Police board reviewing cop compensation for injuries suffered on job

News Oct 23, 2009 Ancaster News

Whether police officers should be allowed to receive provincial victim compensation for injuries suffered on the job will be reviewed by Hamilton's Police Service Board.

Sparked by public questions about police across Ontario accessing Criminal Injuries Compensation Board funds, police board member Terry Whitehead asked at the end of the Oct. 19 meeting if this was something the Hamilton police board should take an official position on.

"I think we should at least have that dialogue and discussion," Mr. Whitehead said.

He noted public concern over whether police were originally intended to be compensated by the program. He suggested people involved in high-risk" jobs in health care and other fields don't receive compensation over above what is negotiated in their individual collective agreements — unlike police officers, who knowingly enter a career that could put them at risk. He said there has been some public angst over the idea that officers may deplete money in a fund intended to compensate other victims.

Deputy Chief Eric Girt said police officers can still become victims while on the job and therefore are entitled to the compensation fund.

"I'd have to say they are still victims and should be treated that way," Mr. Girt said.

"I'm not taking a position," Mr. Whitehead said, adding he wanted the board to at least review the issue and possibly send an opinion to the province.

Deputy Chief Ken Leendertse said a report can be prepared for a future meeting of the board.

Police board reviewing cop compensation for injuries suffered on job

News Oct 23, 2009 Ancaster News

Whether police officers should be allowed to receive provincial victim compensation for injuries suffered on the job will be reviewed by Hamilton's Police Service Board.

Sparked by public questions about police across Ontario accessing Criminal Injuries Compensation Board funds, police board member Terry Whitehead asked at the end of the Oct. 19 meeting if this was something the Hamilton police board should take an official position on.

"I think we should at least have that dialogue and discussion," Mr. Whitehead said.

He noted public concern over whether police were originally intended to be compensated by the program. He suggested people involved in high-risk" jobs in health care and other fields don't receive compensation over above what is negotiated in their individual collective agreements — unlike police officers, who knowingly enter a career that could put them at risk. He said there has been some public angst over the idea that officers may deplete money in a fund intended to compensate other victims.

Deputy Chief Eric Girt said police officers can still become victims while on the job and therefore are entitled to the compensation fund.

"I'd have to say they are still victims and should be treated that way," Mr. Girt said.

"I'm not taking a position," Mr. Whitehead said, adding he wanted the board to at least review the issue and possibly send an opinion to the province.

Deputy Chief Ken Leendertse said a report can be prepared for a future meeting of the board.

Police board reviewing cop compensation for injuries suffered on job

News Oct 23, 2009 Ancaster News

Whether police officers should be allowed to receive provincial victim compensation for injuries suffered on the job will be reviewed by Hamilton's Police Service Board.

Sparked by public questions about police across Ontario accessing Criminal Injuries Compensation Board funds, police board member Terry Whitehead asked at the end of the Oct. 19 meeting if this was something the Hamilton police board should take an official position on.

"I think we should at least have that dialogue and discussion," Mr. Whitehead said.

He noted public concern over whether police were originally intended to be compensated by the program. He suggested people involved in high-risk" jobs in health care and other fields don't receive compensation over above what is negotiated in their individual collective agreements — unlike police officers, who knowingly enter a career that could put them at risk. He said there has been some public angst over the idea that officers may deplete money in a fund intended to compensate other victims.

Deputy Chief Eric Girt said police officers can still become victims while on the job and therefore are entitled to the compensation fund.

"I'd have to say they are still victims and should be treated that way," Mr. Girt said.

"I'm not taking a position," Mr. Whitehead said, adding he wanted the board to at least review the issue and possibly send an opinion to the province.

Deputy Chief Ken Leendertse said a report can be prepared for a future meeting of the board.