City’s waste goals tossed into dump

News Nov 06, 2009 Ancaster News

Hamilton’s waste diversion goal has fallen far short of its long-anticipated 65 per cent by 2011, acknowledge waste management officials.

Under Hamilton’s more educational and soft-selling waste programs systematically introduced over the last eight years, Beth Goodger, general manager of waste management, said Hamilton’s diversion goal is projected to be about 47 per cent, with 50 per cent diversion rate for residents by 2011.

Currently, the city’s diversion rate is expected to be 42 per cent overall by the end of 2009, and 47 per cent for residents.

“We have done a really good job,” said Ms. Goodger. “We have done the educational approach because we want people to understand. But we need help from other levels of government.”

Hamilton councillors have been reluctant to take a more aggressive approach to waste diversion, including bag tags, but politicians have agreed with waste management officials over the years to the green cart program, building a materials recycling facility and a composting facility.

Ms. Goodger said provincial and federal governments should be encouraged to start enforcing tougher packaging regulations, as well as imposing stricter regulations for commercial and industrial businesses to divert their waste to assist municipalities in reaching their diversion goals.

In 2001, Hamilton’s 25-year solid waste master plan recommended a 65 per cent diversion rate by 2008. In 2007, waste management officials revealed the city wouldn’t reach the goal, and pushed back the timeline to 2011.

Toronto recently revealed its 2009 waste diversion goal was only 46 per cent after establishing in 2001 a 100 per cent diversion rate by 2010. Toronto officials lowered the goal to 70 per cent by 2010.

Hamilton’s aggressive diversion rate in 2001 was an attempt to extend the life of the city’s only landfill site in Glanbrook past 2020.

In an effort to reach the 47 per cent diversion rate, waste management officials proposed a series of “relatively easy” programs to meet the new goals, including recycling street sweepings, drywall diversion, improving the city’s green cart diversion program for commercial businesses, reducing disposable diapers, and beefing up the city’s residential enforcement.

The total estimated tonnes of waste diverted if all program would be introduced is about 23,000.

Members of the public works department this week approved the waste material proposals, which will not cost any extra money. It will mean hiring a full-time employee for enforcement.

The additional enforcement, said Ms. Goodger, will focus on curbside and multifamily residences not participating in the any diversion goals. The city next April is scheduled to adopt the one container limit. About 85 per cent of Hamilton residents already put out one container for pick up, said Pat Parker, manager of solid waste planning.

But Ms. Goodger said any proposals to increase fees, or impose bag tags on residential waste containers won’t be introduced by waste management.

“I am extremely relieved,” said Mountain Councillor Tom Jackson.

This year the city rolled out its diversion programs for multi-residential units, but so far the numbers of units participating is disappointing, said Ms. Goodger. About 71 per cent of Hamilton’s multi-residential units are participating, said Ms. Parker.

City’s waste goals tossed into dump

News Nov 06, 2009 Ancaster News

Hamilton’s waste diversion goal has fallen far short of its long-anticipated 65 per cent by 2011, acknowledge waste management officials.

Under Hamilton’s more educational and soft-selling waste programs systematically introduced over the last eight years, Beth Goodger, general manager of waste management, said Hamilton’s diversion goal is projected to be about 47 per cent, with 50 per cent diversion rate for residents by 2011.

Currently, the city’s diversion rate is expected to be 42 per cent overall by the end of 2009, and 47 per cent for residents.

“We have done a really good job,” said Ms. Goodger. “We have done the educational approach because we want people to understand. But we need help from other levels of government.”

Hamilton councillors have been reluctant to take a more aggressive approach to waste diversion, including bag tags, but politicians have agreed with waste management officials over the years to the green cart program, building a materials recycling facility and a composting facility.

Ms. Goodger said provincial and federal governments should be encouraged to start enforcing tougher packaging regulations, as well as imposing stricter regulations for commercial and industrial businesses to divert their waste to assist municipalities in reaching their diversion goals.

In 2001, Hamilton’s 25-year solid waste master plan recommended a 65 per cent diversion rate by 2008. In 2007, waste management officials revealed the city wouldn’t reach the goal, and pushed back the timeline to 2011.

