Candidates make final pitch to voters

News Apr 27, 2011 Ancaster News

In the final days of the federal election campaign, candidates from all the major parties are canvassing homes looking to secure your vote.

Six candidates are vying to represent Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale in the May 2 election.

Along with David Sweet, the Conservative incumbent, challengers include Liberal candidate Dave Braden, New Democrat Nancy MacBain, Green Party candidate Peter Ormond, Jamile Ghaddar of the Marxist-Leninist Party and Libertarian candidate Anthony Giles.

Braden said the Conservatives have shown a lack of integrity through repeated scandals, including a contempt of parliament charge that ultimately triggered the election.

“When a party leader stands up and says, ‘We’re in favour of honesty and integrity, and they’ve just been caught lying, that negative attitude starting from (Conservative leader Stephen) Harper has left a very bitter attitude among a lot of people.”

After canvassing areas in Flamborough recently, Braden said he is encouraged by the support he’s receiving. He said he recently converted a Waterdown resident who was previously a lifelong Conservative supporter.

“People that think about the future – they’re leaving the Conservatives,” said Braden.“What they’re telling me is they don’t like the attitude, particularly women.” Braden is a former deputy mayor of Flamborough and spent 15 years as a regional and city councillor for the area.Braden criticized the Conservatives for warning Canadians the country could suffer economic hardship if a Conservative government is not returned to Ottawa.

“It’s good to see that people are seeing through these politics and fear and threats,” said Braden.

“Harper is saying it’s it, or you’re going to go down the tubes. So I think there’s an element of desperation here.”

Citing cuts to corporate tax rates which the Liberals would reverse, and Conservative plans to purchase F-35 fighter jets, Braden believes a Liberal government would charge Canadians less in taxes.

“If you just want to be selfish and you want to put the charts up about who’s going to pay less tax, there’s no question you’re going to pay less tax if you vote Liberal. People don’t know that,” said Braden.

The Liberal candidate said the Conservatives have amassed a serious deficit during the last term in office, which will leave Canadians with a serious debt burden.

“When you talk about $56 billion in deficit in a year, people don’t get it. But if you say that translates into $5,000 more debt, per family, people get that.” David Sweet countered Braden’s remarks on taxes, saying his government has brought tax-freedom day three weeks sooner than in 2006. Sweet also doubts the Liberal plan to raise corporate tax rates from 16.5 to 18 per cent will stimulate economic growth.

Sweet pointed to the Liberal’s failed 2008 campaign, when former leader Stéphane Dion planned to create a carbon tax at a time when the country was already coping with high gas prices. He suggested tax increases for families are still a possibility with a Liberal government.

“We have the best position in the G7 for debt to GDP,” said Sweet. The incumbent also reiterated his party’s plan for a balanced budget by 2014-15.

Sweet said the number-one issue for ADFW voters is the economy.

“Seniors issues come up as well,” said Sweet, emphasizing his party’s support for tax credits to benefit low income seniors.

Banding together On the issue of honesty and accountability, Sweet said the contempt of parliament ruling was simply the result of three opposition parties banding together to force an election.

“When you talk about three opposition parties ganging up, the fact is the three opposition parties together have a majority,” said Sweet.

Sweet declined to speculate on the outcome of the election and whether the race will be tighter than his margin of victory in 2008. In that election, Sweet defeated his closest challenger, Liberal candidate Arlene MacFarlane-Vanderbeek, by nearly 11,000 votes.

NDP candidate Nancy MacBain plans to focus on key elements of her party’s platform, including programs for seniors, strengthening pensions and supporting small business. MacBain said she is aware of the issue of strategic voting and the possibility of losing left-leaning support to the Liberal candidate.

“We’re encouraging people to vote for the party and the candidate that they want,” said MacBain. “Strategic voting makes no sense and we’re not encouraging it.”

After receiving a positive showing of support during a door to door canvass of Dundas and Westdale, MacBain plans to focus her campaigning in the Ancaster and Waterdown areas this week, communities where NDP votes have traditionally been harder to come by. MacBain said small business tax relief in the NDP platform will help farmers save money and invest in their operations.

“We want to get back to the family farm and provide the resources that (farmers) need to do their job,” said MacBain.

MacBain said middle class voters are upset about taxes and continued cuts to corporate tax rates.

“They feel like they’re being gouged by the taxes,” said MacBain.

