Remember those who gave their tomorrows for sake of our todays

News Nov 12, 2009 Ancaster News

Seven score and six years ago, one of America’s greatest presidents delivered what is often considered one of the world’s great political speeches.

Some 160,000 soldiers had clashed beside a community of fewer than 2,500 souls. After three days of fighting, 7,500 soldiers lay dead –three corpses for every townsperson.

Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address, given to dedicate the battlefield as burial ground, is fewer than a dozen sentences long. Near the middle comes a remarkable sentence: In the first clause he gets it totally wrong; in the second he speaks a truth so profound that it resonates for us still.

“The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here,” he begins — little imagining that these few words are going to be among one of the most quoted speeches of all time.

“The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here.”

How true that was. How true it remains. True of any battlefield, on any side, in any war.

Almost 65,000 Canadian soldiers gave what Lincoln called “the last full measure of devotion” during the First World War. Far too many.

Some 45,000 Canadian soldiers gave their lives during the Second World War. Far too many.

Five hundred and sixteen Canadians made the ultimate sacrifice in Korea. Far too many.

More than 130 brave Canadians have not come home from Afghanistan. Far too many.

And so another Remembrance Day has passed as thousands of Canadian troops continue to serve in Afghanistan.

One who did return is Captain Diane Kilby of Waterdown, now using her experience and training to advise the Canadian government.

Another is Corporal Chris Klodt of Westover, who I’ve been privileged to meet. A bullet to the neck crushed Chris’ spine but it has slowed him down remarkably little.

Or Master Corporal Dan Pegg, who came back to Flamborough in June after seven months riding shotgun on supply convoys with the Royal Hamilton Light Infantry.

I haven’t met Pegg, though from newspaper accounts I’ve read, I’d be proud to do so.

He told the Hamilton Spectator he was glad to have gone because, “I wanted to serve Canada, we do good things. We try to give a little piece of what we’ve got to somebody who doesn’t have it.”

Thank God they came back. May we all pray, in our own ways, for the time when all our troops return, a time when none need risk “the last full measure of devotion.”

Meanwhile, let’s remember with gratitude those who gave all of their tomorrows for the sake of our todays. A moment of remembrance is the least that we owe.

Remember those who gave their tomorrows for sake of our todays

News Nov 12, 2009 Ancaster News

Seven score and six years ago, one of America’s greatest presidents delivered what is often considered one of the world’s great political speeches.

Some 160,000 soldiers had clashed beside a community of fewer than 2,500 souls. After three days of fighting, 7,500 soldiers lay dead –three corpses for every townsperson.

Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address, given to dedicate the battlefield as burial ground, is fewer than a dozen sentences long. Near the middle comes a remarkable sentence: In the first clause he gets it totally wrong; in the second he speaks a truth so profound that it resonates for us still.

“The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here,” he begins — little imagining that these few words are going to be among one of the most quoted speeches of all time.

“The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here.”

How true that was. How true it remains. True of any battlefield, on any side, in any war.

Almost 65,000 Canadian soldiers gave what Lincoln called “the last full measure of devotion” during the First World War. Far too many.

Some 45,000 Canadian soldiers gave their lives during the Second World War. Far too many.

Five hundred and sixteen Canadians made the ultimate sacrifice in Korea. Far too many.

More than 130 brave Canadians have not come home from Afghanistan. Far too many.

And so another Remembrance Day has passed as thousands of Canadian troops continue to serve in Afghanistan.

One who did return is Captain Diane Kilby of Waterdown, now using her experience and training to advise the Canadian government.

Another is Corporal Chris Klodt of Westover, who I’ve been privileged to meet. A bullet to the neck crushed Chris’ spine but it has slowed him down remarkably little.

Or Master Corporal Dan Pegg, who came back to Flamborough in June after seven months riding shotgun on supply convoys with the Royal Hamilton Light Infantry.

I haven’t met Pegg, though from newspaper accounts I’ve read, I’d be proud to do so.

He told the Hamilton Spectator he was glad to have gone because, “I wanted to serve Canada, we do good things. We try to give a little piece of what we’ve got to somebody who doesn’t have it.”

Thank God they came back. May we all pray, in our own ways, for the time when all our troops return, a time when none need risk “the last full measure of devotion.”

Meanwhile, let’s remember with gratitude those who gave all of their tomorrows for the sake of our todays. A moment of remembrance is the least that we owe.

Remember those who gave their tomorrows for sake of our todays

News Nov 12, 2009 Ancaster News

Seven score and six years ago, one of America’s greatest presidents delivered what is often considered one of the world’s great political speeches.

Some 160,000 soldiers had clashed beside a community of fewer than 2,500 souls. After three days of fighting, 7,500 soldiers lay dead –three corpses for every townsperson.

Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address, given to dedicate the battlefield as burial ground, is fewer than a dozen sentences long. Near the middle comes a remarkable sentence: In the first clause he gets it totally wrong; in the second he speaks a truth so profound that it resonates for us still.

“The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here,” he begins — little imagining that these few words are going to be among one of the most quoted speeches of all time.

“The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here.”

How true that was. How true it remains. True of any battlefield, on any side, in any war.

Almost 65,000 Canadian soldiers gave what Lincoln called “the last full measure of devotion” during the First World War. Far too many.

Some 45,000 Canadian soldiers gave their lives during the Second World War. Far too many.

Five hundred and sixteen Canadians made the ultimate sacrifice in Korea. Far too many.

More than 130 brave Canadians have not come home from Afghanistan. Far too many.

And so another Remembrance Day has passed as thousands of Canadian troops continue to serve in Afghanistan.

One who did return is Captain Diane Kilby of Waterdown, now using her experience and training to advise the Canadian government.

Another is Corporal Chris Klodt of Westover, who I’ve been privileged to meet. A bullet to the neck crushed Chris’ spine but it has slowed him down remarkably little.

Or Master Corporal Dan Pegg, who came back to Flamborough in June after seven months riding shotgun on supply convoys with the Royal Hamilton Light Infantry.

I haven’t met Pegg, though from newspaper accounts I’ve read, I’d be proud to do so.

He told the Hamilton Spectator he was glad to have gone because, “I wanted to serve Canada, we do good things. We try to give a little piece of what we’ve got to somebody who doesn’t have it.”

Thank God they came back. May we all pray, in our own ways, for the time when all our troops return, a time when none need risk “the last full measure of devotion.”

Meanwhile, let’s remember with gratitude those who gave all of their tomorrows for the sake of our todays. A moment of remembrance is the least that we owe.