Window opens for young performer

News Oct 29, 2009 Ancaster News

A young Dundas performer in the Toronto production of The Sound of Music has one of the most important jobs in the show, yet he doesn’t often get to actually go on stage.

Andy Reid, 12, is a children’s standby. He has to be ready to perform on a moment’s notice in case one of the two boys in the regular cast cannot go on.

That means preparing for two different roles, eight shows a week, just in case.

He said his friends think “it’s cool” that he’s in Toronto’s top-rated musical theatre production. Some of his friends have even come to see him on the nights he was scheduled to perform.

“They said it was really good,” said Andy.

Andy is in Grade 7 at St. Augustine School, and despite his heavy theatre schedule, he said there’s little he misses from his lessons. On a typical day, Andy drives with a parent to the theatre, six days a week, to be available to go onstage. When there is a Wednesday matinee, “My mom emails me my lessons. It’s not too hard to keep up,” he said.

Is it frustrating going to the theatre nearly every day, waiting for a chance to perform?

“Not really,” Andy said. “They do schedule me in. And we have all kinds of fun waiting to go on stage.”

He and his fellow young actors fill their free time backstage doing homework, playing board games or watching — and making — videos.

Andy is in his element performing. He said he caught the stage bug when he was about six years old.

“I saw The Sound of Music at Theatre Aquarius, and I told my mom then that I wanted to perform. So she signed me up.”

Andy said he was also inspired by his oldest sister Niki, who was 10 at the time and studying dancing. Since then, he has had his professional stage debut in Theatre Aquarius’

production of Oliver!, appeared in the super-hero series Team Epic and placed fourth in the 2007 World Tap Dancing Championships in Germany.

Andy credits his two teachers in Hamilton with helping his success — Kerry Correia of Star-Lite Dance Studio and vocal coach Tom Oliver — and his parents, whose support has had the strongest influence in his life.

And for now, he plans to be a performer for the rest of his life. His

advice to other youngsters who want to do more than school performances is “to never give up. Keep on pursuing your dreams.”

Andy didn’t succeed during the first auditions in the summer of 2008.

“When they were recasting, I auditioned again,” he said.

Since then, Andy has been a crucial member of the cast.

“I’ve had many auditions,” he added, sounding like a seasoned pro. “If you don’t make it, don’t take it personally. Everything happens for a reason.”

As if to underscore his belief and illustrate his own example, he cited Maria Von Trapp’s famous quotation about adversity: “When the Lord closes a door, somewhere He opens a window.”

Window opens for young performer

News Oct 29, 2009 Ancaster News

A young Dundas performer in the Toronto production of The Sound of Music has one of the most important jobs in the show, yet he doesn’t often get to actually go on stage.

Andy Reid, 12, is a children’s standby. He has to be ready to perform on a moment’s notice in case one of the two boys in the regular cast cannot go on.

That means preparing for two different roles, eight shows a week, just in case.

He said his friends think “it’s cool” that he’s in Toronto’s top-rated musical theatre production. Some of his friends have even come to see him on the nights he was scheduled to perform.

“They said it was really good,” said Andy.

Andy is in Grade 7 at St. Augustine School, and despite his heavy theatre schedule, he said there’s little he misses from his lessons. On a typical day, Andy drives with a parent to the theatre, six days a week, to be available to go onstage. When there is a Wednesday matinee, “My mom emails me my lessons. It’s not too hard to keep up,” he said.

Is it frustrating going to the theatre nearly every day, waiting for a chance to perform?

“Not really,” Andy said. “They do schedule me in. And we have all kinds of fun waiting to go on stage.”

He and his fellow young actors fill their free time backstage doing homework, playing board games or watching — and making — videos.

Andy is in his element performing. He said he caught the stage bug when he was about six years old.

“I saw The Sound of Music at Theatre Aquarius, and I told my mom then that I wanted to perform. So she signed me up.”

Andy said he was also inspired by his oldest sister Niki, who was 10 at the time and studying dancing. Since then, he has had his professional stage debut in Theatre Aquarius’

production of Oliver!, appeared in the super-hero series Team Epic and placed fourth in the 2007 World Tap Dancing Championships in Germany.

Andy credits his two teachers in Hamilton with helping his success — Kerry Correia of Star-Lite Dance Studio and vocal coach Tom Oliver — and his parents, whose support has had the strongest influence in his life.

And for now, he plans to be a performer for the rest of his life. His

advice to other youngsters who want to do more than school performances is “to never give up. Keep on pursuing your dreams.”

Andy didn’t succeed during the first auditions in the summer of 2008.

“When they were recasting, I auditioned again,” he said.

Since then, Andy has been a crucial member of the cast.

“I’ve had many auditions,” he added, sounding like a seasoned pro. “If you don’t make it, don’t take it personally. Everything happens for a reason.”

As if to underscore his belief and illustrate his own example, he cited Maria Von Trapp’s famous quotation about adversity: “When the Lord closes a door, somewhere He opens a window.”

Window opens for young performer

News Oct 29, 2009 Ancaster News

A young Dundas performer in the Toronto production of The Sound of Music has one of the most important jobs in the show, yet he doesn’t often get to actually go on stage.

Andy Reid, 12, is a children’s standby. He has to be ready to perform on a moment’s notice in case one of the two boys in the regular cast cannot go on.

That means preparing for two different roles, eight shows a week, just in case.

He said his friends think “it’s cool” that he’s in Toronto’s top-rated musical theatre production. Some of his friends have even come to see him on the nights he was scheduled to perform.

“They said it was really good,” said Andy.

Andy is in Grade 7 at St. Augustine School, and despite his heavy theatre schedule, he said there’s little he misses from his lessons. On a typical day, Andy drives with a parent to the theatre, six days a week, to be available to go onstage. When there is a Wednesday matinee, “My mom emails me my lessons. It’s not too hard to keep up,” he said.

Is it frustrating going to the theatre nearly every day, waiting for a chance to perform?

“Not really,” Andy said. “They do schedule me in. And we have all kinds of fun waiting to go on stage.”

He and his fellow young actors fill their free time backstage doing homework, playing board games or watching — and making — videos.

Andy is in his element performing. He said he caught the stage bug when he was about six years old.

“I saw The Sound of Music at Theatre Aquarius, and I told my mom then that I wanted to perform. So she signed me up.”

Andy said he was also inspired by his oldest sister Niki, who was 10 at the time and studying dancing. Since then, he has had his professional stage debut in Theatre Aquarius’

production of Oliver!, appeared in the super-hero series Team Epic and placed fourth in the 2007 World Tap Dancing Championships in Germany.

Andy credits his two teachers in Hamilton with helping his success — Kerry Correia of Star-Lite Dance Studio and vocal coach Tom Oliver — and his parents, whose support has had the strongest influence in his life.

And for now, he plans to be a performer for the rest of his life. His

advice to other youngsters who want to do more than school performances is “to never give up. Keep on pursuing your dreams.”

Andy didn’t succeed during the first auditions in the summer of 2008.

“When they were recasting, I auditioned again,” he said.

Since then, Andy has been a crucial member of the cast.

“I’ve had many auditions,” he added, sounding like a seasoned pro. “If you don’t make it, don’t take it personally. Everything happens for a reason.”

As if to underscore his belief and illustrate his own example, he cited Maria Von Trapp’s famous quotation about adversity: “When the Lord closes a door, somewhere He opens a window.”