified a litany of the city’s problems. Now councillors want some action.

Former Hamilton Chamber of Commerce president Tyler McLeod pointed out during a presentation to politicians this week the successes the first two summits have produced, including creating a blueprint for how the city can improve its economic strategy. The chamber, which sponsors the community event attended by about 150 business and community leaders, has identified five priorities the city should take action on, including crafting an environment for entrepreneurship, creating private sector jobs and attracting young people to the area.

But for some councillors, next year’s conference at the Hamilton Convention Centre in May must go beyond simply explaining the city’s difficulties. Councillor Chad Collins said the summary document from the conference lists over 100 issues to address.

“How do we focus on all of them?” he asked.

Mayor Fred Eisenberger said the summits have “provided great acclamation of what the city and economic development department is doing.”

“But the focus is what can the chamber members do? What is the next step for the chamber?” he said.

The mayor said the next summit has to provide “action items,” and urged chamber members who are business people to drive that agenda.

“How can they add to the prosperity?” said Eisenberger.

McLeod, who was a bit frustrated after the council’s questioning, said after the meeting that the next summit will concentrate on crafting an action agenda that will be “very focused and achievable.”

He also had to defend the chamber’s interest in hosting the summit. Last year the chamber and councillors became embroiled in a controversy when chamber officials offered politicians discounted tickets to the event at the Crowne Plaza Hotel. Some councillors took the reduced tickets, while others rejected the idea, arguing the chamber was nothing more than another lobby group trying to influence politicians.

McLeod said if, for example, the Victorian Order of Nurses were organizing the event, the final recommendations from the summit would still be the same.

“We tried to accommodate all councillors,” said McLeod.

John Dolbec, executive director of the Hamilton Chamber of Commerce, said later both summits have found Hamilton has all the ingredients to succeed in the global marketplace. The problem has been to find out how and who will “connect the dots” to achieve their goals.

He also pointed out that contrary to some councillors’ beliefs, the chamber has established a benchmarking program to measure the success of the summit’s recommendations. Next year’s summit will be co-hosted by Mohawk president Rob MacIsaac and an as-yet-identified person.