Iconic Canadian firm marks 10th anniversary

News Oct 23, 2009 Ancaster News

With the 10th anniversary of the death of department store giant Eaton's fast approaching, Sylvia DelCol thought it would be nice to hold a reunion.

She had been gathering every couple of months with people she had worked with in the children's wear department at the Lime Ridge Mall store.

Little did she know there were many other groups of former employees which had also been meeting regularly.

It's not surprising, said Ms. DelCol, who worked for the iconic Canadian firm for 13 years.

"Eaton's always prided itself in being a family," she said.

It's true, said George Zivic, who started with Eaton's downtown Hamilton store in 1981 in the camera and business equipment department.

Because the family-owned chain believed in family values as much as profit, he said, the store was only open Thursday and Friday nights, leaving time for communal events, like trips or Tuesday night baseball games.

Many employees at the department store worked there for decades — it was more of a career than working at today's commercial outlets, said Mr. Zivic— so there was a bonding among the staff.

Mr. Zivic was one of the few employees who opened and closed the Lime Ridge store, the mall's first anchor store.

Through the mall opened less than 30 years ago, the locale was much, much different than today. Unlike today, there was little commercial development and few homes south of Mohawk Road.

"When we opened the mall, where the Toys 'R' Us is now was still a farmer's field," he recalled.

Closeout bin

There was also a bin of eight-track tapes in the closeout bin and Commodore 64 computers with a 5 1/4-inch floppy drive, sold packaged with a desk for $1,200 when the store opened, he said.

He noted the Mountain location was a showcase store for Eaton's, a "jewel" that the company spent top dollar on from high-end fixtures to hard wood floors. By the end of its run, the Lime Ridge store rivalled the downtown store in sales volume, he said.

Jodi Jacina, who worked for Eaton's downtown and Eastgate stores for 18 years, said loyal customers still remember her today from her Eaton's days.

She added that no job since those days has given her the satisfaction or pride she had back then.

"I know I wasn't conceived there," Ms. Jacina joked, "but I think I was born there and I always thought I'd die there."

The Eaton's Hamilton reunion is being held Nov. 4 at Michaelangelo's on Upper Ottawa beginning at 6 p. m. with a cash bar. Tickets are $25, must be purchased by Oct. 28 and can be obtained by calling 905-679-4803 or e-mailing eatonsreunion2009@hotmail.com .

Iconic Canadian firm marks 10th anniversary

News Oct 23, 2009 Ancaster News

With the 10th anniversary of the death of department store giant Eaton's fast approaching, Sylvia DelCol thought it would be nice to hold a reunion.

She had been gathering every couple of months with people she had worked with in the children's wear department at the Lime Ridge Mall store.

Little did she know there were many other groups of former employees which had also been meeting regularly.

It's not surprising, said Ms. DelCol, who worked for the iconic Canadian firm for 13 years.

"Eaton's always prided itself in being a family," she said.

It's true, said George Zivic, who started with Eaton's downtown Hamilton store in 1981 in the camera and business equipment department.

Because the family-owned chain believed in family values as much as profit, he said, the store was only open Thursday and Friday nights, leaving time for communal events, like trips or Tuesday night baseball games.

Many employees at the department store worked there for decades — it was more of a career than working at today's commercial outlets, said Mr. Zivic— so there was a bonding among the staff.

Mr. Zivic was one of the few employees who opened and closed the Lime Ridge store, the mall's first anchor store.

Through the mall opened less than 30 years ago, the locale was much, much different than today. Unlike today, there was little commercial development and few homes south of Mohawk Road.

"When we opened the mall, where the Toys 'R' Us is now was still a farmer's field," he recalled.

Closeout bin

There was also a bin of eight-track tapes in the closeout bin and Commodore 64 computers with a 5 1/4-inch floppy drive, sold packaged with a desk for $1,200 when the store opened, he said.

He noted the Mountain location was a showcase store for Eaton's, a "jewel" that the company spent top dollar on from high-end fixtures to hard wood floors. By the end of its run, the Lime Ridge store rivalled the downtown store in sales volume, he said.

Jodi Jacina, who worked for Eaton's downtown and Eastgate stores for 18 years, said loyal customers still remember her today from her Eaton's days.

She added that no job since those days has given her the satisfaction or pride she had back then.

"I know I wasn't conceived there," Ms. Jacina joked, "but I think I was born there and I always thought I'd die there."

The Eaton's Hamilton reunion is being held Nov. 4 at Michaelangelo's on Upper Ottawa beginning at 6 p. m. with a cash bar. Tickets are $25, must be purchased by Oct. 28 and can be obtained by calling 905-679-4803 or e-mailing eatonsreunion2009@hotmail.com .

Iconic Canadian firm marks 10th anniversary

News Oct 23, 2009 Ancaster News

With the 10th anniversary of the death of department store giant Eaton's fast approaching, Sylvia DelCol thought it would be nice to hold a reunion.

She had been gathering every couple of months with people she had worked with in the children's wear department at the Lime Ridge Mall store.

Little did she know there were many other groups of former employees which had also been meeting regularly.

It's not surprising, said Ms. DelCol, who worked for the iconic Canadian firm for 13 years.

"Eaton's always prided itself in being a family," she said.

It's true, said George Zivic, who started with Eaton's downtown Hamilton store in 1981 in the camera and business equipment department.

Because the family-owned chain believed in family values as much as profit, he said, the store was only open Thursday and Friday nights, leaving time for communal events, like trips or Tuesday night baseball games.

Many employees at the department store worked there for decades — it was more of a career than working at today's commercial outlets, said Mr. Zivic— so there was a bonding among the staff.

Mr. Zivic was one of the few employees who opened and closed the Lime Ridge store, the mall's first anchor store.

Through the mall opened less than 30 years ago, the locale was much, much different than today. Unlike today, there was little commercial development and few homes south of Mohawk Road.

"When we opened the mall, where the Toys 'R' Us is now was still a farmer's field," he recalled.

Closeout bin

There was also a bin of eight-track tapes in the closeout bin and Commodore 64 computers with a 5 1/4-inch floppy drive, sold packaged with a desk for $1,200 when the store opened, he said.

He noted the Mountain location was a showcase store for Eaton's, a "jewel" that the company spent top dollar on from high-end fixtures to hard wood floors. By the end of its run, the Lime Ridge store rivalled the downtown store in sales volume, he said.

Jodi Jacina, who worked for Eaton's downtown and Eastgate stores for 18 years, said loyal customers still remember her today from her Eaton's days.

She added that no job since those days has given her the satisfaction or pride she had back then.

"I know I wasn't conceived there," Ms. Jacina joked, "but I think I was born there and I always thought I'd die there."

The Eaton's Hamilton reunion is being held Nov. 4 at Michaelangelo's on Upper Ottawa beginning at 6 p. m. with a cash bar. Tickets are $25, must be purchased by Oct. 28 and can be obtained by calling 905-679-4803 or e-mailing eatonsreunion2009@hotmail.com .