MPs bestowed with right to make false documents

News Oct 30, 2009 Ancaster News

Re: Stephen’s stimulus slush fund, Oct. 23 The News.

Active and latent “wannabe” forgers and counterfeiters jumped for joy this past week when Prime Minister Stephen Harper unilaterally decriminalized forgery and counterfeiting after dismissing allegations his MPs were doing just that by presenting ceremonial cheques to their constituents that bear their names, and/or party and/or signature.

Under the Criminal Code of Canada, forgery is defined as, “The making of a false document knowing it to be false with intent that it should be used or acted on as genuine to the prejudice of another.” It appears that Conservative MPs have been bestowed with the right to make false documents in the way of presenting ceremonial cheques — which represent Government of Canada taxpayer dollars — to constituencies, thus granting them the authority to knowingly issue a false document to the public with the intent of taking partisan credit for the face value of the cheques.

In the world of politics, perception is everything. If public perception of a political party or its members is negative, it is a liability. If perception is positive, it is an asset. The Conservatives seem willing to stoop to any measure to create that valuable currency — literally by printing their "own" money.

While the cheques are ceremonial, they do, in fact, represent real dollars being granted from the government, not the Conservative Party and certainly not an individual MP.

The criminal law further states, “It is not necessary that the whole instrument should be fictitious. Making a fraudulent insertion, alteration or erasure in any material part of a true document by which another may be defrauded…are forgeries.” As the dollars being issued are from the government, any presented document verifying these monies could be considered a forgery based on alterations or insertions by the offending MPs.

The numerous photographs of Conservative MPs posing with recipients while brandishing cheques should serve as more than ample evidence once the RCMP begins its investigation. When charges of forgery are alleged, the act of counterfeiting is usually assumed. It does (on the surface) appear that these same MPs have surreptitiously adapted documents with the intent to deceive, to suggest that “they” (personally) and their “party” are responsible for the monies being provided – which, of course, is false. It appears the intent of this alleged forgery is rooted in an established technique in the execution of ‘identity theft’. In the case of presenting monies to constituents (by virtue of their names, logos or signatures on the ceremonial cheques), the MPs have been presenting themselves not as the Government of Canada, but rather as MPs from the Conservative Party of Canada.

This identity theft furthers the notion of forgery as the law points out that “…knowing it to be false with intent that it should be used or acted on as genuine to the prejudice of another.” It could be a relatively safe bet to assume that to the prejudice of another, would be to the prejudice of the Liberals, NDP or Bloc.

And here's a legal clincher: “Forgery is complete notwithstanding that the false document is incomplete or does not purport to be a document that is binding in law, if it is such as to indicate that it was intended to be acted on as genuine.”

There should be little doubt that the MPs presenting the cheques, with the support of their party and the prime minister knew exactly what they were doing and why they were doing it. They knew the intent of the documents they were presenting to the public were false. They knew that they were currying political favour with the public by insinuating that they, individually and as a political party, were acting in prejudice against other political parties. That is reflective of the petty, meanspiritedattitude andpartisanactionsMr. Harper's government seems to enjoy fostering.

Let’s make no mistake about the value of “perception” in politics. It is perhaps the most valuable currency asset a political party has with the electorate. Securing that positive perception while in power, using deceptive techniques is an affront against all of us. The individual MPs, their constituency offices and now the office of the prime minister condone what could very well be considered a crime of forgery. They certainly won’t see it this way and will certainly not do anything to bring themselves to justice. Victory at any cost?

Alan Aylward, Dundas

MPs bestowed with right to make false documents

News Oct 30, 2009 Ancaster News

Re: Stephen’s stimulus slush fund, Oct. 23 The News.

Active and latent “wannabe” forgers and counterfeiters jumped for joy this past week when Prime Minister Stephen Harper unilaterally decriminalized forgery and counterfeiting after dismissing allegations his MPs were doing just that by presenting ceremonial cheques to their constituents that bear their names, and/or party and/or signature.

Under the Criminal Code of Canada, forgery is defined as, “The making of a false document knowing it to be false with intent that it should be used or acted on as genuine to the prejudice of another.” It appears that Conservative MPs have been bestowed with the right to make false documents in the way of presenting ceremonial cheques — which represent Government of Canada taxpayer dollars — to constituencies, thus granting them the authority to knowingly issue a false document to the public with the intent of taking partisan credit for the face value of the cheques.

In the world of politics, perception is everything. If public perception of a political party or its members is negative, it is a liability. If perception is positive, it is an asset. The Conservatives seem willing to stoop to any measure to create that valuable currency — literally by printing their "own" money.

While the cheques are ceremonial, they do, in fact, represent real dollars being granted from the government, not the Conservative Party and certainly not an individual MP.

The criminal law further states, “It is not necessary that the whole instrument should be fictitious. Making a fraudulent insertion, alteration or erasure in any material part of a true document by which another may be defrauded…are forgeries.” As the dollars being issued are from the government, any presented document verifying these monies could be considered a forgery based on alterations or insertions by the offending MPs.