An NDP government would reverse previous cuts to the corporate tax rate approved with support from the Liberal and Conservative Parties, while investing the added revenue into social programs, said MacBain.

She added the NDP has no immediate plans to increase taxes for individuals. As a staff representative for CUPE 3906, MacBain represents teaching assistants, sessional faculty and post-doctoral students at McMaster University.

She hopes to advocate for increased funding for post-secondary education, arguing that Ontario now lags behind other Canadian provinces.

Green Party candidate Peter Ormond describes the election as a fear-based campaign, with voters feeling they are forced to choose between the lesser of two-evils.

“We need people to learn about our policies,” said Ormond.

Along with a plan to lower the cost of prescription drugs, a Green government would make funding to municipalities contingent upon sustainable development. The Green Party is opposed to urban sprawl and supports the protection of green space.

To illustrate his point, Ormond cited plans to close inner-city schools in Hamilton and bus students to suburban schools, a plan he believes, supports urban sprawl.

The Greens oppose nuclear energy and support research and development of renewable energy sources. Citing his party’s concerns with peak oil, Ormond is opposed to Hamilton’s airport employment growth district which was approved last year by city council. He said the airport-centred jobs will be mainly minimum wage warehousing positions on land that is better suited for agriculture.

The Green Party, which garnered more than one million votes in the 2008 federal election, has never elected a member of Parliament.

The party is proposing electoral reform through a system of proportional representation.

A PR system provides parties with representation based on the percentage of the popular vote the party receives.

Candidates make final pitch to voters

News Apr 27, 2011 Ancaster News

In the final days of the federal election campaign, candidates from all the major parties are canvassing homes looking to secure your vote.

Six candidates are vying to represent Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale in the May 2 election.

Along with David Sweet, the Conservative incumbent, challengers include Liberal candidate Dave Braden, New Democrat Nancy MacBain, Green Party candidate Peter Ormond, Jamile Ghaddar of the Marxist-Leninist Party and Libertarian candidate Anthony Giles.

Braden said the Conservatives have shown a lack of integrity through repeated scandals, including a contempt of parliament charge that ultimately triggered the election.

“When a party leader stands up and says, ‘We’re in favour of honesty and integrity, and they’ve just been caught lying, that negative attitude starting from (Conservative leader Stephen) Harper has left a very bitter attitude among a lot of people.”

After canvassing areas in Flamborough recently, Braden said he is encouraged by the support he’s receiving. He said he recently converted a Waterdown resident who was previously a lifelong Conservative supporter.

“People that think about the future – they’re leaving the Conservatives,” said Braden.“What they’re telling me is they don’t like the attitude, particularly women.” Braden is a former deputy mayor of Flamborough and spent 15 years as a regional and city councillor for the area.Braden criticized the Conservatives for warning Canadians the country could suffer economic hardship if a Conservative government is not returned to Ottawa.

“It’s good to see that people are seeing through these politics and fear and threats,” said Braden.

“Harper is saying it’s it, or you’re going to go down the tubes. So I think there’s an element of desperation here.”

Citing cuts to corporate tax rates which the Liberals would reverse, and Conservative plans to purchase F-35 fighter jets, Braden believes a Liberal government would charge Canadians less in taxes.

“If you just want to be selfish and you want to put the charts up about who’s going to pay less tax, there’s no question you’re going to pay less tax if you vote Liberal. People don’t know that,” said Braden.

The Liberal candidate said the Conservatives have amassed a serious deficit during the last term in office, which will leave Canadians with a serious debt burden.

“When you talk about $56 billion in deficit in a year, people don’t get it. But if you say that translates into $5,000 more debt, per family, people get that.” David Sweet countered Braden’s remarks on taxes, saying his government has brought tax-freedom day three weeks sooner than in 2006. Sweet also doubts the Liberal plan to raise corporate tax rates from 16.5 to 18 per cent will stimulate economic growth.

Sweet pointed to the Liberal’s failed 2008 campaign, when former leader Stéphane Dion planned to create a carbon tax at a time when the country was already coping with high gas prices. He suggested tax increases for families are still a possibility with a Liberal government.

“We have the best position in the G7 for debt to GDP,” said Sweet. The incumbent also reiterated his party’s plan for a balanced budget by 2014-15.

Sweet said the number-one issue for ADFW voters is the economy.

“Seniors issues come up as well,” said Sweet, emphasizing his party’s support for tax credits to benefit low income seniors.

