Painters and Potters combine for classy event at community centre this weekend

News Nov 06, 2009 Ancaster News

Did the hobgoblins find your door, Faithful Reader? Not as many came to my door as usual. I distributed candies, wrapped in papers this year, to friends and casual acquaintances for most for the remainder of the week. As always, I wore my Viking helmet at the door. As usual it got little reaction from the costumed visitors. Their adult guardians gave me a smile.

That is the charm of small children. If I had painted my face green and worn a tail, I would have been quite acceptable. As long as I smiled and a parent or older sibling was in charge, the order of the day was to get candies into their bag and remember to say “Thank you.” This year to my delight, some of the original Halloween visitors returned with their children. An indication that I have grown roots in Dundas.

This is a week of long days and nights, F. R. I am involved with the Hamilton and Region Potters’ Guild sale Friday to Sunday as the Dundas community centre as always. This year the Carnegie Gallery has an exhibition Painters and Potters opening on Friday evening.

Beginning with the invitation’s design, this is a classy event. Painter members invited potter members to work with them. I was very pleased to be invited by Lorne Toews, painter and art teacher at Ontario College of Art to be his model/partner. Lorne came to my studio and took numerous photos of me. I gave him an unfired pitcher to decorate. It came as no surprise that he was a trifle intimidated to paint on a surface that was not flat, smooth, and forgiving. A pitcher picture.

He went home and painted a breathtaking, noble portrait of a woman who somewhat resembles me. She has something of the commanding presence of the Queen’s famous portrait. It goes far beyond my photograph. She is the sort of woman my mother always wanted me to be.

This exhibition has all the makings of one of the most memorable of the gallery’s finest. It’s a tribute to the folks who are devoted to continuing the founders’ high standards as we approach the landmark anniversary next year.

The Potters’ Guild also has an outstanding history. I have been a member since 1980. Not an original member. There are only a few left, alas. The HPG has evolved, carefully nurtured, from a small group of local potters to a membership that spans Southern Ontario. It is not the only guild, F. R. Since I began, as my mother remarked, mucking around in that stuff, the community colleges, Burlington Art Centre, Dundas Valley School of Art to name only a few of the local centres, have encouraged and broadened the arts and crafts. When I began pottery studies there were two or three books. The HPG has an entire lending library. I built my first humble kiln. Those were certainly the ‘horse and buggy’ days of our craft.

I delight in the displays of work at the semi-annual HPG sales. Many years ago I wrote an article for a ceramics magazine and the editor chose an adaptation from one sentence for the title. “The day of the good brown pot is over.” There are young potters who have no idea what that means!

On the flip side of that, we are actually running out of good clays for making pottery. I know of four clay mines that have closed. A vein of porcelain clay that ran from Japan to southern England has been mined out in Japan.

Nov. 11 falls on Wednesday this year. It is a special day of remembrance. I spoke with the veteran who was in charge of poppy pins at one of the Dundas shops. He is among the few.

They are here because they were mere boys when they “joined up” for the thrill of adventure. Most of them do not speak of what became more than adventure. Whatever we think of wars, we owe the men and women recognition of their sacrifices.

Painters and Potters combine for classy event at community centre this weekend

News Nov 06, 2009 Ancaster News

Did the hobgoblins find your door, Faithful Reader? Not as many came to my door as usual. I distributed candies, wrapped in papers this year, to friends and casual acquaintances for most for the remainder of the week. As always, I wore my Viking helmet at the door. As usual it got little reaction from the costumed visitors. Their adult guardians gave me a smile.

That is the charm of small children. If I had painted my face green and worn a tail, I would have been quite acceptable. As long as I smiled and a parent or older sibling was in charge, the order of the day was to get candies into their bag and remember to say “Thank you.” This year to my delight, some of the original Halloween visitors returned with their children. An indication that I have grown roots in Dundas.

This is a week of long days and nights, F. R. I am involved with the Hamilton and Region Potters’ Guild sale Friday to Sunday as the Dundas community centre as always. This year the Carnegie Gallery has an exhibition Painters and Potters opening on Friday evening.

Beginning with the invitation’s design, this is a classy event. Painter members invited potter members to work with them. I was very pleased to be invited by Lorne Toews, painter and art teacher at Ontario College of Art to be his model/partner. Lorne came to my studio and took numerous photos of me. I gave him an unfired pitcher to decorate. It came as no surprise that he was a trifle intimidated to paint on a surface that was not flat, smooth, and forgiving. A pitcher picture.

He went home and painted a breathtaking, noble portrait of a woman who somewhat resembles me. She has something of the commanding presence of the Queen’s famous portrait. It goes far beyond my photograph. She is the sort of woman my mother always wanted me to be.