The numerous photographs of Conservative MPs posing with recipients while brandishing cheques should serve as more than ample evidence once the RCMP begins its investigation. When charges of forgery are alleged, the act of counterfeiting is usually assumed. It does (on the surface) appear that these same MPs have surreptitiously adapted documents with the intent to deceive, to suggest that “they” (personally) and their “party” are responsible for the monies being provided – which, of course, is false. It appears the intent of this alleged forgery is rooted in an established technique in the execution of ‘identity theft’. In the case of presenting monies to constituents (by virtue of their names, logos or signatures on the ceremonial cheques), the MPs have been presenting themselves not as the Government of Canada, but rather as MPs from the Conservative Party of Canada.

This identity theft furthers the notion of forgery as the law points out that “…knowing it to be false with intent that it should be used or acted on as genuine to the prejudice of another.” It could be a relatively safe bet to assume that to the prejudice of another, would be to the prejudice of the Liberals, NDP or Bloc.

And here's a legal clincher: “Forgery is complete notwithstanding that the false document is incomplete or does not purport to be a document that is binding in law, if it is such as to indicate that it was intended to be acted on as genuine.”

There should be little doubt that the MPs presenting the cheques, with the support of their party and the prime minister knew exactly what they were doing and why they were doing it. They knew the intent of the documents they were presenting to the public were false. They knew that they were currying political favour with the public by insinuating that they, individually and as a political party, were acting in prejudice against other political parties. That is reflective of the petty, meanspiritedattitude andpartisanactionsMr. Harper's government seems to enjoy fostering.

Let’s make no mistake about the value of “perception” in politics. It is perhaps the most valuable currency asset a political party has with the electorate. Securing that positive perception while in power, using deceptive techniques is an affront against all of us. The individual MPs, their constituency offices and now the office of the prime minister condone what could very well be considered a crime of forgery. They certainly won’t see it this way and will certainly not do anything to bring themselves to justice. Victory at any cost?

Alan Aylward, Dundas

MPs bestowed with right to make false documents

News Oct 30, 2009 Ancaster News

Re: Stephen’s stimulus slush fund, Oct. 23 The News.

Active and latent “wannabe” forgers and counterfeiters jumped for joy this past week when Prime Minister Stephen Harper unilaterally decriminalized forgery and counterfeiting after dismissing allegations his MPs were doing just that by presenting ceremonial cheques to their constituents that bear their names, and/or party and/or signature.

Under the Criminal Code of Canada, forgery is defined as, “The making of a false document knowing it to be false with intent that it should be used or acted on as genuine to the prejudice of another.” It appears that Conservative MPs have been bestowed with the right to make false documents in the way of presenting ceremonial cheques — which represent Government of Canada taxpayer dollars — to constituencies, thus granting them the authority to knowingly issue a false document to the public with the intent of taking partisan credit for the face value of the cheques.

In the world of politics, perception is everything. If public perception of a political party or its members is negative, it is a liability. If perception is positive, it is an asset. The Conservatives seem willing to stoop to any measure to create that valuable currency — literally by printing their "own" money.

While the cheques are ceremonial, they do, in fact, represent real dollars being granted from the government, not the Conservative Party and certainly not an individual MP.

The criminal law further states, “It is not necessary that the whole instrument should be fictitious. Making a fraudulent insertion, alteration or erasure in any material part of a true document by which another may be defrauded…are forgeries.” As the dollars being issued are from the government, any presented document verifying these monies could be considered a forgery based on alterations or insertions by the offending MPs.

The numerous photographs of Conservative MPs posing with recipients while brandishing cheques should serve as more than ample evidence once the RCMP begins its investigation. When charges of forgery are alleged, the act of counterfeiting is usually assumed. It does (on the surface) appear that these same MPs have surreptitiously adapted documents with the intent to deceive, to suggest that “they” (personally) and their “party” are responsible for the monies being provided – which, of course, is false. It appears the intent of this alleged forgery is rooted in an established technique in the execution of ‘identity theft’. In the case of presenting monies to constituents (by virtue of their names, logos or signatures on the ceremonial cheques), the MPs have been presenting themselves not as the Government of Canada, but rather as MPs from the Conservative Party of Canada.

This identity theft furthers the notion of forgery as the law points out that “…knowing it to be false with intent that it should be used or acted on as genuine to the prejudice of another.” It could be a relatively safe bet to assume that to the prejudice of another, would be to the prejudice of the Liberals, NDP or Bloc.

And here's a legal clincher: “Forgery is complete notwithstanding that the false document is incomplete or does not purport to be a document that is binding in law, if it is such as to indicate that it was intended to be acted on as genuine.”

There should be little doubt that the MPs presenting the cheques, with the support of their party and the prime minister knew exactly what they were doing and why they were doing it. They knew the intent of the documents they were presenting to the public were false. They knew that they were currying political favour with the public by insinuating that they, individually and as a political party, were acting in prejudice against other political parties. That is reflective of the petty, meanspiritedattitude andpartisanactionsMr. Harper's government seems to enjoy fostering.

Let’s make no mistake about the value of “perception” in politics. It is perhaps the most valuable currency asset a political party has with the electorate. Securing that positive perception while in power, using deceptive techniques is an affront against all of us. The individual MPs, their constituency offices and now the office of the prime minister condone what could very well be considered a crime of forgery. They certainly won’t see it this way and will certainly not do anything to bring themselves to justice. Victory at any cost?

Alan Aylward, Dundas