Toronto recently revealed its 2009 waste diversion goal was only 46 per cent after establishing in 2001 a 100 per cent diversion rate by 2010. Toronto officials lowered the goal to 70 per cent by 2010.

Hamilton’s aggressive diversion rate in 2001 was an attempt to extend the life of the city’s only landfill site in Glanbrook past 2020.

In an effort to reach the 47 per cent diversion rate, waste management officials proposed a series of “relatively easy” programs to meet the new goals, including recycling street sweepings, drywall diversion, improving the city’s green cart diversion program for commercial businesses, reducing disposable diapers, and beefing up the city’s residential enforcement.

The total estimated tonnes of waste diverted if all program would be introduced is about 23,000.

Members of the public works department this week approved the waste material proposals, which will not cost any extra money. It will mean hiring a full-time employee for enforcement.

The additional enforcement, said Ms. Goodger, will focus on curbside and multifamily residences not participating in the any diversion goals. The city next April is scheduled to adopt the one container limit. About 85 per cent of Hamilton residents already put out one container for pick up, said Pat Parker, manager of solid waste planning.

But Ms. Goodger said any proposals to increase fees, or impose bag tags on residential waste containers won’t be introduced by waste management.

“I am extremely relieved,” said Mountain Councillor Tom Jackson.

This year the city rolled out its diversion programs for multi-residential units, but so far the numbers of units participating is disappointing, said Ms. Goodger. About 71 per cent of Hamilton’s multi-residential units are participating, said Ms. Parker.

City’s waste goals tossed into dump

News Nov 06, 2009 Ancaster News

Hamilton’s waste diversion goal has fallen far short of its long-anticipated 65 per cent by 2011, acknowledge waste management officials.

Under Hamilton’s more educational and soft-selling waste programs systematically introduced over the last eight years, Beth Goodger, general manager of waste management, said Hamilton’s diversion goal is projected to be about 47 per cent, with 50 per cent diversion rate for residents by 2011.

Currently, the city’s diversion rate is expected to be 42 per cent overall by the end of 2009, and 47 per cent for residents.

“We have done a really good job,” said Ms. Goodger. “We have done the educational approach because we want people to understand. But we need help from other levels of government.”

Hamilton councillors have been reluctant to take a more aggressive approach to waste diversion, including bag tags, but politicians have agreed with waste management officials over the years to the green cart program, building a materials recycling facility and a composting facility.

Ms. Goodger said provincial and federal governments should be encouraged to start enforcing tougher packaging regulations, as well as imposing stricter regulations for commercial and industrial businesses to divert their waste to assist municipalities in reaching their diversion goals.

In 2001, Hamilton’s 25-year solid waste master plan recommended a 65 per cent diversion rate by 2008. In 2007, waste management officials revealed the city wouldn’t reach the goal, and pushed back the timeline to 2011.

Toronto recently revealed its 2009 waste diversion goal was only 46 per cent after establishing in 2001 a 100 per cent diversion rate by 2010. Toronto officials lowered the goal to 70 per cent by 2010.

Hamilton’s aggressive diversion rate in 2001 was an attempt to extend the life of the city’s only landfill site in Glanbrook past 2020.

In an effort to reach the 47 per cent diversion rate, waste management officials proposed a series of “relatively easy” programs to meet the new goals, including recycling street sweepings, drywall diversion, improving the city’s green cart diversion program for commercial businesses, reducing disposable diapers, and beefing up the city’s residential enforcement.

The total estimated tonnes of waste diverted if all program would be introduced is about 23,000.

Members of the public works department this week approved the waste material proposals, which will not cost any extra money. It will mean hiring a full-time employee for enforcement.

The additional enforcement, said Ms. Goodger, will focus on curbside and multifamily residences not participating in the any diversion goals. The city next April is scheduled to adopt the one container limit. About 85 per cent of Hamilton residents already put out one container for pick up, said Pat Parker, manager of solid waste planning.

But Ms. Goodger said any proposals to increase fees, or impose bag tags on residential waste containers won’t be introduced by waste management.

“I am extremely relieved,” said Mountain Councillor Tom Jackson.

This year the city rolled out its diversion programs for multi-residential units, but so far the numbers of units participating is disappointing, said Ms. Goodger. About 71 per cent of Hamilton’s multi-residential units are participating, said Ms. Parker.