This exhibition has all the makings of one of the most memorable of the gallery’s finest. It’s a tribute to the folks who are devoted to continuing the founders’ high standards as we approach the landmark anniversary next year.

The Potters’ Guild also has an outstanding history. I have been a member since 1980. Not an original member. There are only a few left, alas. The HPG has evolved, carefully nurtured, from a small group of local potters to a membership that spans Southern Ontario. It is not the only guild, F. R. Since I began, as my mother remarked, mucking around in that stuff, the community colleges, Burlington Art Centre, Dundas Valley School of Art to name only a few of the local centres, have encouraged and broadened the arts and crafts. When I began pottery studies there were two or three books. The HPG has an entire lending library. I built my first humble kiln. Those were certainly the ‘horse and buggy’ days of our craft.

I delight in the displays of work at the semi-annual HPG sales. Many years ago I wrote an article for a ceramics magazine and the editor chose an adaptation from one sentence for the title. “The day of the good brown pot is over.” There are young potters who have no idea what that means!

On the flip side of that, we are actually running out of good clays for making pottery. I know of four clay mines that have closed. A vein of porcelain clay that ran from Japan to southern England has been mined out in Japan.

Nov. 11 falls on Wednesday this year. It is a special day of remembrance. I spoke with the veteran who was in charge of poppy pins at one of the Dundas shops. He is among the few.

They are here because they were mere boys when they “joined up” for the thrill of adventure. Most of them do not speak of what became more than adventure. Whatever we think of wars, we owe the men and women recognition of their sacrifices.

Painters and Potters combine for classy event at community centre this weekend

News Nov 06, 2009 Ancaster News

Did the hobgoblins find your door, Faithful Reader? Not as many came to my door as usual. I distributed candies, wrapped in papers this year, to friends and casual acquaintances for most for the remainder of the week. As always, I wore my Viking helmet at the door. As usual it got little reaction from the costumed visitors. Their adult guardians gave me a smile.

That is the charm of small children. If I had painted my face green and worn a tail, I would have been quite acceptable. As long as I smiled and a parent or older sibling was in charge, the order of the day was to get candies into their bag and remember to say “Thank you.” This year to my delight, some of the original Halloween visitors returned with their children. An indication that I have grown roots in Dundas.

This is a week of long days and nights, F. R. I am involved with the Hamilton and Region Potters’ Guild sale Friday to Sunday as the Dundas community centre as always. This year the Carnegie Gallery has an exhibition Painters and Potters opening on Friday evening.

Beginning with the invitation’s design, this is a classy event. Painter members invited potter members to work with them. I was very pleased to be invited by Lorne Toews, painter and art teacher at Ontario College of Art to be his model/partner. Lorne came to my studio and took numerous photos of me. I gave him an unfired pitcher to decorate. It came as no surprise that he was a trifle intimidated to paint on a surface that was not flat, smooth, and forgiving. A pitcher picture.

He went home and painted a breathtaking, noble portrait of a woman who somewhat resembles me. She has something of the commanding presence of the Queen’s famous portrait. It goes far beyond my photograph. She is the sort of woman my mother always wanted me to be.

This exhibition has all the makings of one of the most memorable of the gallery’s finest. It’s a tribute to the folks who are devoted to continuing the founders’ high standards as we approach the landmark anniversary next year.

The Potters’ Guild also has an outstanding history. I have been a member since 1980. Not an original member. There are only a few left, alas. The HPG has evolved, carefully nurtured, from a small group of local potters to a membership that spans Southern Ontario. It is not the only guild, F. R. Since I began, as my mother remarked, mucking around in that stuff, the community colleges, Burlington Art Centre, Dundas Valley School of Art to name only a few of the local centres, have encouraged and broadened the arts and crafts. When I began pottery studies there were two or three books. The HPG has an entire lending library. I built my first humble kiln. Those were certainly the ‘horse and buggy’ days of our craft.

I delight in the displays of work at the semi-annual HPG sales. Many years ago I wrote an article for a ceramics magazine and the editor chose an adaptation from one sentence for the title. “The day of the good brown pot is over.” There are young potters who have no idea what that means!

On the flip side of that, we are actually running out of good clays for making pottery. I know of four clay mines that have closed. A vein of porcelain clay that ran from Japan to southern England has been mined out in Japan.

Nov. 11 falls on Wednesday this year. It is a special day of remembrance. I spoke with the veteran who was in charge of poppy pins at one of the Dundas shops. He is among the few.

They are here because they were mere boys when they “joined up” for the thrill of adventure. Most of them do not speak of what became more than adventure. Whatever we think of wars, we owe the men and women recognition of their sacrifices.