Banding together On the issue of honesty and accountability, Sweet said the contempt of parliament ruling was simply the result of three opposition parties banding together to force an election.

“When you talk about three opposition parties ganging up, the fact is the three opposition parties together have a majority,” said Sweet.

Sweet declined to speculate on the outcome of the election and whether the race will be tighter than his margin of victory in 2008. In that election, Sweet defeated his closest challenger, Liberal candidate Arlene MacFarlane-Vanderbeek, by nearly 11,000 votes.

NDP candidate Nancy MacBain plans to focus on key elements of her party’s platform, including programs for seniors, strengthening pensions and supporting small business. MacBain said she is aware of the issue of strategic voting and the possibility of losing left-leaning support to the Liberal candidate.

“We’re encouraging people to vote for the party and the candidate that they want,” said MacBain. “Strategic voting makes no sense and we’re not encouraging it.”

After receiving a positive showing of support during a door to door canvass of Dundas and Westdale, MacBain plans to focus her campaigning in the Ancaster and Waterdown areas this week, communities where NDP votes have traditionally been harder to come by. MacBain said small business tax relief in the NDP platform will help farmers save money and invest in their operations.

“We want to get back to the family farm and provide the resources that (farmers) need to do their job,” said MacBain.

MacBain said middle class voters are upset about taxes and continued cuts to corporate tax rates.

“They feel like they’re being gouged by the taxes,” said MacBain.

An NDP government would reverse previous cuts to the corporate tax rate approved with support from the Liberal and Conservative Parties, while investing the added revenue into social programs, said MacBain.

She added the NDP has no immediate plans to increase taxes for individuals. As a staff representative for CUPE 3906, MacBain represents teaching assistants, sessional faculty and post-doctoral students at McMaster University.

She hopes to advocate for increased funding for post-secondary education, arguing that Ontario now lags behind other Canadian provinces.

Green Party candidate Peter Ormond describes the election as a fear-based campaign, with voters feeling they are forced to choose between the lesser of two-evils.

“We need people to learn about our policies,” said Ormond.

Along with a plan to lower the cost of prescription drugs, a Green government would make funding to municipalities contingent upon sustainable development. The Green Party is opposed to urban sprawl and supports the protection of green space.

To illustrate his point, Ormond cited plans to close inner-city schools in Hamilton and bus students to suburban schools, a plan he believes, supports urban sprawl.

The Greens oppose nuclear energy and support research and development of renewable energy sources. Citing his party’s concerns with peak oil, Ormond is opposed to Hamilton’s airport employment growth district which was approved last year by city council. He said the airport-centred jobs will be mainly minimum wage warehousing positions on land that is better suited for agriculture.

The Green Party, which garnered more than one million votes in the 2008 federal election, has never elected a member of Parliament.

The party is proposing electoral reform through a system of proportional representation.

A PR system provides parties with representation based on the percentage of the popular vote the party receives.

Candidates make final pitch to voters

News Apr 27, 2011 Ancaster News

In the final days of the federal election campaign, candidates from all the major parties are canvassing homes looking to secure your vote.

Six candidates are vying to represent Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale in the May 2 election.

Along with David Sweet, the Conservative incumbent, challengers include Liberal candidate Dave Braden, New Democrat Nancy MacBain, Green Party candidate Peter Ormond, Jamile Ghaddar of the Marxist-Leninist Party and Libertarian candidate Anthony Giles.

Braden said the Conservatives have shown a lack of integrity through repeated scandals, including a contempt of parliament charge that ultimately triggered the election.

“When a party leader stands up and says, ‘We’re in favour of honesty and integrity, and they’ve just been caught lying, that negative attitude starting from (Conservative leader Stephen) Harper has left a very bitter attitude among a lot of people.”

After canvassing areas in Flamborough recently, Braden said he is encouraged by the support he’s receiving. He said he recently converted a Waterdown resident who was previously a lifelong Conservative supporter.

“People that think about the future – they’re leaving the Conservatives,” said Braden.“What they’re telling me is they don’t like the attitude, particularly women.” Braden is a former deputy mayor of Flamborough and spent 15 years as a regional and city councillor for the area.Braden criticized the Conservatives for warning Canadians the country could suffer economic hardship if a Conservative government is not returned to Ottawa.

“It’s good to see that people are seeing through these politics and fear and threats,” said Braden.

