Pan Am-demonium

News Nov 07, 2009 Ancaster News

For Hamilton, the third time was the charm.After suffering through two dejected defeats to host the Commonwealth Games, politicians, business representatives, city officials and politicians were hugging each other after learning the city, along with Toronto and 12 other municipalities in the Golden Horseshoe will host the 2015 Pan Am Games.“It’s a win,” said David Adames, executive director of Tourism Hamilton, who was part of the organizations that endured the 2010 and 2014 Commonwealth Games bid losses.Mayor Fred Eisenberger couldn’t contain himself, hugging councillors, friends, his wife Diane, and anybody else that was in his reach.“I just feel relieved, excited and so happy for Hamilton,” said Eisenberger. “We have been down this road before. We haven’t been successful. All that experience has come to bear on this bid. We deserve the win.“I’m a lot happy,” continued an ebullient mayor. “This is Fred excited. I’m not all that dry all the time.”Eisenberger’s enthusiasm was infectious as he gathered his councillors, and area MPPs to pop some Henkel champion for the occasion, to a round of glorious applause from well-wishers.He was surrounded by his wife Diane, Liberal MPPs Sophia Aggelonitis, Ted McMeekin, Conservative MP David Sweet, and councillors Bob Bratina, Tom Jackson, Lloyd Ferguson, Maria Person, Scott Duvall, Terry Whitehead, Robert Pasuta, and Pat Dillon, business manager of the Building and Construction Trades Council of Ontario. Looking on with grins from ear to ear were Hamilton businessmen Tom Weisz, Ron Foxcroft, and John Dolbec from the Hamilton Chamber of Commerce.“For Hamilton and Hamiltonians, yes this was risky, yes we put some money on the line but the benefits that will come out of this will make our city so much better. It is just a super, super win,” said Eisenberger.The announcement means that for Hamilton, it will get a cash injection of about $170 million for needed sports facilities, including a long-awaited new 15,000-seat stadium that can be expanded to accommodate the Hamilton Tiger-Cats, a velodrome, an aquatics centre at McMaster University and upgrades to Copps Coliseum. The city will host track, soccer at the Ron Joyce Stadium at McMaster, swimming and volleyball at Copps. Hamilton is expected to contribute about $60 million as its share of the cost to host what is projected to be a $1.43 billion event. Both the provincial and federal governments are contributing $500 million, with the province guaranteeing to cover any cost overruns.“For $60 million we will get about $300 million worth in stadium, velodrome and pool work, as well as it will inspire the rapid transit plans, and of course they will look at Hamilton as a whole new investment opportunity,” said Eisenberger.Jackson joined other politicians in pumping fists and backslapping friends in the glow of the announcement. But he also praised the late Dr. Gene Sutton, who worked tirelessly to get the games to the city. She recently passed away earlier this year.“I know she is smiling down from heaven,” he said. “This will be her legacy, in memory of Gene.”“This puts Hamilton not only on the map, but it puts the city’s image out across the world,” said Whitehead.McMeekin joined in the celebrations, saying the games will provide a lasting accomplishment for the city’s children and grandchildren.“We deserved this,” he said “We are all feeling like champions.”On this night at least, the congratulations became non-political with NDP MP Paul Miller saying the announcement will mean jobs to the city, and a new image for Hamilton.“This is a mental boost for Hamilton,” he said. “It’s a big day for Hamilton.”The 2015 Pan Am Games, which brings together athletes from North and South America, and the Caribbean, will be the first world-class event the city has hosted since the 1930 Empire Games, which were created by a Hamiltonian. The event, which became the Commonwealth Games, spurred the construction of Ivor Wynne Stadium and Jimmy Thompson Pool.City officials were preparing for a celebration at the Canadian Marine Discovery Centre, with the announcement from Mexico expected at about 6 p.m. But to the surprise of nearly everyone, the decision was made shortly after 4:30 p.m. with the facility half full of people. Politicians and other officials were ambling into the centre to a crowd of people whooping it up.Mr. Dillon was driving to the centre when he got a call from a friend saying Hamilton had won.“I didn’t know what to say. Was it true, I asked, and it was,” he said.The Pan American Sports Organization needed only one ballot to secure the Golden Horseshoe’s victory. The final tally was Toronto 33, Lima, Peru, 11, and Bogota, Columbia 7.“We will party tonight, but tomorrow we get down to business,” said Eisenberger after the announcement.

