Flu clinics swamped; operations continue smoothly

News Oct 29, 2009 Ancaster News

Even though there were long line-ups of close to two hours at Dundas Baptist Church this week to the H1N1 flu vaccination, the clinic operations went smoothly, say city officials.

“People did have to wait,” said Dr. Chris Mackie, associate medicate officer of health, who stood in line Oct. 27 in the evening for about 80 minutes to get his flu shot. “People were pretty reasonable considering the situation.”

On Oct. 26, the first day of the clinic, people were streaming into the church, with vehicles bogging down Governor’s Road. Hamilton Police were called in to assist with traffic control. Up to 60 health-care officials were assisting people inside the clinics.

Jennifer Barretti, 32, a mother with two young children, was just leaving the church after getting the H1N1 flu shot along with her daughter. She waited in line for two hours. Still, she said the decision to get vaccinated was “a no-brainer,” considering she has asthma.

“It was something I really weighed the pros and cons of, right up until I came here,” said Ms. Barretti. “But after talking to my husband, we decided to put our trust in Public Health doing the right thing.”

Amy, who asked that her last name not be used, also waited in line for two hours Oct. 26 before even entering the church with her two-year- old son.

“I didn’t figure I would slide through, but I was surprised the line was as long as it was,” she said. “It shows people are very interested in being protected.”

She decided to get the shot to protect herself and her two young daughters, who are both ill and attend Prince Phillip School in west Hamilton.

Dr. Mackie said the clinics are vaccinating about 1,500 people each day, or about one per cent of Hamilton’s high-priority population.

Dundas Councillor Russ Powers said he was pleased with how the clinics operated in Dundas. Officials knew there would be a high number of individuals turning out for the shots, and they were not surprised when police officers had to be called in to direct traffic, he said.

He also defended the decision to use Dundas Baptist Church as the first location for the flu clinic, arguing health officials wanted a place that was accessible.

“It was the best we could do considering the challenge we are facing,” said Mr. Powers, who will be getting vaccinated.

The people eligible for the vaccine include people with chronic medical conditions under the age of 65, pregnant women, children six months to under five years of age, health care workers involved in the pandemic response and caregivers of individuals who are high risk.

The general public will be able to get vaccinated at clinics public health officials are expecting to open up next week, said Dr. Mackie. No schedule or locations have been determined for the clinics.

The flu clinics for the high-priority people will continue all this week from 1 p. m. to 7 p. m. Flu clinics were also set up at St. Helen’s Elementary School on Britannia Avenue, Chedoke Twin Pad Arena and Jackson Square. The province delivered last week 23,000 doses of the vaccine to the city. Dr. Mackie said it won’t be enough, and is expecting a second shipment of 26,000 doses later this week.

Flu clinics swamped; operations continue smoothly

News Oct 29, 2009 Ancaster News

Even though there were long line-ups of close to two hours at Dundas Baptist Church this week to the H1N1 flu vaccination, the clinic operations went smoothly, say city officials.

“People did have to wait,” said Dr. Chris Mackie, associate medicate officer of health, who stood in line Oct. 27 in the evening for about 80 minutes to get his flu shot. “People were pretty reasonable considering the situation.”

On Oct. 26, the first day of the clinic, people were streaming into the church, with vehicles bogging down Governor’s Road. Hamilton Police were called in to assist with traffic control. Up to 60 health-care officials were assisting people inside the clinics.

Jennifer Barretti, 32, a mother with two young children, was just leaving the church after getting the H1N1 flu shot along with her daughter. She waited in line for two hours. Still, she said the decision to get vaccinated was “a no-brainer,” considering she has asthma.

“It was something I really weighed the pros and cons of, right up until I came here,” said Ms. Barretti. “But after talking to my husband, we decided to put our trust in Public Health doing the right thing.”

Amy, who asked that her last name not be used, also waited in line for two hours Oct. 26 before even entering the church with her two-year- old son.

“I didn’t figure I would slide through, but I was surprised the line was as long as it was,” she said. “It shows people are very interested in being protected.”

