City ready to party like it was 2015

News Nov 06, 2009 Ancaster News

Hamilton officials hope their 2015 Pan Am Games party Friday is a more joyous occasion than the deflating kick in the butt the city received after the 2010 Commonweath Games announcement left people at Copps Coliseum dejected.

“We are feeling pretty good,” said David Adames, executive director of Tourism Hamilton and the city’s liaison to the 2015 Pan Am Bid.

“(The bid organizers) have done everything they can. They have worked hard and now they will be talking to people on the ground. It’s almost like a political convention.”

The Pan American Sports Organization is expected to decide Nov. 6 in Guadalajara, Mexico, whether the Golden Horseshoe bid, which includes Hamilton and 13 other municipalities, will host the 2015 Pan Am Games, over competitors Lima, Peru, and Bogota, Columbia.

A reception, and potential party, will be hosted by Hamilton officials at the Parks Canada Marine Discovery Centre from 5-7 p. m. The announcement is scheduled to be made around 6:30 p. m.

Hamilton lost out to New Delhi, India, to host the 2010 Commonwealth Games in a decision that left a bad taste in the mouths of local officials.

“Now is the time to focus on our message,” said Mr. Adames, who was involved in that bid process.

Hamilton is not represented in the 50-member bid delegation in Mexico, said Mr. Adames. Toronto Mayor David Miller is included, along with Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty, the Ontario Minister of Health Promotion Margaret Best, federal Minister of State for Sport Gary Lunn, David Peterson, the 2015 Pan Am Games bid chair, bid president Jagoda Pike, and Canadian Olympic executives.

Hamilton officials are crossing their fingers for a nod in their direction. Hosting the games will mean millions of dollars in infrastructure development, a new much-anticipated light-rail transit system, and untold millions more in advertising, marketing and economic development.

“There is a lot turning on this decision,” said Ancaster Councillor Lloyd Ferguson.”

$1.43 billion budget

As part of the $1.43 billion budget for the games, Hamilton is expected to reap about $170 million for a 15,000-seat stadium, proposed for the northwest corner of Bay and Barton streets, which could be transformed into a 25,000-seat facility for the Tiger-Cats; $11.3 million for a 3,500-seat velodrome; and $35-million for a pool at McMaster University. Hamilton’s contribution to the games will be about $60 million.

But if the bid fails, Mr. Adames acknowledged the city is developing a business plan that will mean a new stadium to replace the aging Ivor Wynne.

“They are working on a business plan for both scenarios,” he said. “They have been doing it for a year or so.”

He said it is expected to be introduced to councillors next February.

“It will be up to council to determine what happens next,” he said.

Mr. Ferguson was more pessimistic about what would happen if the bid fails, and the city moved forward with a new stadium.

“It’s a question of can we afford (a stadium) if we don’t get it? I don’t think we can,” he said.

City ready to party like it was 2015

News Nov 06, 2009 Ancaster News

Hamilton officials hope their 2015 Pan Am Games party Friday is a more joyous occasion than the deflating kick in the butt the city received after the 2010 Commonweath Games announcement left people at Copps Coliseum dejected.

“We are feeling pretty good,” said David Adames, executive director of Tourism Hamilton and the city’s liaison to the 2015 Pan Am Bid.

“(The bid organizers) have done everything they can. They have worked hard and now they will be talking to people on the ground. It’s almost like a political convention.”

The Pan American Sports Organization is expected to decide Nov. 6 in Guadalajara, Mexico, whether the Golden Horseshoe bid, which includes Hamilton and 13 other municipalities, will host the 2015 Pan Am Games, over competitors Lima, Peru, and Bogota, Columbia.

A reception, and potential party, will be hosted by Hamilton officials at the Parks Canada Marine Discovery Centre from 5-7 p. m. The announcement is scheduled to be made around 6:30 p. m.

Hamilton lost out to New Delhi, India, to host the 2010 Commonwealth Games in a decision that left a bad taste in the mouths of local officials.

“Now is the time to focus on our message,” said Mr. Adames, who was involved in that bid process.

Hamilton is not represented in the 50-member bid delegation in Mexico, said Mr. Adames. Toronto Mayor David Miller is included, along with Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty, the Ontario Minister of Health Promotion Margaret Best, federal Minister of State for Sport Gary Lunn, David Peterson, the 2015 Pan Am Games bid chair, bid president Jagoda Pike, and Canadian Olympic executives.

