Hundreds turn out to see Charles and Camilla

News Nov 05, 2009 Ancaster News

The sun broke through the clouds on a cool and dark day, with its bright rays falling on as the royal couple just as they walked out of Dundurn Castle’s balcony and waved to the enthusiastic crowd during day two of their cross-Canada tour.Earlier, Prince Charles and Camilla Parker-Bowles, the Duchess of Cornwall, ignored for the moment the official welcoming party at the castle and did what the estimated 1,500 people hoped they would do, wade into the crowd, greet them and provide a word of recognition.There had been some reports about the smaller-than-usual crowds greeting the royal couple in Newfoundland and Labrador, and Toronto earlier in the week. But hundreds of Hamiltonians came out two hours prior to the royal visit to Dundurn Castle and the HMCS Haida.Prince Charles, smiling in his dark blue suit, and the Duchess, wearing a beige wraparound shawl, walked along the barrier shaking hands, accepting flowers and gifts, and amiably chatting with children, clutching flowers, and men and women who were eagerly clicking photos, and squealing with delight.Canadian veteran John David, who lives on the Mountain, came to Dundurn hoping to give Prince Charles a recent photograph of a family friend piloting a CF-18 fighter jet.“I gave him the photograph,” said Mr. David, with a grin. “He seemed very happy. Then he shook my hand. It was very exciting.” After greeting the crowd for a few minutes, The royal couple then shook hands with Mayor Fred Eisenberger, his wife, Diane, and Liberal cabinet minister Ted McMeekin and his wife before taking a private tour of Dundurn Castle. They wandered onto the castle’s balcony, waving to the cheering crowd.Afterward they strode along the driveway, mixing with the people before taking part in a tree planting ceremony. Both shovelled some dirt onto the tree which was planted in the Castle’s front yard. The prince, chuckling, then poured some water onto the tree.The stately Dundurn Castle was built by the Camilla's great-great-great grandfather, Sir Allan Napier McNab, a pre-Confederation prime minister of Upper Canada, in 1835. Historians can trace that both the Prince and Duchess’s families crossed paths in the 1860s.The royal couple extended greetings with about 60 dignitaries who were sitting near the tree planting ceremony area, including former Lieutenant-Governor Lincoln Alexander and city councillors Maria Pearson and Lloyd Ferguson. At one point the crowd started chanting, “We want the king.”The 12-vehicle motorcade then travelled along York Boulevard to the Hamilton waterfront to tour the HMCS Haida.The royal couple were greeted by another giddy crowd that numbered in the hundreds. The prince and duchess weren’t lucky with the weather this time, as they had to endure gusty winds, rain and at one point hail. Still, they soldiered on touring through the Haida, while the Lancaster bomber flew overhead. They greeted volunteers and unveiled a plaque in honour of their visit.“It was quite the ceremony,” said David Adames, executive director of Tourism Hamilton. “This is great for Hamilton.”This is the first visit to Canada by the duchess, while it's the prince’s 15th time he has come to Canada, but first since he married the Camilla in 2005.Prince Charles was expected to travel to Niagara College in Niagara-on-the-Lake to tour the facility’s Teaching Winery in the afternoon. The duchess was scheduled to return to Toronto. Prince Charles was schedule to present the colours to a Toronto-area regiment in the evening.They are scheduled to open the Royal Winter Fair Friday and during their 11-day tour of Canada will make stops in Montreal, British Columbia, before returning to Ontario to take part in Remembrance Day ceremonies at the National War Memorial in Ottawa.

