Proud dad literally welcomes daughter with open arms

News Oct 23, 2009 Ancaster News

When Troy and Michelle Smith welcomed the new addition to their family, dad thought his job would be to hold his wife’s leg or rub her back.

Baby Lydia had other ideas.

Troy and Michelle were set to meet the new arrival on Oct. 11, but two days previous, at 1:30 in the morning, Michelle’s water broke. After welcoming their first daughter, Rita, 19 months ago at St. Joseph’s Hospital, the Smiths had planned a home birth with the assistance of midwives.

An hour and a half after baby Lydia signalled her intention to arrive early, everything appeared to be going precisely as planned. Once Michelle’s contractions reached five minutes apart, dutiful dad paged the midwife.

Troy settled in to wait for the professionals to arrive and take over. But then dad’s heart skipped a beat as his wife told him she had the urge to push.

Troy quickly dialled 911. “I was getting a little

bit nervous, but I was trying to stay calm,” said dad. “I tried to keep it together, but I was pretty nervous.”

As the 911 operator determined the emergency and coached Troy on what to do, the young father knew his second daughter wasn’t going to wait for the midwives or paramedics.

“I could see the baby’s head. I put down the phone from 911 and my wife pushed the baby right out into my hands,” he said.

Troy then picked the phone back up, and the “extremely helpful” 911 operator provided careful instructions about wiping the baby’s nose and mouth and placing the newborn on mom’s belly.

About six minutes later, paramedics arrived.

“Mom and baby were doing fine, and never went to the hospital.”

Troy, who is employed as a funeral director at Cattel, Eaton and Chambers in Dundas, grew up on the Smith family farm in Copetown. He has assisted in delivering plenty of animal offspring, but said it didn’t prepare him for the job of midwife.

And while he wouldn’t recommend dads play such an active role in delivering a child, he has high praise for home births.

“It was wonderful being at home...it was great...but doing it myself was a little scary,” said the proud pop.

Baby Lydia Anna Rose Smith weighed nine pounds, one ounce and was born at 4:30 a. m. on Oct. 9. Proud grandparents are Cam Smith and Wendy Smith, Barb and Vince Vyhnal and great grandparents Bill and Vera Buchanan.

Proud dad literally welcomes daughter with open arms

News Oct 23, 2009 Ancaster News

When Troy and Michelle Smith welcomed the new addition to their family, dad thought his job would be to hold his wife’s leg or rub her back.

Baby Lydia had other ideas.

Troy and Michelle were set to meet the new arrival on Oct. 11, but two days previous, at 1:30 in the morning, Michelle’s water broke. After welcoming their first daughter, Rita, 19 months ago at St. Joseph’s Hospital, the Smiths had planned a home birth with the assistance of midwives.

An hour and a half after baby Lydia signalled her intention to arrive early, everything appeared to be going precisely as planned. Once Michelle’s contractions reached five minutes apart, dutiful dad paged the midwife.

Troy settled in to wait for the professionals to arrive and take over. But then dad’s heart skipped a beat as his wife told him she had the urge to push.

Troy quickly dialled 911. “I was getting a little

bit nervous, but I was trying to stay calm,” said dad. “I tried to keep it together, but I was pretty nervous.”

As the 911 operator determined the emergency and coached Troy on what to do, the young father knew his second daughter wasn’t going to wait for the midwives or paramedics.

“I could see the baby’s head. I put down the phone from 911 and my wife pushed the baby right out into my hands,” he said.

Troy then picked the phone back up, and the “extremely helpful” 911 operator provided careful instructions about wiping the baby’s nose and mouth and placing the newborn on mom’s belly.

About six minutes later, paramedics arrived.

“Mom and baby were doing fine, and never went to the hospital.”

Troy, who is employed as a funeral director at Cattel, Eaton and Chambers in Dundas, grew up on the Smith family farm in Copetown. He has assisted in delivering plenty of animal offspring, but said it didn’t prepare him for the job of midwife.

And while he wouldn’t recommend dads play such an active role in delivering a child, he has high praise for home births.

“It was wonderful being at home...it was great...but doing it myself was a little scary,” said the proud pop.

Baby Lydia Anna Rose Smith weighed nine pounds, one ounce and was born at 4:30 a. m. on Oct. 9. Proud grandparents are Cam Smith and Wendy Smith, Barb and Vince Vyhnal and great grandparents Bill and Vera Buchanan.

Proud dad literally welcomes daughter with open arms

News Oct 23, 2009 Ancaster News

When Troy and Michelle Smith welcomed the new addition to their family, dad thought his job would be to hold his wife’s leg or rub her back.

Baby Lydia had other ideas.

Troy and Michelle were set to meet the new arrival on Oct. 11, but two days previous, at 1:30 in the morning, Michelle’s water broke. After welcoming their first daughter, Rita, 19 months ago at St. Joseph’s Hospital, the Smiths had planned a home birth with the assistance of midwives.

An hour and a half after baby Lydia signalled her intention to arrive early, everything appeared to be going precisely as planned. Once Michelle’s contractions reached five minutes apart, dutiful dad paged the midwife.

Troy settled in to wait for the professionals to arrive and take over. But then dad’s heart skipped a beat as his wife told him she had the urge to push.

Troy quickly dialled 911. “I was getting a little

bit nervous, but I was trying to stay calm,” said dad. “I tried to keep it together, but I was pretty nervous.”

As the 911 operator determined the emergency and coached Troy on what to do, the young father knew his second daughter wasn’t going to wait for the midwives or paramedics.

“I could see the baby’s head. I put down the phone from 911 and my wife pushed the baby right out into my hands,” he said.

Troy then picked the phone back up, and the “extremely helpful” 911 operator provided careful instructions about wiping the baby’s nose and mouth and placing the newborn on mom’s belly.

About six minutes later, paramedics arrived.

“Mom and baby were doing fine, and never went to the hospital.”

Troy, who is employed as a funeral director at Cattel, Eaton and Chambers in Dundas, grew up on the Smith family farm in Copetown. He has assisted in delivering plenty of animal offspring, but said it didn’t prepare him for the job of midwife.

And while he wouldn’t recommend dads play such an active role in delivering a child, he has high praise for home births.

“It was wonderful being at home...it was great...but doing it myself was a little scary,” said the proud pop.

Baby Lydia Anna Rose Smith weighed nine pounds, one ounce and was born at 4:30 a. m. on Oct. 9. Proud grandparents are Cam Smith and Wendy Smith, Barb and Vince Vyhnal and great grandparents Bill and Vera Buchanan.