Hamilton officials are crossing their fingers for a nod in their direction. Hosting the games will mean millions of dollars in infrastructure development, a new much-anticipated light-rail transit system, and untold millions more in advertising, marketing and economic development.

“There is a lot turning on this decision,” said Ancaster Councillor Lloyd Ferguson.”

$1.43 billion budget

As part of the $1.43 billion budget for the games, Hamilton is expected to reap about $170 million for a 15,000-seat stadium, proposed for the northwest corner of Bay and Barton streets, which could be transformed into a 25,000-seat facility for the Tiger-Cats; $11.3 million for a 3,500-seat velodrome; and $35-million for a pool at McMaster University. Hamilton’s contribution to the games will be about $60 million.

But if the bid fails, Mr. Adames acknowledged the city is developing a business plan that will mean a new stadium to replace the aging Ivor Wynne.

“They are working on a business plan for both scenarios,” he said. “They have been doing it for a year or so.”

He said it is expected to be introduced to councillors next February.

“It will be up to council to determine what happens next,” he said.

Mr. Ferguson was more pessimistic about what would happen if the bid fails, and the city moved forward with a new stadium.

“It’s a question of can we afford (a stadium) if we don’t get it? I don’t think we can,” he said.

City ready to party like it was 2015

News Nov 06, 2009 Ancaster News

Hamilton officials hope their 2015 Pan Am Games party Friday is a more joyous occasion than the deflating kick in the butt the city received after the 2010 Commonweath Games announcement left people at Copps Coliseum dejected.

“We are feeling pretty good,” said David Adames, executive director of Tourism Hamilton and the city’s liaison to the 2015 Pan Am Bid.

“(The bid organizers) have done everything they can. They have worked hard and now they will be talking to people on the ground. It’s almost like a political convention.”

The Pan American Sports Organization is expected to decide Nov. 6 in Guadalajara, Mexico, whether the Golden Horseshoe bid, which includes Hamilton and 13 other municipalities, will host the 2015 Pan Am Games, over competitors Lima, Peru, and Bogota, Columbia.

A reception, and potential party, will be hosted by Hamilton officials at the Parks Canada Marine Discovery Centre from 5-7 p. m. The announcement is scheduled to be made around 6:30 p. m.

Hamilton lost out to New Delhi, India, to host the 2010 Commonwealth Games in a decision that left a bad taste in the mouths of local officials.

“Now is the time to focus on our message,” said Mr. Adames, who was involved in that bid process.

Hamilton is not represented in the 50-member bid delegation in Mexico, said Mr. Adames. Toronto Mayor David Miller is included, along with Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty, the Ontario Minister of Health Promotion Margaret Best, federal Minister of State for Sport Gary Lunn, David Peterson, the 2015 Pan Am Games bid chair, bid president Jagoda Pike, and Canadian Olympic executives.

Hamilton officials are crossing their fingers for a nod in their direction. Hosting the games will mean millions of dollars in infrastructure development, a new much-anticipated light-rail transit system, and untold millions more in advertising, marketing and economic development.

“There is a lot turning on this decision,” said Ancaster Councillor Lloyd Ferguson.”

$1.43 billion budget

As part of the $1.43 billion budget for the games, Hamilton is expected to reap about $170 million for a 15,000-seat stadium, proposed for the northwest corner of Bay and Barton streets, which could be transformed into a 25,000-seat facility for the Tiger-Cats; $11.3 million for a 3,500-seat velodrome; and $35-million for a pool at McMaster University. Hamilton’s contribution to the games will be about $60 million.

But if the bid fails, Mr. Adames acknowledged the city is developing a business plan that will mean a new stadium to replace the aging Ivor Wynne.

“They are working on a business plan for both scenarios,” he said. “They have been doing it for a year or so.”

He said it is expected to be introduced to councillors next February.

“It will be up to council to determine what happens next,” he said.

Mr. Ferguson was more pessimistic about what would happen if the bid fails, and the city moved forward with a new stadium.

“It’s a question of can we afford (a stadium) if we don’t get it? I don’t think we can,” he said.