Pan Am-demonium

News Nov 07, 2009 Ancaster News

For Hamilton, the third time was the charm.After suffering through two dejected defeats to host the Commonwealth Games, politicians, business representatives, city officials and politicians were hugging each other after learning the city, along with Toronto and 12 other municipalities in the Golden Horseshoe will host the 2015 Pan Am Games.“It’s a win,” said David Adames, executive director of Tourism Hamilton, who was part of the organizations that endured the 2010 and 2014 Commonwealth Games bid losses.Mayor Fred Eisenberger couldn’t contain himself, hugging councillors, friends, his wife Diane, and anybody else that was in his reach.“I just feel relieved, excited and so happy for Hamilton,” said Eisenberger. “We have been down this road before. We haven’t been successful. All that experience has come to bear on this bid. We deserve the win.“I’m a lot happy,” continued an ebullient mayor. “This is Fred excited. I’m not all that dry all the time.”Eisenberger’s enthusiasm was infectious as he gathered his councillors, and area MPPs to pop some Henkel champion for the occasion, to a round of glorious applause from well-wishers.He was surrounded by his wife Diane, Liberal MPPs Sophia Aggelonitis, Ted McMeekin, Conservative MP David Sweet, and councillors Bob Bratina, Tom Jackson, Lloyd Ferguson, Maria Person, Scott Duvall, Terry Whitehead, Robert Pasuta, and Pat Dillon, business manager of the Building and Construction Trades Council of Ontario. Looking on with grins from ear to ear were Hamilton businessmen Tom Weisz, Ron Foxcroft, and John Dolbec from the Hamilton Chamber of Commerce.“For Hamilton and Hamiltonians, yes this was risky, yes we put some money on the line but the benefits that will come out of this will make our city so much better. It is just a super, super win,” said Eisenberger.The announcement means that for Hamilton, it will get a cash injection of about $170 million for needed sports facilities, including a long-awaited new 15,000-seat stadium that can be expanded to accommodate the Hamilton Tiger-Cats, a velodrome, an aquatics centre at McMaster University and upgrades to Copps Coliseum. The city will host track, soccer at the Ron Joyce Stadium at McMaster, swimming and volleyball at Copps. Hamilton is expected to contribute about $60 million as its share of the cost to host what is projected to be a $1.43 billion event. Both the provincial and federal governments are contributing $500 million, with the province guaranteeing to cover any cost overruns.“For $60 million we will get about $300 million worth in stadium, velodrome and pool work, as well as it will inspire the rapid transit plans, and of course they will look at Hamilton as a whole new investment opportunity,” said Eisenberger.Jackson joined other politicians in pumping fists and backslapping friends in the glow of the announcement. But he also praised the late Dr. Gene Sutton, who worked tirelessly to get the games to the city. She recently passed away earlier this year.“I know she is smiling down from heaven,” he said. “This will be her legacy, in memory of Gene.”“This puts Hamilton not only on the map, but it puts the city’s image out across the world,” said Whitehead.McMeekin joined in the celebrations, saying the games will provide a lasting accomplishment for the city’s children and grandchildren.“We deserved this,” he said “We are all feeling like champions.”On this night at least, the congratulations became non-political with NDP MP Paul Miller saying the announcement will mean jobs to the city, and a new image for Hamilton.“This is a mental boost for Hamilton,” he said. “It’s a big day for Hamilton.”The 2015 Pan Am Games, which brings together athletes from North and South America, and the Caribbean, will be the first world-class event the city has hosted since the 1930 Empire Games, which were created by a Hamiltonian. The event, which became the Commonwealth Games, spurred the construction of Ivor Wynne Stadium and Jimmy Thompson Pool.City officials were preparing for a celebration at the Canadian Marine Discovery Centre, with the announcement from Mexico expected at about 6 p.m. But to the surprise of nearly everyone, the decision was made shortly after 4:30 p.m. with the facility half full of people. Politicians and other officials were ambling into the centre to a crowd of people whooping it up.Mr. Dillon was driving to the centre when he got a call from a friend saying Hamilton had won.“I didn’t know what to say. Was it true, I asked, and it was,” he said.The Pan American Sports Organization needed only one ballot to secure the Golden Horseshoe’s victory. The final tally was Toronto 33, Lima, Peru, 11, and Bogota, Columbia 7.“We will party tonight, but tomorrow we get down to business,” said Eisenberger after the announcement.