Hundreds turn out to see Charles and Camilla

News Nov 05, 2009 Ancaster News

The sun broke through the clouds on a cool and dark day, with its bright rays falling on as the royal couple just as they walked out of Dundurn Castle’s balcony and waved to the enthusiastic crowd during day two of their cross-Canada tour.Earlier, Prince Charles and Camilla Parker-Bowles, the Duchess of Cornwall, ignored for the moment the official welcoming party at the castle and did what the estimated 1,500 people hoped they would do, wade into the crowd, greet them and provide a word of recognition.There had been some reports about the smaller-than-usual crowds greeting the royal couple in Newfoundland and Labrador, and Toronto earlier in the week. But hundreds of Hamiltonians came out two hours prior to the royal visit to Dundurn Castle and the HMCS Haida.Prince Charles, smiling in his dark blue suit, and the Duchess, wearing a beige wraparound shawl, walked along the barrier shaking hands, accepting flowers and gifts, and amiably chatting with children, clutching flowers, and men and women who were eagerly clicking photos, and squealing with delight.Canadian veteran John David, who lives on the Mountain, came to Dundurn hoping to give Prince Charles a recent photograph of a family friend piloting a CF-18 fighter jet.“I gave him the photograph,” said Mr. David, with a grin. “He seemed very happy. Then he shook my hand. It was very exciting.” After greeting the crowd for a few minutes, The royal couple then shook hands with Mayor Fred Eisenberger, his wife, Diane, and Liberal cabinet minister Ted McMeekin and his wife before taking a private tour of Dundurn Castle. They wandered onto the castle’s balcony, waving to the cheering crowd.Afterward they strode along the driveway, mixing with the people before taking part in a tree planting ceremony. Both shovelled some dirt onto the tree which was planted in the Castle’s front yard. The prince, chuckling, then poured some water onto the tree.The stately Dundurn Castle was built by the Camilla's great-great-great grandfather, Sir Allan Napier McNab, a pre-Confederation prime minister of Upper Canada, in 1835. Historians can trace that both the Prince and Duchess’s families crossed paths in the 1860s.The royal couple extended greetings with about 60 dignitaries who were sitting near the tree planting ceremony area, including former Lieutenant-Governor Lincoln Alexander and city councillors Maria Pearson and Lloyd Ferguson. At one point the crowd started chanting, “We want the king.”The 12-vehicle motorcade then travelled along York Boulevard to the Hamilton waterfront to tour the HMCS Haida.The royal couple were greeted by another giddy crowd that numbered in the hundreds. The prince and duchess weren’t lucky with the weather this time, as they had to endure gusty winds, rain and at one point hail. Still, they soldiered on touring through the Haida, while the Lancaster bomber flew overhead. They greeted volunteers and unveiled a plaque in honour of their visit.“It was quite the ceremony,” said David Adames, executive director of Tourism Hamilton. “This is great for Hamilton.”This is the first visit to Canada by the duchess, while it's the prince’s 15th time he has come to Canada, but first since he married the Camilla in 2005.Prince Charles was expected to travel to Niagara College in Niagara-on-the-Lake to tour the facility’s Teaching Winery in the afternoon. The duchess was scheduled to return to Toronto. Prince Charles was schedule to present the colours to a Toronto-area regiment in the evening.They are scheduled to open the Royal Winter Fair Friday and during their 11-day tour of Canada will make stops in Montreal, British Columbia, before returning to Ontario to take part in Remembrance Day ceremonies at the National War Memorial in Ottawa.

Hundreds turn out to see Charles and Camilla

News Nov 05, 2009 Ancaster News

The sun broke through the clouds on a cool and dark day, with its bright rays falling on as the royal couple just as they walked out of Dundurn Castle’s balcony and waved to the enthusiastic crowd during day two of their cross-Canada tour.Earlier, Prince Charles and Camilla Parker-Bowles, the Duchess of Cornwall, ignored for the moment the official welcoming party at the castle and did what the estimated 1,500 people hoped they would do, wade into the crowd, greet them and provide a word of recognition.There had been some reports about the smaller-than-usual crowds greeting the royal couple in Newfoundland and Labrador, and Toronto earlier in the week. But hundreds of Hamiltonians came out two hours prior to the royal visit to Dundurn Castle and the HMCS Haida.Prince Charles, smiling in his dark blue suit, and the Duchess, wearing a beige wraparound shawl, walked along the barrier shaking hands, accepting flowers and gifts, and amiably chatting with children, clutching flowers, and men and women who were eagerly clicking photos, and squealing with delight.Canadian veteran John David, who lives on the Mountain, came to Dundurn hoping to give Prince Charles a recent photograph of a family friend piloting a CF-18 fighter jet.“I gave him the photograph,” said Mr. David, with a grin. “He seemed very happy. Then he shook my hand. It was very exciting.” After greeting the crowd for a few minutes, The royal couple then shook hands with Mayor Fred Eisenberger, his wife, Diane, and Liberal cabinet minister Ted McMeekin and his wife before taking a private tour of Dundurn Castle. They wandered onto the castle’s balcony, waving to the cheering crowd.Afterward they strode along the driveway, mixing with the people before taking part in a tree planting ceremony. Both shovelled some dirt onto the tree which was planted in the Castle’s front yard. The prince, chuckling, then poured some water onto the tree.The stately Dundurn Castle was built by the Camilla's great-great-great grandfather, Sir Allan Napier McNab, a pre-Confederation prime minister of Upper Canada, in 1835. Historians can trace that both the Prince and Duchess’s families crossed paths in the 1860s.The royal couple extended greetings with about 60 dignitaries who were sitting near the tree planting ceremony area, including former Lieutenant-Governor Lincoln Alexander and city councillors Maria Pearson and Lloyd Ferguson. At one point the crowd started chanting, “We want the king.”The 12-vehicle motorcade then travelled along York Boulevard to the Hamilton waterfront to tour the HMCS Haida.The royal couple were greeted by another giddy crowd that numbered in the hundreds. The prince and duchess weren’t lucky with the weather this time, as they had to endure gusty winds, rain and at one point hail. Still, they soldiered on touring through the Haida, while the Lancaster bomber flew overhead. They greeted volunteers and unveiled a plaque in honour of their visit.“It was quite the ceremony,” said David Adames, executive director of Tourism Hamilton. “This is great for Hamilton.”This is the first visit to Canada by the duchess, while it's the prince’s 15th time he has come to Canada, but first since he married the Camilla in 2005.Prince Charles was expected to travel to Niagara College in Niagara-on-the-Lake to tour the facility’s Teaching Winery in the afternoon. The duchess was scheduled to return to Toronto. Prince Charles was schedule to present the colours to a Toronto-area regiment in the evening.They are scheduled to open the Royal Winter Fair Friday and during their 11-day tour of Canada will make stops in Montreal, British Columbia, before returning to Ontario to take part in Remembrance Day ceremonies at the National War Memorial in Ottawa.