Humour important technique to get attention

News Nov 06, 2009 Ancaster News

Re: Protecting their butts, Oct. 23 The News.

Wellwood, a local charity dedicated to helping people to live well with cancer, is proud to host the annual Walk/Run for Colorectal Cancer Awareness every October at McMaster University.

The theme of our event carries an important message: colorectal is the third most common cancer, and six per cent of the population will develop it in their lifetime. Yet, it is one of those cancers that people don't talk about, which is the reason for the slogan Don't Die of Embarrassment.

In a recent edition of Hamilton Community News, there was a photo of a group of McMaster students who ran the Wellwood race wearing their undies on the outside of their clothes to provide a visual reminder of the importance of protecting oneself from this devastating form of cancer. We received a call from a reader who was concerned the students were making fun of this serious issue. We thank her for the call, and for the opportunity to explain what was depicted.

The use of humour is an important way to get young people to pay attention to serious messages of cancer awareness. This is most helpful when we are talking about cancers that affect the more "private" regions of the body — the cancers that people often don't talk about — which is why there are so many campaigns that use humour as a tool to get young people to see a doctor when they detect unusual changes in their own bodies (for example, the Touch Yourself, Trust Yourself campaign encouraging self-examination) or when they detect those changes in others (such as the Save a Life, Grope your Wife campaign which is directed at individuals to encourage them to do breast exams on their female partners.)

After 11 years of organizing this event, we were thrilled to have the assistance of that very fun group of students in getting out the very serious message of colorectal cancer awareness and prevention. We also appreciated the call from the concerned reader so that we could respond with an invitation to all of your readers to educate themselves about colorectal cancer, including symptoms, screening, early detection and treatment, by visiting our friends at The Colorectal Cancer Association of Canada online at www.colorectal-cancer.ca .

For more information on Wellwood's programs, all of which are free of charge, please visit www.wellwood.on.ca , email us at well-wood@hhsc.ca or call 905-389-5884.

K. Jane George Executive Director, Wellwood

Humour important technique to get attention

News Nov 06, 2009 Ancaster News

Re: Protecting their butts, Oct. 23 The News.

Wellwood, a local charity dedicated to helping people to live well with cancer, is proud to host the annual Walk/Run for Colorectal Cancer Awareness every October at McMaster University.

The theme of our event carries an important message: colorectal is the third most common cancer, and six per cent of the population will develop it in their lifetime. Yet, it is one of those cancers that people don't talk about, which is the reason for the slogan Don't Die of Embarrassment.

In a recent edition of Hamilton Community News, there was a photo of a group of McMaster students who ran the Wellwood race wearing their undies on the outside of their clothes to provide a visual reminder of the importance of protecting oneself from this devastating form of cancer. We received a call from a reader who was concerned the students were making fun of this serious issue. We thank her for the call, and for the opportunity to explain what was depicted.

The use of humour is an important way to get young people to pay attention to serious messages of cancer awareness. This is most helpful when we are talking about cancers that affect the more "private" regions of the body — the cancers that people often don't talk about — which is why there are so many campaigns that use humour as a tool to get young people to see a doctor when they detect unusual changes in their own bodies (for example, the Touch Yourself, Trust Yourself campaign encouraging self-examination) or when they detect those changes in others (such as the Save a Life, Grope your Wife campaign which is directed at individuals to encourage them to do breast exams on their female partners.)

After 11 years of organizing this event, we were thrilled to have the assistance of that very fun group of students in getting out the very serious message of colorectal cancer awareness and prevention. We also appreciated the call from the concerned reader so that we could respond with an invitation to all of your readers to educate themselves about colorectal cancer, including symptoms, screening, early detection and treatment, by visiting our friends at The Colorectal Cancer Association of Canada online at www.colorectal-cancer.ca .

For more information on Wellwood's programs, all of which are free of charge, please visit www.wellwood.on.ca , email us at well-wood@hhsc.ca or call 905-389-5884.

K. Jane George Executive Director, Wellwood

Humour important technique to get attention

News Nov 06, 2009 Ancaster News

Re: Protecting their butts, Oct. 23 The News.

Wellwood, a local charity dedicated to helping people to live well with cancer, is proud to host the annual Walk/Run for Colorectal Cancer Awareness every October at McMaster University.

The theme of our event carries an important message: colorectal is the third most common cancer, and six per cent of the population will develop it in their lifetime. Yet, it is one of those cancers that people don't talk about, which is the reason for the slogan Don't Die of Embarrassment.

In a recent edition of Hamilton Community News, there was a photo of a group of McMaster students who ran the Wellwood race wearing their undies on the outside of their clothes to provide a visual reminder of the importance of protecting oneself from this devastating form of cancer. We received a call from a reader who was concerned the students were making fun of this serious issue. We thank her for the call, and for the opportunity to explain what was depicted.

The use of humour is an important way to get young people to pay attention to serious messages of cancer awareness. This is most helpful when we are talking about cancers that affect the more "private" regions of the body — the cancers that people often don't talk about — which is why there are so many campaigns that use humour as a tool to get young people to see a doctor when they detect unusual changes in their own bodies (for example, the Touch Yourself, Trust Yourself campaign encouraging self-examination) or when they detect those changes in others (such as the Save a Life, Grope your Wife campaign which is directed at individuals to encourage them to do breast exams on their female partners.)

After 11 years of organizing this event, we were thrilled to have the assistance of that very fun group of students in getting out the very serious message of colorectal cancer awareness and prevention. We also appreciated the call from the concerned reader so that we could respond with an invitation to all of your readers to educate themselves about colorectal cancer, including symptoms, screening, early detection and treatment, by visiting our friends at The Colorectal Cancer Association of Canada online at www.colorectal-cancer.ca .

For more information on Wellwood's programs, all of which are free of charge, please visit www.wellwood.on.ca , email us at well-wood@hhsc.ca or call 905-389-5884.

K. Jane George Executive Director, Wellwood