Pan Am-demonium

News Nov 07, 2009 Ancaster News

For Hamilton, the third time was the charm.After suffering through two dejected defeats to host the Commonwealth Games, politicians, business representatives, city officials and politicians were hugging each other after learning the city, along with Toronto and 12 other municipalities in the Golden Horseshoe will host the 2015 Pan Am Games.“It’s a win,” said David Adames, executive director of Tourism Hamilton, who was part of the organizations that endured the 2010 and 2014 Commonwealth Games bid losses.Mayor Fred Eisenberger couldn’t contain himself, hugging councillors, friends, his wife Diane, and anybody else that was in his reach.“I just feel relieved, excited and so happy for Hamilton,” said Eisenberger. “We have been down this road before. We haven’t been successful. All that experience has come to bear on this bid. We deserve the win.“I’m a lot happy,” continued an ebullient mayor. “This is Fred excited. I’m not all that dry all the time.”Eisenberger’s enthusiasm was infectious as he gathered his councillors, and area MPPs to pop some Henkel champion for the occasion, to a round of glorious applause from well-wishers.He was surrounded by his wife Diane, Liberal MPPs Sophia Aggelonitis, Ted McMeekin, Conservative MP David Sweet, and councillors Bob Bratina, Tom Jackson, Lloyd Ferguson, Maria Person, Scott Duvall, Terry Whitehead, Robert Pasuta, and Pat Dillon, business manager of the Building and Construction Trades Council of Ontario. Looking on with grins from ear to ear were Hamilton businessmen Tom Weisz, Ron Foxcroft, and John Dolbec from the Hamilton Chamber of Commerce.“For Hamilton and Hamiltonians, yes this was risky, yes we put some money on the line but the benefits that will come out of this will make our city so much better. It is just a super, super win,” said Eisenberger.The announcement means that for Hamilton, it will get a cash injection of about $170 million for needed sports facilities, including a long-awaited new 15,000-seat stadium that can be expanded to accommodate the Hamilton Tiger-Cats, a velodrome, an aquatics centre at McMaster University and upgrades to Copps Coliseum. The city will host track, soccer at the Ron Joyce Stadium at McMaster, swimming and volleyball at Copps. Hamilton is expected to contribute about $60 million as its share of the cost to host what is projected to be a $1.43 billion event. Both the provincial and federal governments are contributing $500 million, with the province guaranteeing to cover any cost overruns.“For $60 million we will get about $300 million worth in stadium, velodrome and pool work, as well as it will inspire the rapid transit plans, and of course they will look at Hamilton as a whole new investment opportunity,” said Eisenberger.Jackson joined other politicians in pumping fists and backslapping friends in the glow of the announcement. But he also praised the late Dr. Gene Sutton, who worked tirelessly to get the games to the city. She recently passed away earlier this year.“I know she is smiling down from heaven,” he said. “This will be her legacy, in memory of Gene.”“This puts Hamilton not only on the map, but it puts the city’s image out across the world,” said Whitehead.McMeekin joined in the celebrations, saying the games will provide a lasting accomplishment for the city’s children and grandchildren.“We deserved this,” he said “We are all feeling like champions.”On this night at least, the congratulations became non-political with NDP MP Paul Miller saying the announcement will mean jobs to the city, and a new image for Hamilton.“This is a mental boost for Hamilton,” he said. “It’s a big day for Hamilton.”The 2015 Pan Am Games, which brings together athletes from North and South America, and the Caribbean, will be the first world-class event the city has hosted since the 1930 Empire Games, which were created by a Hamiltonian. The event, which became the Commonwealth Games, spurred the construction of Ivor Wynne Stadium and Jimmy Thompson Pool.City officials were preparing for a celebration at the Canadian Marine Discovery Centre, with the announcement from Mexico expected at about 6 p.m. But to the surprise of nearly everyone, the decision was made shortly after 4:30 p.m. with the facility half full of people. Politicians and other officials were ambling into the centre to a crowd of people whooping it up.Mr. Dillon was driving to the centre when he got a call from a friend saying Hamilton had won.“I didn’t know what to say. Was it true, I asked, and it was,” he said.The Pan American Sports Organization needed only one ballot to secure the Golden Horseshoe’s victory. The final tally was Toronto 33, Lima, Peru, 11, and Bogota, Columbia 7.“We will party tonight, but tomorrow we get down to business,” said Eisenberger after the announcement.