City considers residential surveillance camera bylaw

News Nov 05, 2009 Ancaster News

 

 

A dispute between two Waterdown neighbours and a Peeping Tom

incident in St. Catharines has prompted Hamilton councillors to consider

approving a bylaw that would outlaw residential surveillance cameras that point

into other people’s homes.

“This is something I’m growing more and more concerned

about,” said Stoney Creek councillor Brad Clark last week during the Oct. 28

council meeting. “It’s creepy.”

In Waterdown, there have been a long-standing problem

between two homeowners over a so-called “Berlin Wall” that one neighbour has

built. Also involved is the owner with the wall has installed backyard cameras

that point into the adjacent neighbour’s property who has been criticizing the

wall.

And earlier this year a St. Catharines single mother with

two teenage daughters installed nighttime backyard cameras that captured their

neighbour’s son masturbating while looking into her daughters’ rooms. This

September the so-called Peeping Tom’s parents installed their own night vision

surveillance cameras and pointed them into the direction of the single mother’s

home.

The Niagara Regional Police, and the Attorney General have

not conclusively commented on the issue, except for labeling it a “neighbour

dispute.”

Mr. Clark, and Ancaster councillor Lloyd Ferguson, found the

implications of allowing residents to install cameras that point into other

property owners’ property disturbing.

Mr. Clark asked city officials and legal representatives to investigate

the feasibility of crafting a bylaw to prohibit residential surveillance

cameras.

“You have to be sure the bylaw doesn’t tread into violating

privacy,” said Mr. Clark. “You’d have to approach it very carefully.”

“The cameras are so cheap (to buy and install),” said Mr.

Ferguson. “This is crazy.”

Just to add to the delicate issues politicians were entering

into, Mountain councillor Terry Whitehead asked how would police or the city’s

bylaw enforcement staff determine where the cameras were pointed?

It is unknown how long it will take for staff to craft a

report to prohibit surveillance cameras.

City considers residential surveillance camera bylaw

News Nov 05, 2009 Ancaster News

 

 

A dispute between two Waterdown neighbours and a Peeping Tom

incident in St. Catharines has prompted Hamilton councillors to consider

approving a bylaw that would outlaw residential surveillance cameras that point

into other people’s homes.

“This is something I’m growing more and more concerned

about,” said Stoney Creek councillor Brad Clark last week during the Oct. 28

council meeting. “It’s creepy.”

In Waterdown, there have been a long-standing problem

between two homeowners over a so-called “Berlin Wall” that one neighbour has

built. Also involved is the owner with the wall has installed backyard cameras

that point into the adjacent neighbour’s property who has been criticizing the

wall.

And earlier this year a St. Catharines single mother with

two teenage daughters installed nighttime backyard cameras that captured their

neighbour’s son masturbating while looking into her daughters’ rooms. This

September the so-called Peeping Tom’s parents installed their own night vision

surveillance cameras and pointed them into the direction of the single mother’s

home.

The Niagara Regional Police, and the Attorney General have

not conclusively commented on the issue, except for labeling it a “neighbour

dispute.”

Mr. Clark, and Ancaster councillor Lloyd Ferguson, found the

implications of allowing residents to install cameras that point into other

property owners’ property disturbing.

Mr. Clark asked city officials and legal representatives to investigate

the feasibility of crafting a bylaw to prohibit residential surveillance

cameras.

“You have to be sure the bylaw doesn’t tread into violating

privacy,” said Mr. Clark. “You’d have to approach it very carefully.”

“The cameras are so cheap (to buy and install),” said Mr.

Ferguson. “This is crazy.”

Just to add to the delicate issues politicians were entering

into, Mountain councillor Terry Whitehead asked how would police or the city’s

bylaw enforcement staff determine where the cameras were pointed?

It is unknown how long it will take for staff to craft a

report to prohibit surveillance cameras.

City considers residential surveillance camera bylaw

News Nov 05, 2009 Ancaster News

 

 

A dispute between two Waterdown neighbours and a Peeping Tom

incident in St. Catharines has prompted Hamilton councillors to consider

approving a bylaw that would outlaw residential surveillance cameras that point

into other people’s homes.

“This is something I’m growing more and more concerned

about,” said Stoney Creek councillor Brad Clark last week during the Oct. 28

council meeting. “It’s creepy.”

In Waterdown, there have been a long-standing problem

between two homeowners over a so-called “Berlin Wall” that one neighbour has

built. Also involved is the owner with the wall has installed backyard cameras

that point into the adjacent neighbour’s property who has been criticizing the

wall.

And earlier this year a St. Catharines single mother with

two teenage daughters installed nighttime backyard cameras that captured their

neighbour’s son masturbating while looking into her daughters’ rooms. This

September the so-called Peeping Tom’s parents installed their own night vision

surveillance cameras and pointed them into the direction of the single mother’s

home.

The Niagara Regional Police, and the Attorney General have

not conclusively commented on the issue, except for labeling it a “neighbour

dispute.”

Mr. Clark, and Ancaster councillor Lloyd Ferguson, found the

implications of allowing residents to install cameras that point into other

property owners’ property disturbing.

Mr. Clark asked city officials and legal representatives to investigate

the feasibility of crafting a bylaw to prohibit residential surveillance

cameras.

“You have to be sure the bylaw doesn’t tread into violating

privacy,” said Mr. Clark. “You’d have to approach it very carefully.”

“The cameras are so cheap (to buy and install),” said Mr.

Ferguson. “This is crazy.”

Just to add to the delicate issues politicians were entering

into, Mountain councillor Terry Whitehead asked how would police or the city’s

bylaw enforcement staff determine where the cameras were pointed?

It is unknown how long it will take for staff to craft a

report to prohibit surveillance cameras.