Ancaster industrial park continues to expand

News Nov 06, 2009 Ancaster News

Businesses can’t get enough of the Ancaster Industrial Park.

Ancaster Councillor Lloyd Ferguson said the park is again sold out of land for potential businesses. But help is on the way when the city next year begins building a second access point to enter the popular part that should free up more acres for hungry businesses.

“Everybody is interested in the Ancaster Business Park,” said Mr. Ferguson.

He said despite the economic slowdown that has depressed most business opportunities, Hamilton’s economic development department sold about 35 acres of land at the park over the last few months.

“It’s incredibly popular now,” he said. “We are sold out of land now.”

The park received a huge boost this spring when Tim Hortons announced it would locate a 74,000- square-foot, $30-million state-of-the-art production and roasting facility at the park.

The company chose Ancaster over a Brantford location. Construction was expected to begin later this year, and the facility will eventually employee 50 full-time employees.

Hamilton officials have cited the park’s strategic location to Highway 403, and related commercial and residential development, as reasons businesses are lining up to move into the space.

Mr. Ferguson said the idea to expand capacity at the park involves extending Cormorant Road to Trinity Road. The tendering process is expected to begin this winter.

He said the city this week closed the deal to start the expansion project. It is not clear how many acres will be created through the road extension.

“Its purpose is to generate jobs,” said Mr. Ferguson. “The main reason we are doing it is that about 30,000 people leave Hamilton every day and go to work to some place else.”

The Ancaster Industrial Park, located between Shaver and Trinity roads north and south of Wilson Street, contains 660 acres of employment land. The park was created in the early 1980s to try and boost Hamilton’s employment capabilities.

Guy Paparella, director of industrial parks and airport development said interest in the park continues to be at a high level.

He said in a recent interview the city is in the position to choose which companies can purchase the land, and sometimes even turn away disappointed business in such a competitive market.

The land at the industrial park has sold at competitive prices anywhere from $150,000 to $200,000 per acre.

A typical 20,000-square-foot manufacturing facility requires about two acres of land.

The business park is getting a heavy dose of attention as the planning is nearly completed on developing the airport employment lands.

The city’s preferred option for how to build out the lands is expected to be presented to the airport community liaison committee this month.

The schedule, said Al Fletcher, of the city’s planning department, is to present the comprehensive secondary plan to councillors at their March 2 planning meeting.

The proposed idea is to develop the properties in two stages, with phase one involving Highway 6 to Fiddler’s Green, and phase two from Highway 6 to Upper James.

Ancaster industrial park continues to expand

News Nov 06, 2009 Ancaster News

Businesses can’t get enough of the Ancaster Industrial Park.

Ancaster Councillor Lloyd Ferguson said the park is again sold out of land for potential businesses. But help is on the way when the city next year begins building a second access point to enter the popular part that should free up more acres for hungry businesses.

“Everybody is interested in the Ancaster Business Park,” said Mr. Ferguson.

He said despite the economic slowdown that has depressed most business opportunities, Hamilton’s economic development department sold about 35 acres of land at the park over the last few months.

“It’s incredibly popular now,” he said. “We are sold out of land now.”

The park received a huge boost this spring when Tim Hortons announced it would locate a 74,000- square-foot, $30-million state-of-the-art production and roasting facility at the park.

The company chose Ancaster over a Brantford location. Construction was expected to begin later this year, and the facility will eventually employee 50 full-time employees.

Hamilton officials have cited the park’s strategic location to Highway 403, and related commercial and residential development, as reasons businesses are lining up to move into the space.

Mr. Ferguson said the idea to expand capacity at the park involves extending Cormorant Road to Trinity Road. The tendering process is expected to begin this winter.

He said the city this week closed the deal to start the expansion project. It is not clear how many acres will be created through the road extension.

“Its purpose is to generate jobs,” said Mr. Ferguson. “The main reason we are doing it is that about 30,000 people leave Hamilton every day and go to work to some place else.”

The Ancaster Industrial Park, located between Shaver and Trinity roads north and south of Wilson Street, contains 660 acres of employment land. The park was created in the early 1980s to try and boost Hamilton’s employment capabilities.

Guy Paparella, director of industrial parks and airport development said interest in the park continues to be at a high level.

He said in a recent interview the city is in the position to choose which companies can purchase the land, and sometimes even turn away disappointed business in such a competitive market.

The land at the industrial park has sold at competitive prices anywhere from $150,000 to $200,000 per acre.

A typical 20,000-square-foot manufacturing facility requires about two acres of land.

The business park is getting a heavy dose of attention as the planning is nearly completed on developing the airport employment lands.

The city’s preferred option for how to build out the lands is expected to be presented to the airport community liaison committee this month.

The schedule, said Al Fletcher, of the city’s planning department, is to present the comprehensive secondary plan to councillors at their March 2 planning meeting.

The proposed idea is to develop the properties in two stages, with phase one involving Highway 6 to Fiddler’s Green, and phase two from Highway 6 to Upper James.

Ancaster industrial park continues to expand

News Nov 06, 2009 Ancaster News

Businesses can’t get enough of the Ancaster Industrial Park.

Ancaster Councillor Lloyd Ferguson said the park is again sold out of land for potential businesses. But help is on the way when the city next year begins building a second access point to enter the popular part that should free up more acres for hungry businesses.

“Everybody is interested in the Ancaster Business Park,” said Mr. Ferguson.

He said despite the economic slowdown that has depressed most business opportunities, Hamilton’s economic development department sold about 35 acres of land at the park over the last few months.

“It’s incredibly popular now,” he said. “We are sold out of land now.”

The park received a huge boost this spring when Tim Hortons announced it would locate a 74,000- square-foot, $30-million state-of-the-art production and roasting facility at the park.

The company chose Ancaster over a Brantford location. Construction was expected to begin later this year, and the facility will eventually employee 50 full-time employees.

Hamilton officials have cited the park’s strategic location to Highway 403, and related commercial and residential development, as reasons businesses are lining up to move into the space.

Mr. Ferguson said the idea to expand capacity at the park involves extending Cormorant Road to Trinity Road. The tendering process is expected to begin this winter.

He said the city this week closed the deal to start the expansion project. It is not clear how many acres will be created through the road extension.

“Its purpose is to generate jobs,” said Mr. Ferguson. “The main reason we are doing it is that about 30,000 people leave Hamilton every day and go to work to some place else.”

The Ancaster Industrial Park, located between Shaver and Trinity roads north and south of Wilson Street, contains 660 acres of employment land. The park was created in the early 1980s to try and boost Hamilton’s employment capabilities.

Guy Paparella, director of industrial parks and airport development said interest in the park continues to be at a high level.

He said in a recent interview the city is in the position to choose which companies can purchase the land, and sometimes even turn away disappointed business in such a competitive market.

The land at the industrial park has sold at competitive prices anywhere from $150,000 to $200,000 per acre.

A typical 20,000-square-foot manufacturing facility requires about two acres of land.

The business park is getting a heavy dose of attention as the planning is nearly completed on developing the airport employment lands.

The city’s preferred option for how to build out the lands is expected to be presented to the airport community liaison committee this month.

The schedule, said Al Fletcher, of the city’s planning department, is to present the comprehensive secondary plan to councillors at their March 2 planning meeting.

The proposed idea is to develop the properties in two stages, with phase one involving Highway 6 to Fiddler’s Green, and phase two from Highway 6 to Upper James.