“Harper is saying it’s it, or you’re going to go down the tubes. So I think there’s an element of desperation here.”

Citing cuts to corporate tax rates which the Liberals would reverse, and Conservative plans to purchase F-35 fighter jets, Braden believes a Liberal government would charge Canadians less in taxes.

“If you just want to be selfish and you want to put the charts up about who’s going to pay less tax, there’s no question you’re going to pay less tax if you vote Liberal. People don’t know that,” said Braden.

The Liberal candidate said the Conservatives have amassed a serious deficit during the last term in office, which will leave Canadians with a serious debt burden.

“When you talk about $56 billion in deficit in a year, people don’t get it. But if you say that translates into $5,000 more debt, per family, people get that.” David Sweet countered Braden’s remarks on taxes, saying his government has brought tax-freedom day three weeks sooner than in 2006. Sweet also doubts the Liberal plan to raise corporate tax rates from 16.5 to 18 per cent will stimulate economic growth.

Sweet pointed to the Liberal’s failed 2008 campaign, when former leader Stéphane Dion planned to create a carbon tax at a time when the country was already coping with high gas prices. He suggested tax increases for families are still a possibility with a Liberal government.

“We have the best position in the G7 for debt to GDP,” said Sweet. The incumbent also reiterated his party’s plan for a balanced budget by 2014-15.

Sweet said the number-one issue for ADFW voters is the economy.

“Seniors issues come up as well,” said Sweet, emphasizing his party’s support for tax credits to benefit low income seniors.

Banding together On the issue of honesty and accountability, Sweet said the contempt of parliament ruling was simply the result of three opposition parties banding together to force an election.

“When you talk about three opposition parties ganging up, the fact is the three opposition parties together have a majority,” said Sweet.

Sweet declined to speculate on the outcome of the election and whether the race will be tighter than his margin of victory in 2008. In that election, Sweet defeated his closest challenger, Liberal candidate Arlene MacFarlane-Vanderbeek, by nearly 11,000 votes.

NDP candidate Nancy MacBain plans to focus on key elements of her party’s platform, including programs for seniors, strengthening pensions and supporting small business. MacBain said she is aware of the issue of strategic voting and the possibility of losing left-leaning support to the Liberal candidate.

“We’re encouraging people to vote for the party and the candidate that they want,” said MacBain. “Strategic voting makes no sense and we’re not encouraging it.”

After receiving a positive showing of support during a door to door canvass of Dundas and Westdale, MacBain plans to focus her campaigning in the Ancaster and Waterdown areas this week, communities where NDP votes have traditionally been harder to come by. MacBain said small business tax relief in the NDP platform will help farmers save money and invest in their operations.

“We want to get back to the family farm and provide the resources that (farmers) need to do their job,” said MacBain.

MacBain said middle class voters are upset about taxes and continued cuts to corporate tax rates.

“They feel like they’re being gouged by the taxes,” said MacBain.

An NDP government would reverse previous cuts to the corporate tax rate approved with support from the Liberal and Conservative Parties, while investing the added revenue into social programs, said MacBain.

She added the NDP has no immediate plans to increase taxes for individuals. As a staff representative for CUPE 3906, MacBain represents teaching assistants, sessional faculty and post-doctoral students at McMaster University.

She hopes to advocate for increased funding for post-secondary education, arguing that Ontario now lags behind other Canadian provinces.

Green Party candidate Peter Ormond describes the election as a fear-based campaign, with voters feeling they are forced to choose between the lesser of two-evils.

“We need people to learn about our policies,” said Ormond.

Along with a plan to lower the cost of prescription drugs, a Green government would make funding to municipalities contingent upon sustainable development. The Green Party is opposed to urban sprawl and supports the protection of green space.

To illustrate his point, Ormond cited plans to close inner-city schools in Hamilton and bus students to suburban schools, a plan he believes, supports urban sprawl.

The Greens oppose nuclear energy and support research and development of renewable energy sources. Citing his party’s concerns with peak oil, Ormond is opposed to Hamilton’s airport employment growth district which was approved last year by city council. He said the airport-centred jobs will be mainly minimum wage warehousing positions on land that is better suited for agriculture.

The Green Party, which garnered more than one million votes in the 2008 federal election, has never elected a member of Parliament.

The party is proposing electoral reform through a system of proportional representation.

A PR system provides parties with representation based on the percentage of the popular vote the party receives.