She decided to get the shot to protect herself and her two young daughters, who are both ill and attend Prince Phillip School in west Hamilton.

Dr. Mackie said the clinics are vaccinating about 1,500 people each day, or about one per cent of Hamilton’s high-priority population.

Dundas Councillor Russ Powers said he was pleased with how the clinics operated in Dundas. Officials knew there would be a high number of individuals turning out for the shots, and they were not surprised when police officers had to be called in to direct traffic, he said.

He also defended the decision to use Dundas Baptist Church as the first location for the flu clinic, arguing health officials wanted a place that was accessible.

“It was the best we could do considering the challenge we are facing,” said Mr. Powers, who will be getting vaccinated.

The people eligible for the vaccine include people with chronic medical conditions under the age of 65, pregnant women, children six months to under five years of age, health care workers involved in the pandemic response and caregivers of individuals who are high risk.

The general public will be able to get vaccinated at clinics public health officials are expecting to open up next week, said Dr. Mackie. No schedule or locations have been determined for the clinics.

The flu clinics for the high-priority people will continue all this week from 1 p. m. to 7 p. m. Flu clinics were also set up at St. Helen’s Elementary School on Britannia Avenue, Chedoke Twin Pad Arena and Jackson Square. The province delivered last week 23,000 doses of the vaccine to the city. Dr. Mackie said it won’t be enough, and is expecting a second shipment of 26,000 doses later this week.

Flu clinics swamped; operations continue smoothly

News Oct 29, 2009 Ancaster News

Even though there were long line-ups of close to two hours at Dundas Baptist Church this week to the H1N1 flu vaccination, the clinic operations went smoothly, say city officials.

“People did have to wait,” said Dr. Chris Mackie, associate medicate officer of health, who stood in line Oct. 27 in the evening for about 80 minutes to get his flu shot. “People were pretty reasonable considering the situation.”

On Oct. 26, the first day of the clinic, people were streaming into the church, with vehicles bogging down Governor’s Road. Hamilton Police were called in to assist with traffic control. Up to 60 health-care officials were assisting people inside the clinics.

Jennifer Barretti, 32, a mother with two young children, was just leaving the church after getting the H1N1 flu shot along with her daughter. She waited in line for two hours. Still, she said the decision to get vaccinated was “a no-brainer,” considering she has asthma.

“It was something I really weighed the pros and cons of, right up until I came here,” said Ms. Barretti. “But after talking to my husband, we decided to put our trust in Public Health doing the right thing.”

Amy, who asked that her last name not be used, also waited in line for two hours Oct. 26 before even entering the church with her two-year- old son.

“I didn’t figure I would slide through, but I was surprised the line was as long as it was,” she said. “It shows people are very interested in being protected.”

She decided to get the shot to protect herself and her two young daughters, who are both ill and attend Prince Phillip School in west Hamilton.

Dr. Mackie said the clinics are vaccinating about 1,500 people each day, or about one per cent of Hamilton’s high-priority population.

Dundas Councillor Russ Powers said he was pleased with how the clinics operated in Dundas. Officials knew there would be a high number of individuals turning out for the shots, and they were not surprised when police officers had to be called in to direct traffic, he said.

He also defended the decision to use Dundas Baptist Church as the first location for the flu clinic, arguing health officials wanted a place that was accessible.

“It was the best we could do considering the challenge we are facing,” said Mr. Powers, who will be getting vaccinated.

The people eligible for the vaccine include people with chronic medical conditions under the age of 65, pregnant women, children six months to under five years of age, health care workers involved in the pandemic response and caregivers of individuals who are high risk.

The general public will be able to get vaccinated at clinics public health officials are expecting to open up next week, said Dr. Mackie. No schedule or locations have been determined for the clinics.

The flu clinics for the high-priority people will continue all this week from 1 p. m. to 7 p. m. Flu clinics were also set up at St. Helen’s Elementary School on Britannia Avenue, Chedoke Twin Pad Arena and Jackson Square. The province delivered last week 23,000 doses of the vaccine to the city. Dr. Mackie said it won’t be enough, and is expecting a second shipment of 26,000 doses later this week.