Police graffiti awareness improves enforcement

News Oct 23, 2009 Ancaster News

Increased awareness of graffiti as a crime has resulted in more cases reported and more arrests by Hamilton police.

In the first nine months of this year, there have been 445 graffiti incidents reported. That’s an increase of 108 reports over the same period last year.

“Therefore, reported graffiti incidents have increased by 32 per cent in 2009 over 2008,” states an information report to the police services board on Hamilton graffiti initiatives.

In fact, the report indicates graffiti incidents have continued to increase every year. But police say that’s not a sign of more graffiti, but an indication their education, elimination and enforcement protocols, formally introduced in 2006, are working.

Deputy Chief Ken Leendertse said police graffiti initiatives have increased awareness of graffiti and its impact.

“We’ve changed community attitudes about graffiti,” he said. “The community said, enough is enough –it’s a crime. We have more people reporting graffiti. We’re making more arrests than ever before.”

So far, 71 people have been arrested on graffiti related charges this year.

A three-year graffiti prevention strategy pilot project ran from 2006 until 2008, with four new local students hired each summer to support it.

Community presentations about graffiti as a crime and partnerships with other community groups were all part of the project.

The police and City of Hamilton joined forces, and school liaison officers provided graffiti lesson plans.

A new process was created to improve communication with city staff.

Graffiti response and investigation was prioritized as hate bias graffiti, gang-related, and politically motivated. All reports were directed to the city and staff there screened complaints and facilitated communication with police – particularly when the incident fell into one of the three priority categories.

The report concludes there is more work to be done to battle graffiti and the education, elimination and enforcement effort must continue to focus on partnerships to be productive.

Police graffiti awareness improves enforcement

News Oct 23, 2009 Ancaster News

Increased awareness of graffiti as a crime has resulted in more cases reported and more arrests by Hamilton police.

In the first nine months of this year, there have been 445 graffiti incidents reported. That’s an increase of 108 reports over the same period last year.

“Therefore, reported graffiti incidents have increased by 32 per cent in 2009 over 2008,” states an information report to the police services board on Hamilton graffiti initiatives.

In fact, the report indicates graffiti incidents have continued to increase every year. But police say that’s not a sign of more graffiti, but an indication their education, elimination and enforcement protocols, formally introduced in 2006, are working.

Deputy Chief Ken Leendertse said police graffiti initiatives have increased awareness of graffiti and its impact.

“We’ve changed community attitudes about graffiti,” he said. “The community said, enough is enough –it’s a crime. We have more people reporting graffiti. We’re making more arrests than ever before.”

So far, 71 people have been arrested on graffiti related charges this year.

A three-year graffiti prevention strategy pilot project ran from 2006 until 2008, with four new local students hired each summer to support it.

Community presentations about graffiti as a crime and partnerships with other community groups were all part of the project.

The police and City of Hamilton joined forces, and school liaison officers provided graffiti lesson plans.

A new process was created to improve communication with city staff.

Graffiti response and investigation was prioritized as hate bias graffiti, gang-related, and politically motivated. All reports were directed to the city and staff there screened complaints and facilitated communication with police – particularly when the incident fell into one of the three priority categories.

The report concludes there is more work to be done to battle graffiti and the education, elimination and enforcement effort must continue to focus on partnerships to be productive.

Police graffiti awareness improves enforcement

News Oct 23, 2009 Ancaster News

Increased awareness of graffiti as a crime has resulted in more cases reported and more arrests by Hamilton police.

In the first nine months of this year, there have been 445 graffiti incidents reported. That’s an increase of 108 reports over the same period last year.

“Therefore, reported graffiti incidents have increased by 32 per cent in 2009 over 2008,” states an information report to the police services board on Hamilton graffiti initiatives.

In fact, the report indicates graffiti incidents have continued to increase every year. But police say that’s not a sign of more graffiti, but an indication their education, elimination and enforcement protocols, formally introduced in 2006, are working.

Deputy Chief Ken Leendertse said police graffiti initiatives have increased awareness of graffiti and its impact.

“We’ve changed community attitudes about graffiti,” he said. “The community said, enough is enough –it’s a crime. We have more people reporting graffiti. We’re making more arrests than ever before.”

So far, 71 people have been arrested on graffiti related charges this year.

A three-year graffiti prevention strategy pilot project ran from 2006 until 2008, with four new local students hired each summer to support it.

Community presentations about graffiti as a crime and partnerships with other community groups were all part of the project.

The police and City of Hamilton joined forces, and school liaison officers provided graffiti lesson plans.

A new process was created to improve communication with city staff.

Graffiti response and investigation was prioritized as hate bias graffiti, gang-related, and politically motivated. All reports were directed to the city and staff there screened complaints and facilitated communication with police – particularly when the incident fell into one of the three priority categories.

The report concludes there is more work to be done to battle graffiti and the education, elimination and enforcement effort must continue to focus on partnerships to be productive.