Heritage tree hunters earn awards for spotting winners

News Oct 30, 2009 Ancaster News

An historic tulip tree on Cross Street in Dundas has been recognized as the best overall tree in the Dundas Valley Tree Keepers’ first Heritage Tree Hunt.

Best overall was one of 11 awards scheduled to be handed out Wednesday night at a celebration to honor all the winners and several honorable mentions.

According to information provided by the DVTK, the Cross Street tulip tree “is believed to be an original tree in the area and not intentionally planted. The year predates the home built in 1845.”

Tour buses often stop to give visitors a look at the tulip tree – no surprise given that it’s found well outside the areas where Ontario’s Ministry of Natural Resources says it can be found.

“The tulip tree grows in only a few parts of Ontario – on the south shore of Lake Huron, the north shore of Lake Erie and in the Niagara Peninsula,” the ministry’s online tree atlas states.

The landmark Chinquapin oak, in Fisher’s Mill Park across from the former Dundas District School, won in the rare tree category “due to its being here at the northern reaches of its range in southern Ontario and being an outstanding specimen for size at 135 centimeters diameter.”

A bur oak in Dundas Driving Park earned the title in the Historical Landmark category. The tree’s nominator wrote: “This huge oak figures prominently in old photographs of the Driving Park and people’s family photos.”

Complete Heritage Tree Hunt results will be posted to the DVTK website at www.dundastrees.ca

The group plans to nominate some of the significant local heritage trees to the Trees Ontario Heritage Tree Program, and the Honour Roll of Ontario Trees created by the Ontario Forestry Association.

The group will also consider publishing a Dundas Valley Heritage Tree map or calendar, and possibly collecting seeds to propagate some of the significant trees identified in the hunt.

Heritage tree hunters earn awards for spotting winners

News Oct 30, 2009 Ancaster News

An historic tulip tree on Cross Street in Dundas has been recognized as the best overall tree in the Dundas Valley Tree Keepers’ first Heritage Tree Hunt.

Best overall was one of 11 awards scheduled to be handed out Wednesday night at a celebration to honor all the winners and several honorable mentions.

According to information provided by the DVTK, the Cross Street tulip tree “is believed to be an original tree in the area and not intentionally planted. The year predates the home built in 1845.”

Tour buses often stop to give visitors a look at the tulip tree – no surprise given that it’s found well outside the areas where Ontario’s Ministry of Natural Resources says it can be found.

“The tulip tree grows in only a few parts of Ontario – on the south shore of Lake Huron, the north shore of Lake Erie and in the Niagara Peninsula,” the ministry’s online tree atlas states.

The landmark Chinquapin oak, in Fisher’s Mill Park across from the former Dundas District School, won in the rare tree category “due to its being here at the northern reaches of its range in southern Ontario and being an outstanding specimen for size at 135 centimeters diameter.”

A bur oak in Dundas Driving Park earned the title in the Historical Landmark category. The tree’s nominator wrote: “This huge oak figures prominently in old photographs of the Driving Park and people’s family photos.”

Complete Heritage Tree Hunt results will be posted to the DVTK website at www.dundastrees.ca

The group plans to nominate some of the significant local heritage trees to the Trees Ontario Heritage Tree Program, and the Honour Roll of Ontario Trees created by the Ontario Forestry Association.

The group will also consider publishing a Dundas Valley Heritage Tree map or calendar, and possibly collecting seeds to propagate some of the significant trees identified in the hunt.

Heritage tree hunters earn awards for spotting winners

News Oct 30, 2009 Ancaster News

An historic tulip tree on Cross Street in Dundas has been recognized as the best overall tree in the Dundas Valley Tree Keepers’ first Heritage Tree Hunt.

Best overall was one of 11 awards scheduled to be handed out Wednesday night at a celebration to honor all the winners and several honorable mentions.

According to information provided by the DVTK, the Cross Street tulip tree “is believed to be an original tree in the area and not intentionally planted. The year predates the home built in 1845.”

Tour buses often stop to give visitors a look at the tulip tree – no surprise given that it’s found well outside the areas where Ontario’s Ministry of Natural Resources says it can be found.

“The tulip tree grows in only a few parts of Ontario – on the south shore of Lake Huron, the north shore of Lake Erie and in the Niagara Peninsula,” the ministry’s online tree atlas states.

The landmark Chinquapin oak, in Fisher’s Mill Park across from the former Dundas District School, won in the rare tree category “due to its being here at the northern reaches of its range in southern Ontario and being an outstanding specimen for size at 135 centimeters diameter.”

A bur oak in Dundas Driving Park earned the title in the Historical Landmark category. The tree’s nominator wrote: “This huge oak figures prominently in old photographs of the Driving Park and people’s family photos.”

Complete Heritage Tree Hunt results will be posted to the DVTK website at www.dundastrees.ca

The group plans to nominate some of the significant local heritage trees to the Trees Ontario Heritage Tree Program, and the Honour Roll of Ontario Trees created by the Ontario Forestry Association.

The group will also consider publishing a Dundas Valley Heritage Tree map or calendar, and possibly collecting seeds to propagate some of the significant trees identified in the hunt.