Be prepared for Devil’s Night tonight

News Oct 29, 2009 Ancaster News

Tonight (Friday) is Devil’s Night, the evening before Halloween that has in the past been marked by soaped windows, knocked over trash cans and other acts of vandalism.

Hamilton police will be out tonight patrolling not just the main roads but neighbourhood streets and back lanes and alleyways — anywhere potential trouble-makers might congregate.

“Certainly on Devil’s Night, for sure, we have young people out doing mischiefs,” said Hamilton police media relations officer Terri- Lynn Collings. “We’ll have all available resources out watching for those types of activities.”

Sgt. Collings also said the public should be watchful tonight and tomorrow night and report any problems they might spot.

“For parents that have young people at home…know where your children are going and make sure you have contact with them,” Sgt. Collings said.

Sgt. Collings said parents should always check their children’s candy and other treats before they are eaten.

“We have had reports where people have done things (like) sticking sharp objects into apples or into candy wrappers,” Sgt. Collings said. “Parents really have to be diligent about checking over that candy with their kids first.”

Children should also toss out anything that looks homemade or is unwrapped, and never pick up a bag of discarded candy. As far as costumes are concerned, police recommend an outfit that is bright coloured so it can be seen at night. Sgt. Collings said children with dark costumes should add some reflective tape. While make-up is preferred, if a child is wearing a mask, they should make sure the eye holes are big enough so their vision is not partially blocked and costumes should be short enough to prevent tripping. Young children should always be accompanied by an adult, and older children should travel in groups and stay within their neighbourhood. Parents need to make sure the little ones stay on the sidewalk on one side of the street and don’t dart back and forth across the road or between parked vehicles. Only approach homes with the lights on, cross only at corners and don’t walk on lawns.

“If they’re going out on their own, make sure you know what route they’ll be taking and have a general idea when they’re expected back,” Sgt. Collings said.

Trick-or-treating should be done in the early evening hours and children should not enter a home under any circumstances.

Be prepared for Devil’s Night tonight

News Oct 29, 2009 Ancaster News

Tonight (Friday) is Devil’s Night, the evening before Halloween that has in the past been marked by soaped windows, knocked over trash cans and other acts of vandalism.

Hamilton police will be out tonight patrolling not just the main roads but neighbourhood streets and back lanes and alleyways — anywhere potential trouble-makers might congregate.

“Certainly on Devil’s Night, for sure, we have young people out doing mischiefs,” said Hamilton police media relations officer Terri- Lynn Collings. “We’ll have all available resources out watching for those types of activities.”

Sgt. Collings also said the public should be watchful tonight and tomorrow night and report any problems they might spot.

“For parents that have young people at home…know where your children are going and make sure you have contact with them,” Sgt. Collings said.

Sgt. Collings said parents should always check their children’s candy and other treats before they are eaten.

“We have had reports where people have done things (like) sticking sharp objects into apples or into candy wrappers,” Sgt. Collings said. “Parents really have to be diligent about checking over that candy with their kids first.”

Children should also toss out anything that looks homemade or is unwrapped, and never pick up a bag of discarded candy. As far as costumes are concerned, police recommend an outfit that is bright coloured so it can be seen at night. Sgt. Collings said children with dark costumes should add some reflective tape. While make-up is preferred, if a child is wearing a mask, they should make sure the eye holes are big enough so their vision is not partially blocked and costumes should be short enough to prevent tripping. Young children should always be accompanied by an adult, and older children should travel in groups and stay within their neighbourhood. Parents need to make sure the little ones stay on the sidewalk on one side of the street and don’t dart back and forth across the road or between parked vehicles. Only approach homes with the lights on, cross only at corners and don’t walk on lawns.

“If they’re going out on their own, make sure you know what route they’ll be taking and have a general idea when they’re expected back,” Sgt. Collings said.

Trick-or-treating should be done in the early evening hours and children should not enter a home under any circumstances.

Be prepared for Devil’s Night tonight

News Oct 29, 2009 Ancaster News

Tonight (Friday) is Devil’s Night, the evening before Halloween that has in the past been marked by soaped windows, knocked over trash cans and other acts of vandalism.

Hamilton police will be out tonight patrolling not just the main roads but neighbourhood streets and back lanes and alleyways — anywhere potential trouble-makers might congregate.

“Certainly on Devil’s Night, for sure, we have young people out doing mischiefs,” said Hamilton police media relations officer Terri- Lynn Collings. “We’ll have all available resources out watching for those types of activities.”

Sgt. Collings also said the public should be watchful tonight and tomorrow night and report any problems they might spot.

“For parents that have young people at home…know where your children are going and make sure you have contact with them,” Sgt. Collings said.

Sgt. Collings said parents should always check their children’s candy and other treats before they are eaten.

“We have had reports where people have done things (like) sticking sharp objects into apples or into candy wrappers,” Sgt. Collings said. “Parents really have to be diligent about checking over that candy with their kids first.”

Children should also toss out anything that looks homemade or is unwrapped, and never pick up a bag of discarded candy. As far as costumes are concerned, police recommend an outfit that is bright coloured so it can be seen at night. Sgt. Collings said children with dark costumes should add some reflective tape. While make-up is preferred, if a child is wearing a mask, they should make sure the eye holes are big enough so their vision is not partially blocked and costumes should be short enough to prevent tripping. Young children should always be accompanied by an adult, and older children should travel in groups and stay within their neighbourhood. Parents need to make sure the little ones stay on the sidewalk on one side of the street and don’t dart back and forth across the road or between parked vehicles. Only approach homes with the lights on, cross only at corners and don’t walk on lawns.

“If they’re going out on their own, make sure you know what route they’ll be taking and have a general idea when they’re expected back,” Sgt. Collings said.

Trick-or-treating should be done in the early evening hours and children should not enter a home under any circumstances.